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Me and You

3.92  ·  Rating Details ·  343 Ratings  ·  90 Reviews
A small bear goes for a stroll in the park with his parents, leaving their bowls of porridge cooling on the kitchen table. Meanwhile, a girl with golden hair is hopelessly lost in a big, frightening city when she comes across a house with the door left invitingly open. Inside are three bowls of porridge in the kitchen, three chairs in the living room, and three ...more
Hardcover, 32 pages
Published October 26th 2010 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR) (first published 2009)
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Shifa Ahmed
May 03, 2012 Shifa Ahmed rated it really liked it
'Me and You' By Anthony Browne

A modern take on the traditional Goldilocks and the Three Bears but tells two stories at the same time; one in word form and the other in picture form.
The picture form is about a young girl who goes out shopping with her mum and gets lost in rough part of town. She finds the three bears’ house and once inside follows the story; eats porridge, breaks baby bear’s chair and falls asleep in its bed. The word form is Baby Bear’s story, and the upset on finding a strange
...more
Candice
May 01, 2011 Candice rated it really liked it
Recommends it for: Sophie - when she's older
Shelves: picture-books
A re-telling of Goldilocks and the Three Bears from the points of both Goldilocks and the bears. The left page of each two-page spread is a wordless series of small black and white (except for the yellow hair) pictures of Goldilocks. The right page is done in color and has the traditional story narrated by Baby Bear. The style of the illustrations is also different. The ones for Goldilocks are almost photographic while the ones of the bears are childish color pencil drawings. The setting is ...more
Rebecca
This would be a really good book to read one-on-one with a child who knows the story of Goldilocks. On the right side, you have the classic story, as told by Baby Bear. And on the left side, you see Goldilocks' actions in small, wordless panels, colorless except for her bright hair. You see that she is out on a drab city street with her mother when she follows a balloon and gets lost. Things are looking pretty scary until she comes upon the Bears' blindingly yellow house. The rest, of course, is ...more
Sarah
Oct 10, 2012 Sarah rated it really liked it
Shelves: picture-books
I like the way this version of the classic "Goldilocks" forces us to think about Goldie's motivation to go into the bears' house in the first place. Here, she's lonely and clearly from a rough side of town. We see her side of the story through black and white panels, whereas the bears are shown in large colorful and scenes, their familial love evident.

This would make a good mentor text for point of view.
Emma
I like it a lot, the little girl part of the story is great, but it's a little difficult to read aloud. You have to kind of decide if you are going to verbally address the parallel story beyond the text, and if you do, you unbalance the sequence of events of the bears discovering the food, chairs etc. It's very ambitious, humanist and largely successful. Spoiler: I also really like that she finds her mum again. My child is probably a little bit young, at 2 and a bit.
Angela
May 08, 2010 Angela rated it it was amazing
Shelves: picture-books
Anthony Browne is clearly a genius. His picture book talents seem limitless. And his newest arrival to the States does not disappoint.

This is Goldilocks like you've never seen her before. Browne's new perspectives on the story are layered and enchanted. The lore and urban setting will change you're imaginings forever.
Kelley Blakslee
Sep 19, 2016 Kelley Blakslee rated it really liked it
"Me and You" is a retelling of the classic Goldilocks and the Three Bears story. In Browne's version, we get Baby Bear's point of view, with side-by-side illustrations showing what Baby Bear and his family are doing versus what Goldilocks is doing. To illustrate the Bears' life, Browne uses bright pastels and soft lines. The images of the bears are either on completely white or very pleasant backgrounds, like the park or the inside of their home. In contrast, Browne uses harsh lines and sepia ...more
Lindsay
Sep 24, 2016 Lindsay rated it liked it
This book was a spin-off of Goldilocks and the Three Bears. It displayed the perspective of the three bears while they were out and simultaneously showed what Goldilocks was up to in their home with a display of pictures. I enjoyed that it told two stories at once, but in different ways--one with words and one without. It was a very readable text, which would be ideal for young or beginning readers, however, for older students it also opens the door for deeper discussions about others' ...more
Jailah Gamble
Sep 24, 2015 Jailah Gamble rated it really liked it
“Me and you” by Anthony Browne Is based on the story of the “Golidelocks and the Three Bears” but it shows the view of the bear’s side. The story starts off with the Momma bear making porridge for the family. The porridge is too hot so the Momma, Papa, and little bear go for a walk. During their walk a little girl steps into their house trying out the Bear’s porridge, sitting in their chairs, and even their beds. Sooner or later the Bears come home to find the little girl in the little Bear’s ...more
Katie Fitzgerald
Me and You finally gives a voice to poor, frightened Goldilocks, and some backstory, too. Though the story is told in the traditional way, from Baby Bear's point of view on the recto (the right side of each page), illustrations on the verso (the left) depict Goldilocks's life, and the circumstances that inform her decision to break into the bears' house in the first place.

