Me and You
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Me and You

3.89 of 5 stars 3.89  ·  rating details  ·  260 ratings  ·  73 reviews
A small bear goes for a stroll in the park with his parents, leaving their bowls of porridge cooling on the kitchen table. Meanwhile, a girl with golden hair is hopelessly lost in a big, frightening city when she comes across a house with the door left invitingly open. Inside are three bowls of porridge in the kitchen, three chairs in the living room, and three comfortable...more
Hardcover, 32 pages
Published October 26th 2010 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR) (first published April 1st 2010)
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Shifa Ahmed
'Me and You' By Anthony Browne

A modern take on the traditional Goldilocks and the Three Bears but tells two stories at the same time; one in word form and the other in picture form.
The picture form is about a young girl who goes out shopping with her mum and gets lost in rough part of town. She finds the three bears’ house and once inside follows the story; eats porridge, breaks baby bear’s chair and falls asleep in its bed. The word form is Baby Bear’s story, and the upset on finding a strange...more
Candice
May 01, 2011 Candice rated it 4 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Sophie - when she's older
Shelves: picture-books
A re-telling of Goldilocks and the Three Bears from the points of both Goldilocks and the bears. The left page of each two-page spread is a wordless series of small black and white (except for the yellow hair) pictures of Goldilocks. The right page is done in color and has the traditional story narrated by Baby Bear. The style of the illustrations is also different. The ones for Goldilocks are almost photographic while the ones of the bears are childish color pencil drawings. The setting is urba...more
Sarah
I like the way this version of the classic "Goldilocks" forces us to think about Goldie's motivation to go into the bears' house in the first place. Here, she's lonely and clearly from a rough side of town. We see her side of the story through black and white panels, whereas the bears are shown in large colorful and scenes, their familial love evident.

This would make a good mentor text for point of view.
Angela
Anthony Browne is clearly a genius. His picture book talents seem limitless. And his newest arrival to the States does not disappoint.

This is Goldilocks like you've never seen her before. Browne's new perspectives on the story are layered and enchanted. The lore and urban setting will change you're imaginings forever.
Cheryl in CC NV
I've always loved the versions of the classic fairy tale which have the bear family wanting to befriend the girl. By making the MC of this story a lonely little bear, Browne takes that idea a bit further, and gives us a true treat of a book. He does the side-by-side stories, and the sub-texted wordless stories, so well.
Tasha
This is a version of Goldilocks that is sure to make readers think. The story of Goldilocks is told opposite that of the Bear family. Goldilocks comes from a rough part of town, complete with broken windows and graffiti. After chasing a balloon that gets away, she finds herself in front of the Bears’ home. It’s a pretty yellow home, obviously comfortably middle class. The Bears have headed out for a walk in the neighboring park, chatting about work, the home and the car. When they return, they f...more
Christina Taylor
In a double narrative, Me and You is a transformation of the fairy tale Goldilocks and the Three Bears. In wordless sepia toned illustrations, Browne depicts Goldilocks’ origin story set in an inner city where she lives in a single-parent home and is raised by her mother. Feeling the want of Baby Bear’s idyllic suburban life, this character has no voice of her own and no color in her existence. Having wandered out of her world and into his, Goldilocks roams through his home, sees how the other h...more
Livash Ramduth
A modern take on the traditional Goldilocks and the Three Bears but tells two stories at the same time; one in word form and the other in picture form. The picture form is about a young girl who goes out shopping with her mum and gets lost in rough part of town. She finds the three bears’ house and once inside follows the story; eats porridge, breaks baby bear’s chair and falls asleep in its bed. The word form is Baby Bear’s story, and the upset on finding a stranger in the house. When I read th...more
Brittany
This version of Goldilocks and the three bears is very interesting. In this story it tells two separate stories. One story is about how a little bear and his family go to take a walk at the park while they wait for their porridge to cool down. The second story is about a little girl who ends up getting lost and stumbles upon the three bears house. Then the two stories collide when the little girl tries the porridge, chairs, and beds. Just like the original story the three bears come home to find...more
Kristan
The illustrations are gorgeous... and the written story is pretty much just Goldilocks and the Three Bears, no real surprises on that front (except the last line, which is a little more sad than the fable makes it out to be). However, the difficulty of understanding the story in the illustrations is what knocks a star off. Following Goldilocks, this seemingly lonely girl, with no words, her story is a little unsettling. I think it would be difficult for a child to understand all the subtext in t...more
Davina
What an interesting Goldilocks and the Three Bears...
Each left page, which illustrates Goldilocks--who appears to live near a rough neighborhood--are introduced as "snapshots" into her life: Goldilocks trudging through the streets, walking by shattered windows, bundling herself with her sweater against the cold wind. The "pictures" are black and white with just a hint of the red color of Goldilocks's hair peaking out beneath her hood.
Each right page is colorfully and youthfully illustrated, sho...more
Becky
This would be a really good book to read one-on-one with a child who knows the story of Goldilocks. On the right side, you have the classic story, as told by Baby Bear. And on the left side, you see Goldilocks' actions in small, wordless panels, colorless except for her bright hair. You see that she is out on a drab city street with her mother when she follows a balloon and gets lost. Things are looking pretty scary until she comes upon the Bears' blindingly yellow house. The rest, of course, is...more
Sarah Souther
This is the story of Goldilocks from Baby Bear's point of view. Sort of. On one side of the page, we see color images of him with his happy middle class bear family. On the other side, we see black and white drawings of Goldilocks in a hoodie, getting separated from her mother and wandering about somewhat seedy parts of a city. She sees the bright house and takes refuge there. The bears are shocked at this invasion and Golilocks runs away, ultimately finding her mother. This is a fabulous (fable...more
Canadian Reader
A modern take on the Goldilocks story, presented as two alternating narratives in two completely different styles of art.
Allison Parker
A completely original take on "Goldilocks and the Three Bears." Little Bear tells this story with childlike honesty. While his story is illustrated with a similarly bright and innocent style on each page to the right, the reader experiences the nearly-monochromatic, wordless panels that depict Goldilocks' story on the left. Here we see a modern child in a gritty, urban landscape. She's not looking for trouble by trespassing on the Bears' property; she's lost, frightened, seeking comfort and refu...more
Paula
An urban retelling of the classic Goldilocks and the Three Bears story, told from the baby bear's perspective. -
Robin
The story of Goldilocks and the three bears, told as two parallel stories. Goldilocks is in black and white, and wordless. When she chases a balloon down the street, she becomes separated from her mother. The bears' story maintains the traditional story line in bright, warm, comforting colors. The bears house is an inviting sunny yellow -- it's no wonder a little lost girls is drawn to the place. When the bears discover Goldilocks in bed the characters appear in each other's worlds. A neat conce...more
Ian
Finally, someone dares to imagine Goldilocks coming from a lower-class family. (Rolls eyes.)
Laura
A wonderful and modern twist on the classic Three Bears fairy tale. The 3 bears leave their steaming porridge and go for a walk. Meanwhile, Goldilocks, whose parallel story is told in black and white panels, discovers the bears' home. She eats the porridge, tries the chairs, and falls asleep in the littlest bear's bed. In a clever twist, the bears are shown from Goldilock's perspective. She runs home, finds her mother, and everything ends well. I really like this version of the book and think it...more
Anne
My Favourite Anthony Browne book for using in the classroom is Voices in the Park but this looks like becoming another favourite. The traditional tale of Goldilocks and the Three Bears has been urbanised, no longer is the setting a deep, dark wood. There are two contrasting stories. Goldilock’s is told in a wordless graphic style, the dreary greys matching her version of events. On the other hand the bears’ house and story is filled with sunshine and light. There is a neat twist to the end which...more
Brandi North
This would be a really good book to read one-on-one with a child who knows the story of Goldilocks.

