In the Palaces of Memory: How We Build the Worlds Inside Our Heads
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In the Palaces of Memory: How We Build the Worlds Inside Our Heads

3.64 of 5 stars 3.64  ·  rating details  ·  39 ratings  ·  4 reviews
Even as you read these words, a tiny portion of your brain is physically changing. New connections are being sprouted--a circuit that will create a stab of recognition if you encounter the words again. That is one of the theories of memory presented in this intriguing and splendidly readable book, which distills three researchers' inquiries into the processes that enable u...more
Paperback, 272 pages
Published March 3rd 1992 by Vintage (first published 1991)
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Judith
Have you ever wondered exactly how we learn? How we remember? Remembering, of course, is a crucial part of learning. This book takes us deeply into the realm of neuroscience, into the brain itself, and particularly into those synapses that fire (or don't) from time to time.

As yet, the exact mechanism for remembering has not been found, but various disciplines have been merging toward a common conclusion. The persons studying the science of memory have come from neuroscience, biology, physics, an...more
Elizabeth Blake
This was an interesting book combining science of neuro-anatomy with theories of memory. At the end the author states: "Memory works that way. The first time you tell someone about your trip"...."it has become trivialized. Raw experience has been converted into a few set pieces." The book has helped me ponder memories that were hugely influential in my life, but cannot be adequately handled by my memories of them. That's what I liked best about the book.
Mad Russian the Traveller
This an excellent explanation of the development of neuroscience as it relates to memory in the human brain. The author does a good job of explaining the various concepts and mechanisms for the layman; you don't have to have a degree in Biology or Chemistry to understand the subject related here. A good introduction to the vast field of Cognitive Science in general. Recommended.
Lauren
I really dislike books that attempt to take on a somewhat complicated topic and use a tone that's trying too hard to be conversational or lighthearted.
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George Johnson (born January 20, 1952) is an American journalist and science writer. He is the author of a number of books, including The Ten Most Beautiful Experiments (2008) and Strange Beauty: Murray Gell-Mann and the Revolution in 20th-Century Physics (1999), and writes for a number of publications, including The New York Times.

He is one of the co-hosts (with science writer John Horgan) of "Sc...more
More about George Johnson...
The Ten Most Beautiful Experiments The Cancer Chronicles: Unlocking Medicine's Deepest Mystery A Shortcut Through Time: The Path to the Quantum Computer Strange Beauty: Murray Gell-Mann and the Revolution in Twentieth-Century Physics The Bible and the Bermuda Triangle

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