This is not the first time an author has given us the other side of a story - most noteably Jon Sciezska and Lane Smith gave
...more
Tasha
Jan 27, 2011 Tasha rated it it was amazing
Shelves: picture-books
This is a version of Goldilocks that is sure to make readers think. The story of Goldilocks is told opposite that of the Bear family. Goldilocks comes from a rough part of town, complete with broken windows and graffiti. After chasing a balloon that gets away, she finds herself in front of the Bears’ home. It’s a pretty yellow home, obviously comfortably middle class. The Bears have headed out for a walk in the neighboring park, chatting about work, the home and the car. When they return, they ...more
Devi Henn
This book is a re-creation of Goldilocks. I did not think it was a very good rendition; the ending was slightly different.
However this book could be related through English. You could have the students act out the book with a play. They could rewrite the story from Goldilocks' point of view. Make a list of similarities between this version and the original Goldilocks. Which do the students prefer? And why?
Chantal
Sep 23, 2014 Chantal rated it liked it
Shelves: anthony-browne
Me and You (2009) by Anthony Browne is “an enchanting new take on the Goldilocks story” (front cover). Browne creates parallel narratives—one that is visually dominant, the other textual with illustrations.

His story of the Bear family stays true to form. While waiting for just-made porridge to cool, the family goes out for a stroll. Upon returning they are alerted to the presence of an intruder who ate porridge, broke a chair, and was sleeping in their bed. The bear family’s illustrations, done

...more
Christina Taylor
Aug 02, 2012 Christina Taylor rated it it was amazing
Shelves: picturebooks
In a double narrative, Me and You is a transformation of the fairy tale Goldilocks and the Three Bears. In wordless sepia toned illustrations, Browne depicts Goldilocks’ origin story set in an inner city where she lives in a single-parent home and is raised by her mother. Feeling the want of Baby Bear’s idyllic suburban life, this character has no voice of her own and no color in her existence. Having wandered out of her world and into his, Goldilocks roams through his home, sees how the other ...more
Sarah Ravel
Sep 24, 2014 Sarah Ravel rated it really liked it
In the picturebook Me and You, Anthony Browne merges realistic fiction with fairy tale in a new take on Goldilocks and Three Bears. The three bears in the story stay fairly true to the conventions of the fairy tale, with the slight twist that they live in a modern day city. However, they are always illustrated in bright colors and are softly drawn, reminding of the types of images one might see in a baby's room. The images of Goldilocks are quite different. they are all in dark sepia tones. ...more
Livash Ramduth
Jun 22, 2013 Livash Ramduth rated it really liked it
A modern take on the traditional Goldilocks and the Three Bears but tells two stories at the same time; one in word form and the other in picture form. The picture form is about a young girl who goes out shopping with her mum and gets lost in rough part of town. She finds the three bears’ house and once inside follows the story; eats porridge, breaks baby bear’s chair and falls asleep in its bed. The word form is Baby Bear’s story, and the upset on finding a stranger in the house. When I read ...more
Brittany
Feb 27, 2012 Brittany rated it really liked it
This version of Goldilocks and the three bears is very interesting. In this story it tells two separate stories. One story is about how a little bear and his family go to take a walk at the park while they wait for their porridge to cool down. The second story is about a little girl who ends up getting lost and stumbles upon the three bears house. Then the two stories collide when the little girl tries the porridge, chairs, and beds. Just like the original story the three bears come home to find ...more
Kristan
Mar 22, 2011 Kristan rated it really liked it
Shelves: 2011, kids, picture-books
The illustrations are gorgeous... and the written story is pretty much just Goldilocks and the Three Bears, no real surprises on that front (except the last line, which is a little more sad than the fable makes it out to be). However, the difficulty of understanding the story in the illustrations is what knocks a star off. Following Goldilocks, this seemingly lonely girl, with no words, her story is a little unsettling. I think it would be difficult for a child to understand all the subtext in ...more
Erin Buhr
Sep 16, 2014 Erin Buhr rated it really liked it
Anthony Browne creatively illustrates the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears to explore the two sides to this familiar story. On one side of each page, soft colorful drawings tell the story of the little bear and his family. They make breakfast, go for a stroll in the park and come back to a surprise. On the other pages, he tells the story of a little girl with red hair. These are illustrated with darker colors and wordlessly tell the story of a little girl who follows a balloon, gets ...more
Davina
Nov 09, 2010 Davina rated it really liked it
What an interesting Goldilocks and the Three Bears...
Each left page, which illustrates Goldilocks--who appears to live near a rough neighborhood--are introduced as "snapshots" into her life: Goldilocks trudging through the streets, walking by shattered windows, bundling herself with her sweater against the cold wind. The "pictures" are black and white with just a hint of the red color of Goldilocks's hair peaking out beneath her hood.
Each right page is colorfully and youthfully illustrated, sho
...more
Kim
Feb 17, 2015 Kim rated it liked it
Shelves: children-s-lit
Anthony Browne's retelling of Goldilocks and the Three Bears simultaneously tells the same story from the perspective of the girl and of the youngest bear. Goldilocks (though never referred to by this name) is mostly seen in small, monochromatic pictures without captions that depict her as a bit depressed. On the other hand, the little bear and his family are in large, colorful illustrations. This juxtaposition highlights the idea that this particular retelling centers around the little bear's ...more
Courtney Watson
Sep 24, 2014 Courtney Watson rated it liked it
The book Me and You is a book with very few words in it. It starts by telling the story, but then the pictures take over the story. It's a retelling of Goldilocks and the Three Bears from the perspective of the Three Bears. It creates a more modern feel as the family of bears live in an urban area in a very nice house. The pictures show some bright colors for the bear family, but for the little girl there are much darker colors used, and no words. Again Anthony Browne uses borders around ...more
Sarah Souther
Feb 09, 2011 Sarah Souther rated it really liked it
This is the story of Goldilocks from Baby Bear's point of view. Sort of. On one side of the page, we see color images of him with his happy middle class bear family. On the other side, we see black and white drawings of Goldilocks in a hoodie, getting separated from her mother and wandering about somewhat seedy parts of a city. She sees the bright house and takes refuge there. The bears are shocked at this invasion and Golilocks runs away, ultimately finding her mother. This is a fabulous ...more
Shoaa Aljohani
Sep 21, 2014 Shoaa Aljohani rated it it was amazing
This short picture book, a charming retake on the story of Goldilocks, looks at things from "Baby Bear's" perspective. Its simple, clean presentation, often done in an elegant play on comic book style sequential pictures covering entire portions of the story, is quite successful in creating an innocent, very simple adventure. Its medium of full-color oil paints works well in a story mostly dominated by images, although its interwoven text is used very well throughout the book, interspersed with ...more
Allison Parker
May 15, 2011 Allison Parker rated it it was amazing
A completely original take on "Goldilocks and the Three Bears." Little Bear tells this story with childlike honesty. While his story is illustrated with a similarly bright and innocent style on each page to the right, the reader experiences the nearly-monochromatic, wordless panels that depict Goldilocks' story on the left. Here we see a modern child in a gritty, urban landscape. She's not looking for trouble by trespassing on the Bears' property; she's lost, frightened, seeking comfort and ...more
Bridget R. Wilson
You know the story--three bears and that blond girl, porridge, chairs, and beds. In this version, we discover that the bears and the girl have a story to tell and their stories just happen to meet and mingle.

