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Light Blue Reign: How a City Slicker, a Quiet Kansan, and a Mountain Man Built College Basketball's Longest-Lasting Dynasty
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Light Blue Reign: How a City Slicker, a Quiet Kansan, and a Mountain Man Built College Basketball's Longest-Lasting Dynasty

4.04  ·  Rating Details  ·  25 Ratings  ·  5 Reviews
The 09'–10' NCAA college basketball season marks the 100th anniversary of North Carolina basketball. The Tar Heels have earned top-five rankings in preseason polls four of the last five years, twice at #1. But they weren't always seen as a power - house team. Their strength has been decades in the making.
Light Blue Reign documents the building of a program, a behindthe- s
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ebook, 384 pages
Published October 27th 2009 by Thomas Dunne Books (first published 2009)
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Emma
Jan 28, 2016 Emma rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
I've read so many books about North Carolina. It was good, I learned a few new things that I didn't know before: Roy opens Thursday practices to the public. This book took me a while to start, but I finished it relatively quickly.
David
Light Blue Reign: How a City Slicker, a Quiet Kansan, and a Mountain Man Built College Basketball's Longest-Lasting Dynasty by Art Chansky (Thomas Dunne Books 2009)(796.323+/-). Art Chamsky, a newspaper writer in the North Carolina Triangle, has followed Carolina basketball for over thirty years and has served with three different Carolina basketball coaches. His perspective on Carolina hoops begins and ends with the coaches, so that angle is played up in his writing. My rating: 7/10, finished 1 ...more
Dale Stonehouse
Apr 01, 2010 Dale Stonehouse rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This is a nice history of North Carolina basketball going back to the 1950s and giving a good feel of the intensity involved. I have liked other similar books better, mostly because the author gets a little gushy about the recent championship teams he is most familiar with. For Tar Heels fans this certainly would rate five stars.
A.
Jan 31, 2010 A. rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: basketball, 2009
More interesting for the Frank McGuire stuff (previously unknown to me!) than the Dean Smith and Roy Williams stuff (already knew most of that history).
Patrick
Great book on Carolina Basketball History!
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