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A World Destroyed: Hiroshima and Its Legacies
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A World Destroyed: Hiroshima and Its Legacies

4.09  ·  Rating Details  ·  58 Ratings  ·  8 Reviews
This is the classic, prize-winning history of the birth of the nuclear age, from the development of the American atomic bomb to the decision to use it against Japan to the origins of the arms race with the Soviet Union.
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Published August 1st 2010 by Blackstone Audiobooks (first published 1975)
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stephanie
one of the best books that asks the question: was dropping the bomb on hiroshima necessary? what about nagasaki? what ramifications did they have for the world sphere?

american war vets will tell you the bomb was dropped to save millions of young american lives, because japan wasn't going to surrender and an invasion of the main island was going to have to happen. other people will tell you the bomb was dropped because it was easy. others will say that it was dropped to show the soviets exactly
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George
Oct 21, 2011 George rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A powerful study of the development of the first atomic bomb. Especially strong on the relationships between the scientists, military people, and political figures involved in the process. Thoroughly documented and very readable.
Sarah Crawford
Feb 12, 2016 Sarah Crawford rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This is another of the books dealing with the atomic bombing of Japan, but it also relates this to the post-war arms race.

Although the book itself is quite good, I'm only going to point out a few things that I found significant.

In relation to Secretary of War Stimson and his role:

”By March he was convinced that its development raised issues that 'went right down to the bottom facts of human nature, morals and government.'”

The book also notes that, unlike some others in the leadership, he “harbo
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Grant
Jun 02, 2014 Grant rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
A, if not the, classic study of American decision-making leading up to the use of atomic bombs against Japan during World War II. Sherwin's particular strengths are his very balanced tone and the inclusion of the points of view of military, civilian, and scientific leaders. He is also excellent in describing the processes involved.
Daniel
Oct 04, 2013 Daniel rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Over turns some very widely held beliefs about the development of the atom bomb. Einstein's role was minimal; U.S. and British concern about post-war relations with the Soviets was a major factor in the decision to use the bomb; and perhaps most shocking of all is that casualty estimates for an invasion of Japan - often cited as justification for using the bomb against the Japanese - were nowhere near the number of killed by the destruction of Nagasaki and Hiroshima. A must read.
Derek Ide
Mar 07, 2014 Derek Ide rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Dispels the notion of discontinuity between Roosevelt and Truman. Instead, Sherwin's very convincing and compelling narrative is one of continuity between the two administrations regarding the development and use of the atomic bomb.
Matt
Jun 01, 2011 Matt rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A really wonderful book about the creation and use of the atom bomb. If you are looking for an in depth exploration of the Manhattan Project and it's aftermath in a political, not scientific way, this is the book for you!
Nanci Svensson
Freak show! Half man, half chair, half hilarious! Recommended!
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45878
Martin J. Sherwin is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American historian. His scholarship mostly concerns the history of the development of atomic energy and nuclear proliferation.

Sherwin received his B.A. from Dartmouth College and his Ph.D. in history from the University of California, Los Angeles. He was the long-time Walter S. Dickson professor of English and American history at Tufts University until
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