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Attila: The Judgment (Attila Trilogy #3)

3.90  ·  Rating Details  ·  383 Ratings  ·  31 Reviews
AD 449: the future of the world hangs in the balance. The once mighty Roman Empire lies open and vulnerable to attack from a huge Hunnish army that has gathered on the banks of the Danube and is poised and ready to strike - but only one man has seen the danger.

Master-General Aetius knows Attila still thirsts for blood and destruction, but he is helpless to stop the the pen
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Paperback, 451 pages
Published 2008 by St. Martin's Griffin
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(showing 1-30 of 716)
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Bryn Hammond
Spotty trilogy. From me it’s been four stars—five stars—two stars. But I gave one star free to the first for potential, and perhaps I rob a star from the third for dissatisfaction.

Late in this book, very late, we see into Attila’s mind: by that time he’s defeated and mad. Until then we don’t. No inspirational speeches, as in the second; nothing until mad speeches in the lead-up to his death. Until then he directs a war but he doesn’t talk to us. Our first passage of his thoughts is on p. 395. W
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Paul
This is the final installment in 'Napier's trilogy on one of the most famous non-Roman historical figures.
It starts off reasonably well enough with the siege of Viminacium, a legionary fortress though one which is nevertheless incredibly provincial in comparison to what it would have been like at the apogee of Roman might.
Napier's sporadically used abilities for deep characterisation are at their most evidenced for the characters who feature predominantly in this part of the story - though a nu
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Olethros
-Remate trepidante, fogoso y sangriento a la trilogía.-

Género. Novela Histórica.

Lo que nos cuenta. Sin que nadie se haya dado cuenta, los hunos han atravesado la frontera noreste del Imperio Romano y su asalto sobre Margo no es más que un ejemplo de sus intenciones, que son dejar claro que la petición de Atila de la mitad del imperio no es ninguna broma. Tercer y último volumen de la trilogía Atila.

¿Quiere saber más de este libro, sin spoilers? Visite:

http://librosdeolethros.blogspot.com/...
Jennifer (JC-S)
Dec 13, 2014 Jennifer (JC-S) rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
‘Was this Attila himself?’

449 CE. The final book in the Attila trilogy starts with Attila’s invasion of the Roman Empire, with his ruthless campaign of slaughter in revenge for Roman atrocities. While Attila and his warriors wreak havoc across central Europe, Valentinian in Ravenna, and Theodosius in Constantinople focus on undermining each other while relying on the able but disgraced Roman general Aëtius to save the empire.

‘To think’, Aëtius murmured, shaking his head again, there were once fo
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Redfox5
If you are going to write a trilogy on Attila, maybe you should stick with Attila. I couldn't really understand the big shift in point of view here. I know the tale is being told be that old guy but you can't have us on the side of Attila for two books and then make him the big bad guy for the last one. And thats what happened because I found myself siding with the Romans again. Is it because what Attila was doing was so bad? But then is he really any worst than the Romans or any invading army? ...more
Olethros
-Remate trepidante, fogoso y sangriento a la trilogía.-

Género. Novela Histórica.

Lo que nos cuenta. Sin que nadie se haya dado cuenta, los hunos han atravesado la frontera noreste del Imperio Romano y su asalto sobre Margo no es más que un ejemplo de sus intenciones, que son dejar claro que la petición de Atila de la mitad del imperio no es ninguna broma. Tercer y último volumen de la trilogía Atila.

¿Quiere saber más de este libro, sin spoilers? Visite:

http://librosdeolethros.blogspot.com/...
Brian
Nov 16, 2011 Brian rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I asked for the story to finish strong and it did! The third installment made up for any shortcomings of the second and then some.

What I really liked about this series was the depiction of Atilla; he started out as a sympathetic character with childhood trials that had you rooting for him to suceed in the first book and then the second book was about his "redemption" (for lack of better words) as he comes back from a 30 year exile to unite the tribes to form a vast host to exact his vengeance. T
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Tad
Apr 16, 2011 Tad rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Surprising ending to an excellent trilogy. Napier clearly subscribes to the latest research on the fall of Rome that says it fell not because of decadence, of which there was plenty, but because it was too big and too riddled with Huns, Vandals and other groups that eventually destroyed it. I liked how Napier had the hero, Aetius, and others who sought to save Rome find purpose not in saving an empire they knew was past its prime but in protecting Christianity. Interesting. Less sex this time, b ...more
E. A. Haltom
Jun 09, 2014 E. A. Haltom rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This book stands on its own fairly well, but I read it as the final installation to the trilogy, and I'm glad I did. It was a treat to watch Mr. Napier deftly use different points of view to present the story of a man who ultimately becomes one of history's greatest sociopaths, a significant contributing factor in end of an already decaying Rome. His discussion of battle strategy and the mental costs of war were excellent, as was the character-driven view of the intrigues between the Eastern and ...more
Wellington
Oct 03, 2011 Wellington rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition

When they noticed, people kept asking why I was reading about Attila. It's to balance out all the Glee and Project Runway shows I have to watch. Ah, the things I do for family.

