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Evangelical Theology: An Introduction

3.99  ·  Rating Details ·  487 Ratings  ·  40 Reviews
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Kindle Edition, 219 pages
Published (first published November 30th 1962)
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(showing 1-30)
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James
Apr 19, 2014 James rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: theology
I would love to call myself a Barthian. I love people of his school: Yoder (though I have qualms about his sexual-predator-tendencies), Hauerwas, Willimon, Webster, McCormack, Hart. I also once participated in a reading group that took a slow (50 pages a week) reading of the Dogmatics. However I feel like I haven't read enough Barth to really call myself a Barthian. However I have imbibed his suspicion of subjective religion and affirm his christocentric theology.

This is a good, if rambling boo
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Chris Clark
Jul 16, 2013 Chris Clark rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: theology
Recently I had the interest in reading Barth, so I attempted his Church Dogmatics. After a failed attempt to understand his writing, a friend recommended starting with Evangelical Theology...and a great recommendation it was!

This book was a great reminder of what the goal of theology is and who it is about. Barth does a great job of reminding us of the active living God, the Jesus who is always on the move, lest we confine him to static human laws, principles, and ideas. I think it's such a poi
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Adam Shields
Jan 16, 2011 Adam Shields rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Short review: this is a relatively short, dense and interesting series of lectures of what is means to be a theologian from one of the most important theologians of the 20th century. I am sure I missed more than I got because it very dense (and I listened to it). I plan on reading it again in print form later.

I do think it is important to actually read theologians, not just read what other people say about them. Many people will have heard of Karl Barth but very few will have actually read him.

M
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Brent Harris
Jan 19, 2017 Brent Harris rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Some great points to track with Barth on. They certainly illuminate aspects of weakness in our contemporary theological thought. He is hard to follow and long winded at times. Anyone engaging as a church leader should read this as it calls many of our assumptions and practices into question.
Nate Perrin
Jan 18, 2017 Nate Perrin rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: nonfiction
The best introduction to Barth that you could access. Very convicting.
Jim Johnson
First and foremost, this was incredibly boring. I was expecting a very straightforward explanation of theology for evangelicals and I got a lot of redundant, unfounded theorizing. From a literary perspective, I did not appreciate the personification of theology (as if "theology" could think or plan or feel anything). It was almost insulting.

Also, (and I realize the author was discussing evangelical Christian theology, specifically) the insistence that there is a god and the Bible is His Holy wor
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Joshua
At many times while reading this book, I felt lost. The book was far less structured than I am used to, and it is really more an introduction to the importance and method of theology, rather than an introduction to specific theological concepts (christology, soteriology, anthropology, etc.). So perhaps Barth and I missed each other because of my incorrect assumptions about what I'd be reading. Perhaps it's also due to the fact that these lectures are a distillation of his however-many-volume Chu ...more
Nathan Moore
4.5 stars. I've never read anything like Barth. He is profound, lyrical, precise. Every sentence matters. This book has had a notable impact on my understanding of life and the practice of Christian ministry. God used Barth to help breath a fresh air of humility, seriousness, caution, and devotion into all of my theological thoughts. This is the best book I've read all year. It felt as if all oh his thoughts were original or at least fresh. I especially benefited from his chapters on Temptation, ...more
Ben De Bono
Dec 13, 2011 Ben De Bono rated it it was amazing
Shelves: theology
The descriptor "must-read" is perhaps overused (including by me) when it comes to books, but in this case it absolutely applies. This is one of the most powerful, profound and practical pieces of theological writing I've come across. Barth achieves the rare quality of writing material that is highly applicable to the novice theologian, the pastor, the student, the highly experienced theologian and everyone in between. Especially valuable are his sections on what it means to be a theologian and t ...more
Dráusio Gonçalves
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
William
Jul 01, 2012 William rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: theology
Barth bietet einen großartigen Überblick über die Theologie der Theologie. Vier Abschnitte erläutern die Stelle der Theologie, die Existenz der Theologie, Gefahren für die Theologie, und die Arbeit der Theologie. Es gibt nur wenige Bücher über die ontologischen Aspekt der Theologie. Dieser ist wiederum hervorragend. Am überraschendsten war für mich nur, wie erbaulich Barths Optimismus dieses Buch macht. Als Theologe Ich finde es einfach, in Pessimismus rutschen, wenn ich so viele schlechte Theol ...more
Nathan
Oct 25, 2009 Nathan rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: aquinas-library
"Theology" has become something of a dirty word in today's user-friendly, seeker-sensitive, feel-don't-rationalize age. Barth's theology, though, is nearly an anti-theology; not a box for your thinking, but a springboard for your imagination. He doesn't fudge the fundamentals (thank goodness) but he presents them in a way that is at once functionally practical and aesthetically beautiful. And it is beautiful, this theo-logos, because its Aim and Object is the primogenitor of beauty. This is the ...more
Jenn Cavanaugh
Aug 27, 2007 Jenn Cavanaugh rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: theologians - that means you
Theology is primarily an exercise in NOT knowing everything. The only way to become an expert on God is to domesticate and miniaturize God, in which case we're no longer talking about God. Humility, diligence and perseverance are the virtues the theologian seeks to cultivate. The entire enterprise is based on faith, hope, love and the Spirit - none of which is ours to command. Just as it requires thinking like a hero to be a decent human being, it requires thinking like a theologian to live like ...more
John
Sep 26, 2013 John rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Barth's book does an excellent job articulating the nature of the theological task, while offering a specific context within which that task should be completed. I appreciate most the devotional and pastoral orientation of Barth's advice to the theologian, as he always honors the proclamation of the Word as essential to the theological process. He also does well to highlight the communal elements of the theological process, that no theology is done well outside the context of the Christian commu ...more
Christopher Smith
Deep and potent. This was my first foray into Barth and as a former professor of mine encouraged me as I began, "it seeps more than it splashes." Often I found myself reading over a passage several times to allow the density of the thought to filter through my somewhat hard head. No doubt the best parts of the book will be determined by where the reader is in their journey of theological reflection and study but for my money chapters 4, 7 10 and 13 are the best in their respective sections.
Doug Browne
Jun 10, 2014 Doug Browne rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Don't confuse "evangelical" as Barth uses the term, meaning having to do with the Good News and the Bible, with "evangelical" as many modern people use the term, meaning a particular political and theological worldview. You will be disappointed if you do.
Barth is concerned with the theology that comes from meeting the God who is present in the witness of the Scriptures, and from relationship with that God, as opposed to the various gods we make for ourselves.
Matthew Richey
This is valuable and I appreciate it - it made me think and re-examine myself. It is, however, a very dense read (for me anyway) and I don't feel as if it makes the best read (this was originally a series of lectures). The second half of the book was better than the first and there is much to be gleaned here. I will return to Barth - but I'll probably wait until the summer when I feel I can more fully focus as I read.
Kara Slade
May 11, 2011 Kara Slade rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I love Karl Barth. Love, love, love him. But, I'll have to say, I love the later Barth a little bit less than the early, _Epistle to the Romans_ crisis-theology Barth. Out of everything we read in my Barth seminar, this was definitely my least favorite. That being said, it's still better than 95% of other 20th century theology.
David
Feb 29, 2016 David rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Sorry to say but the book was wasted on me. I couldn't get over his continued use of the word science in relation to Theology. And, with each statement to defend that use, he further proved that he had no idea what it means to be a science. It was interesting. I learned about what he thought was important for a person who studied theology.
Edward Cooper
Dec 08, 2012 Edward Cooper rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2013
In his final lecture on "Love," Barth, in his own words, plus a short quote from Luther, sums up what this work meant to me.

