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Fiesta Femenina: Celebrating Women In Mexican Folktale
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Fiesta Femenina: Celebrating Women In Mexican Folktale

4.22 of 5 stars 4.22  ·  rating details  ·  27 ratings  ·  8 reviews
A collection of folktales from various cultures in Mexico, all focusing on the important roles of women, such as Rosha, a young girl who rescues the sun; the goddess Tangu Yuh; Kesne, a Zapotec princess; and the Virgin Mary.
Paperback, 64 pages
Published April 1st 2005 by Barefoot Books (first published August 2001)
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Cayla Caudillo
Kirkus Review
Drawing on rich strands of Mexican culture, these smoothly told folktales celebrate women, ranging from mythical goddesses to the historical Malintzen (a.k.a. Malinche). Among the tales drawn from the cultures of pre-Spanish Mexico, are “Rosha and the Sun,” from the Maya; “The Hungry Goddess,” an Aztec tale; “The Legend of Tangu Yu,” from the Zapotec; and “Why the Moon Is Free,” a Yaqui tale. Others, many with complex and mysterious origins, include “The Green Bird” and “Blancaflor,
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Marissa Garcia
This is a collection of eight folktales from Mexico that showcase brave, clever, or powerful female heroines. In her introduction. Mary-Joan Gerson, the collector, explains that she aimed to represent a variety of female roles in Fiesta Feminina, and show the complexity of character. The women in this collection are not just one type of fierce. There is the Malinche figure, Mexico’s most notorious traitor/protector, there is the Moon, who prefers to remain unmarried, and there is even the Virgin ...more
Marissa Garcia
This is a collection of eight folktales from Mexico that showcase brave, clever, or powerful female heroines. In her introduction. Mary-Joan Gerson, the collector, explains that she aimed to represent a variety of female roles in Fiesta Feminina, and show the complexity of character. The women in this collection are not just one type of fierce. There is the Malinche figure, Mexico’s most notorious traitor/protector, there is the Moon, who prefers to remain unmarried, and there is even the Virgin ...more
Kelsey
Age: 7-10 years-old
Media: predominantly acrylic

Although the author's expertise on Mexican culture is only based on personal interest, there is still a lovely collection of 8 stories with prominent female protagonists that are celebrated ("The Hungry Goddess" is excluded from this) including a bullied sister, a free moon, La Virgen de Guadalupe, the cunning Blancaflor, and the controversial Malintzin/Malinche. The writing style of the author makes for great storytelling.

Some issues I have with th
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Laura
This is definitely a book to be read by or to 3rd graders and up. It would be best to have this book in a classroom where the majority of the students are Hispanic. These stories are legends from the indigenous people of ancient Mexico about women who were very important to their culture and to their people. These stories are told to inspire, mainly, young Hispanic women who might find themselves in a culture that does not support them to their full potential. I believe stories such as these can ...more
(NS)JenniferA
The very talented storyteller, Mary-Joan Gerson retells many authentic stories which revolve around Mexico's many rich cultural traditions. These stories all involve females. The book is a collection of eight stories, all with colorful and strikingly beautiful illustrations.
Lorraine
Lovely collection of Mexican folktales featuring powerful women - and vivid, bright illustrations that I adore!
Angela Solache
Great compilation of Mexican folktales, and I love the illustrations.
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