What I thought: Definitely a new take on an old favorite. The minimal text of the bears' story and the wordlessness of the girl's makes this perfect for preschoolers. The illustrations are great. I like he contrast between the bears (light) and the girl (dark).

Story Time Theme: Fairy Tales

Robin
The story of Goldilocks and the three bears, told as two parallel stories. Goldilocks is in black and white, and wordless. When she chases a balloon down the street, she becomes separated from her mother. The bears' story maintains the traditional story line in bright, warm, comforting colors. The bears house is an inviting sunny yellow -- it's no wonder a little lost girls is drawn to the place. When the bears discover Goldilocks in bed the characters appear in each other's worlds. A neat ...more
Brandi North
This would be a really good book to read one-on-one with a child who knows the story of Goldilocks.

This book tells two stories at one time, from goldilocks and from the Three Bears point of view. One story is about how a little bear and his family go to take a walk at the park while they wait for their porridge to cool down. The second story is about a little girl who ends up getting lost and stumbles upon the three bears house. Then both stories become one!

Very cute! Illustrations are very
...more
Laura
Sep 24, 2011 Laura rated it really liked it
Shelves: children-s, 2011, picture
A wonderful and modern twist on the classic Three Bears fairy tale. The 3 bears leave their steaming porridge and go for a walk. Meanwhile, Goldilocks, whose parallel story is told in black and white panels, discovers the bears' home. She eats the porridge, tries the chairs, and falls asleep in the littlest bear's bed. In a clever twist, the bears are shown from Goldilock's perspective. She runs home, finds her mother, and everything ends well. I really like this version of the book and think it ...more
Anne
Sep 28, 2012 Anne rated it it was amazing
Shelves: picture-book
My Favourite Anthony Browne book for using in the classroom is Voices in the Park but this looks like becoming another favourite. The traditional tale of Goldilocks and the Three Bears has been urbanised, no longer is the setting a deep, dark wood. There are two contrasting stories. Goldilock’s is told in a wordless graphic style, the dreary greys matching her version of events. On the other hand the bears’ house and story is filled with sunshine and light. There is a neat twist to the end which ...more
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Librarian Note: There is more than one author in the GoodReads database with this name. See this thread for more information.

Anthony Browne, a Hans Christian Andersen Medalist, is the author-illustrator of many acclaimed books for children, including SILLY BILLY and LITTLE BEAUTY. He lives in Kent, England.
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