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Good Value: Reflections on Money, Morality and an Uncertain World
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Good Value: Reflections on Money, Morality and an Uncertain World

3.33  ·  Rating Details  ·  63 Ratings  ·  14 Reviews
Can one be both an ethical person and an effective businessperson? Stephen Green, an ordained priest and the chairman of HSBC, thinks so. In "Good Value," Green retraces the history of the global economy and its financial systems, and shows that while the marketplace has delivered huge advantages to humanity, it has also abandoned over a billion people to extreme poverty, ...more
ebook, 256 pages
Published February 1st 2011 by Grove Press (first published July 2nd 2009)
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E
Nov 02, 2009 E rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
New economy raises new questions

Depending on your perspective, HSBC Chairman Stephen Green’s analysis of the global economy and the moral ambiguities that will inevitably shape society’s evolution is either brilliant or convoluted. It may be both. Readers will applaud Green’s intellect as he draws from fertile philosophical, literary and religious sources to frame his take on civilization’s economic beginnings and development. The one drawback is that his obsession with detail and stylistic pro
...more
Edward Cahyadi
Dec 30, 2015 Edward Cahyadi rated it really liked it
Shelves: philosophy, economics
Good Value presents a very insightful view on Capitalism and encourages us to ask the age-old question: what is progress and toward what end are we progressing?

As readers flip through the pages of this eye-opening narrative, they would inevitably learn of Green's wealth of literary and historical knowledge, inserted generously throughout the book in an attempt to reinforce his views. This is ironically however, where I feel the book falls short. The multitude of references to literature and his
...more
Jeffrey
Jan 16, 2010 Jeffrey rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Written as a conscientious apologetic for the financial industry following the disastrous aftermath of the Great Recession, Green's book is timely and acute.

While there are a good many different themes intertwined in Green's thesis (value of business (especially banking); (true) value of money; role of money; eradication of poverty; ethics; climate change...etc), I was struck upon first read that Green should have explored the themes covered in the latter half of the book a little more than to g
...more
Munro
Feb 09, 2011 Munro rated it liked it
This was the first book that I read entirely in electronic format on my Kindle or various Kindle reader applications. I like the ease of use and versatility offered by such electronic books.

Good Value was an interesting book that was assigned reading for the Finance class I am taking as part of the UVU MBA program. The author has an extensive financial background and he writes about the unraveling of the economy and some of the key underlying causes of that. He relates business and life to true
...more
Ben
Apr 11, 2010 Ben rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
It's refreshing to find someone taking an earnest look at the mix of money and morality. The obvious link to Faust is matched by an unexpected and, I think, strained analogy between globalization and grace. His history of the financial crisis is cogent, and his history of commerce is interesting, but his personal musings probably a little too discursive.

The most noteworthy part for me was Green's take on the morality of the Old Testament:
The story of the people in the Old Testament is the story
...more
E
Apr 05, 2010 E rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
New economy raises new questions

Depending on your perspective, HSBC Chairman Stephen Green’s analysis of the global economy and the moral ambiguities that will inevitably shape society’s evolution is either brilliant or convoluted. It may be both. Readers will applaud Green’s intellect as he draws from fertile philosophical, literary and religious sources to frame his take on civilization’s economic beginnings and development. The one drawback is that his obsession with detail and stylistic pro
...more
Stan Lanier
Some remarkable views, considering his position as chairman of HSBC. I'm not quite sure he can get to all of the end points for which he strives given some of his definitions. While I could be wrong, it seems he equates capitalism with commerce, and, then, naturalizes that as instinct. He does, however, advocate for a strong role of government because economics tries to dominate social structures, and he, fully I think, does not believe that markets will self correct and reach stability necessar ...more
Greg Talbot
Jul 23, 2012 Greg Talbot rated it it was ok
There are enough T.S. Eliot allusions than I ever care for in any book. But that boring poet aside, Green brings well known literary works (Goethe, Hesse) into his refletions all the time. There is nothing wrong with that, but i'm not sure he every dives beyond the surface of the typical themes. I didn't like how the book was written, and it feels like a lesser "The World is Flat" by Thomas Friedman. But I commend Green's effort, he is well read, and is putting some personal thoughts to these br ...more
Karen
Not a bad book at all but SO disappointing - the CEO in England of HBOS who is also an Anglican priest SHOULD have produced something far more challenging than a defence of western capitalism on the basis that it is 'innate' and therefore 'good'. If you want to read a thorough, if unquestioning, history of western markets then this is fine, if the words 'morality' and 'value' in the title draw you then don't bother, there is more 'Faust' here than Jesus.
Geraldine
May 05, 2016 Geraldine rated it liked it
I read this for a summer book club and I found the book OK. I really wouldn't tout the this work as a must-read for anyone in particular, but perhaps for those who are interested in ethics, history, and happen to work in financial services. It may give some food for thought.
Mike Steinharter
Pretty deep for a banker. I got good value from much of this book, and took some notes along the way. Thought-provoking regarding compartmentalization (don't we all) globalization and the financial crisis. A bit preachy at the end, but that's okay.
Ratforce
Another recent release with a focus on ethics is very timely. Its application of ethics in the banking and finance industries addresses an issue at the forefront of many people’s minds.
James Mak
may pick it up one day. stephen green perhaps too used to one way communication that most are listeners to him .
Shinynickel
Apr 21, 2010 Shinynickel marked it as to-read  ·  review of another edition
Off this review - argue in favor of globalization: http://www.tnr.com/book/review/the-ba...
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