This book tells two stories at one time, from goldilocks and from the Three Bears point of view. One story is about how a little bear and his family go to take a walk at the park while they wait for their porridge to cool down. The second story is about a little girl who ends up getting lost and stumbles upon the three bears house. Then both stories become one!

Very cute! Illustrations are very...more
Bridget R. Wilson
You know the story--three bears and that blond girl, porridge, chairs, and beds. In this version, we discover that the bears and the girl have a story to tell and their stories just happen to meet and mingle.

What I thought: Definitely a new take on an old favorite. The minimal text of the bears' story and the wordlessness of the girl's makes this perfect for preschoolers. The illustrations are great. I like he contrast between the bears (light) and the girl (dark).

Story Time Theme: Fairy Tales

Mia Balsamo
PB40: A great spin off the classic Goldilocks and the Three Bears. I thought the illustrations were great! I thought it was interesting that they set the book in a town and that Goldilocks is not just a girl who is walking through the woods and stumbled upon a nice house, she is a girl who lives in a bad area who possibly lives in poverty and eats the food because she does not know when she will get her next meal. It is a great look into impoverished childrens lives.
Denise
This is a unique take on the Goldilocks story. Browne puts Goldilocks in a gray-scale, real-world atmosphere juxtaposed with the three bears and their pastel, bright, cheery surroundings on each double-page spread. The Goldilocks side of things is done in a wordless picture book fashion, while the narration and dialogue takes place on the bears' side. This would be great one-on-one where a child (familiar with the story) can narrate what Goldilocks is doing.

Karlie Bevan
This book is very unique! It tells the story of Goldilocks and the three bears but with a twist. While reading this book you read about the bears point of view, and on the left page you only get pictures of what is going on in the bears house while they are away. The pictures are in comic form, which I find very interesting. I like this book because it gives children a chance to interpret what is happening just by looking at pictures.
The Styling Librarian
Me and You – A Thought-provoking take on the Goldilocks story by Anthony Browne – What a surprising, beautiful retelling of Goldilocks and the Three Bears. Pretty refreshing and beautiful. I love how Anthony Browne creates these alternate universes where you can crawl through a tunnel or run down an alleyway through an imagined gateway to an alternate universe. I find this author/illustrator simply fascinating.
Mariah Smith
Modern twist on Goldilocks, of course... this book was a bit disappointing in its scattered comic-book frame layout. The artwork and tone may be more appealing to teenagers or adults than children. There is still opportunity to examine different points of view, and it can make another interesting fractured fairy tale in your collection, although I don't think it will get as much attention as several others.
Kate Hastings
Grades 2-5 This book really makes you think. Goldilocks story is told on the left side in dark sepia sketches. She comes from a rough part of town and gets lost... The bears are colorfully illustrated and live in a nice middle class home. They are out for a walk in the park.

We all know the bears find Goldilocks in their house, and Goldi is painted as a villian. But maybe she's not the villian.
Laura Salas
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Gervy
My toddler is definitely not ready for this. An alternative version of Goldilocks: the three bears are pampered and disconnected; Goldilocks is a waify inner-city girl who gets separated from her presumably single mother. Lost and cold and hungry she stumbles upon the "cottage" of the three bears (one of those "Escape to the Country"-type cottages which is in fact a large and comfortable home).
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Librarian Note: There is more than one author in the GoodReads database with this name. See this thread for more information.

Anthony Browne, a Hans Christian Andersen Medalist, is the author-illustrator of many acclaimed books for children, including SILLY BILLY and LITTLE BEAUTY. He lives in Kent, England.
More about Anthony Browne...
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