Barth writes, "And since he is our Sovereign Lord, what Luther said about the Word of God holds true for Agape. It is 'a passing thunderstorm' that bursts at one moment here and at a other moment elsewhere."

Zen Hess
Jan 02, 2015 Zen Hess rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Karl Barth is the jam. This book is a compilation of a few lectures he shared at the University of Chicago and Princeton while he was in America. "Wonder" is a significant chapter, one that I will share with anyone who is investing in theological study. Barth's style can be a bit difficult, but it is worth the journey. I look forward to reading more Barth in the future.
Perry
Dec 05, 2009 Perry rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I'm not sure how much of this I understood when I first read it, but I'm grateful for being introduced to Barth. His thoughts on faith and the Word of God being unassailable are foundational for me now.
Markus
This was another re-read for a study and discussion group but, every time I read Barth's "Evangelical Theology" my appreciation grows for this short, accessible, well-organized, and excellent work (and I do recommend reading this work more than once)...
Andrew
Aug 14, 2012 Andrew rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Central theme of knowing God in Jesus Christ. Barth is very strong in his Christology which comes through in these lectures. This book has given me a good 'taste' of Barth before I work my way through his church dogmatics.
Brian Eshleman
Oct 03, 2015 Brian Eshleman rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I found the work engaging rather than dry, conveying the wonder and humility that flows from the author's heart. This is an invitation to theology rather than a self-confident pronouncement of everything one is likely to encounter there.
Katherine francis
So far this book has said a lot of what I already know and believe but in the most abstract, philosophical, and wordy way possible-on earth. Until I start reading more theology. But you know, I have to know my Karl before I can go to Princeton Theological Seminary.
Bill Taylor
Oct 29, 2015 Bill Taylor rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: scanned-and-read
Complied from lectures given in America at the end of Barth's life. Concise, lucid, insightful, inspirational. A real joy to read.
Tj Lawson
Oct 17, 2012 Tj Lawson rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I will have to reread this. It is thick, but very rich.
Joe Spencer
This book is almost (emphasis on almost) a somewhat more sophisticated version of Lewis' _Mere Christianity_.
Mike (the Paladin)
I have to move this back to the 'to be read" list as I barely started it at all and it has to go back to the library...will have to get it back.
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  • The Hauerwas Reader
  • A Little Exercise for Young Theologians
  • On the Holy Spirit
  • The Christian Tradition 3: The Growth of Medieval Theology 600-1300
  • The Gospel in a Pluralist Society
  • The Nature of Doctrine
  • The Crucified God: The Cross of Christ as the Foundation and Criticism of Christian Theology
  • Philosophy for Understanding Theology
  • The Mediation of Christ
  • The Moral Vision of the New Testament: Community, Cross, New CreationA Contemporary Introduction to New Testament Ethic
  • The Trinity
  • The Major Works
  • Paul: In Fresh Perspective
  • The Politics of Jesus
  • The Bible Made Impossible: Why Biblicism Is Not a Truly Evangelical Reading of Scripture
  • Who's Afraid of Postmodernism?: Taking Derrida, Lyotard, and Foucault to Church (The Church and Postmodern Culture)
  • Theology for the Community of God
  • Basic Theological Writings
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Karl Barth (pronounced "bart") was a Swiss Reformed theologian whom critics hold to be among the most important Christian thinkers of the 20th century; Pope Pius XII described him as the most important theologian since Thomas Aquinas. Beginning with his experience as a pastor, he rejected his training in the predominant liberal theology typical of 19th-century Protestantism, especially German.

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