Though the book is titled Attila, it began with Arapovian and Knuckles, two men in the Roman Army and later Aetius, the last of brave and honorable Roman. With Attila committing such atrocities in this book it was difficult to make him the hero.

The book is bloody BLOODY. It's beautiful in its own way and it's written wond
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Jupiter Barrera
Este libro se me hizo demasiado lento, se enfocó mas en el punto de vista de los romanos que en el de Atila, el autor hace rodeos excesivos, incluye muchos detalles para mi gusto innecesarios.
Eric Schumacher
Oct 08, 2014 Eric Schumacher rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Loved this book. Mr. Napier doesn't shy away from war's brutality or history's ironies. I highly recommend this read for anyone interested in Rome, the Huns or ancient history in general.
Tom Webster
Not bad at all.

If like me you subscribe to the view that Rome collapsed through growing too large and too dissolute then you will like the world which Napier creates.
James Gloriod
Jan 01, 2016 James Gloriod rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Well, raising two kids certainly slowed my reading down but I finally finished. I'm a big fan of James Michener's historical novels, and now I'm a fan of William Napier too. I'm looking forward to reading more Napier after reading this great trilogy of Attila.
The maps shown in the books were very helpful for following the storyline, as was the section of place names. A glossary of terms that are no longer in use is not part of the book, but would have been very helpful. I often stopped reading t
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Pipe Sanchez
Mar 16, 2015 Pipe Sanchez rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: pipe
Como todas las trilogías espectaculares, flojea al final. Muy legible
Beatrix
Feb 10, 2015 Beatrix rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Ripping good yarn. Maybe not historically correct in some places but good fictional base for a rapping yarn
Karen
Feb 02, 2011 Karen rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I thought this was an excellent conclusion to the Attila series. The only reason I didn't give it 5 stars was simply that the beginning really drug on and on for me! I felt that it took me a lot longer to get into this one than the other two. I honestly think that I stuck it out simply because I knew it had to get better. I am glad I did though as after the first hundred pages or so the pace did pick up and it became the book I expected it to be.

All in all quite enjoyable and recommended if you
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Scott Gardner
Jul 01, 2015 Scott Gardner rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: historic
Glad I stuck with this series , the final book was the best of the lot , epic battles , heroes , tragic ending
Thomas West
Lib. book
Bruce
Overall I liked the third book in Napier's trilogy on Attila. However the ending felt like the author realized the book was going to be "too big" commercially and shortened the ending in to almost an outline. Still, I learned a lot about the last days of Rome and Attila the Hun, and enjoyed the read while I was learning. Can't ask for much more than that in historical fiction. Well done.
Fan Francis
Jun 05, 2011 Fan Francis rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Historical fiction at its best, my kind of novel and like many that I have read like Conn Iggulden, this rank high up on my list. A pity I can't get my hands on the earlier two; as such I end up reading the last of the series. Will try and get the arlier two, then the story will complete. As it is , this can stand alone by itself, but if I can read the earlier two, then the story is complete.
Angel Serrano
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Christian Riley
Nov 18, 2012 Christian Riley rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Brilliant! The entire Attila trilogy was an excellent read, and this last book blew me away. William Napier's masterful prose, and his ability to "show" the emotions, and characters, and images within the pages of this trilogy truly sets the bar. Best historical fiction I've ever read!
Dalibor Pavlovic
Brilliant trilogy!
Rob
Aug 12, 2009 Rob rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Lovers of Historical-Fiction / Adventure
Once again, I start a trilogy at the end, thus making it a little hard to grasp in certain area`s. Despite this it was well written and pretty historically correct throughout. Good, but not amazing, and im still not decided whether to continue and read the whole series. ...more
Nicole
Nov 04, 2010 Nicole rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Very good! Lots of fighting, blood & gore...which made it very different to the first two. But I was very sad to read of Attila becoming the man that everyone remembers him to be.
Harjoben
Apr 16, 2014 Harjoben rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Never heard of this trilogy before. Not sure why it's not that famous. I really enjoyed it a lot. More than a lot of other books I've read.
Brent
May 29, 2011 Brent rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Even out of order, this Historical Novel Trilogy is captivating. Keeps you turning pages.
Rene Paul Meillon
Mar 24, 2013 Rene Paul Meillon rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Empezó muy bien este último tomo de la serie de tres libros sobre Atila. A ver que sucede
Mia
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
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Librarian Note: There is more than one author in the GoodReads database with this name. See this thread for more information.

A pseudonym of Christopher Hart

Christopher Hart (born 1965) is an English novelist and journalist.

He was educated at Cheltenham College (expelled), Leicester University (dropped out), Oxford Polytechnic and Birkbeck College, London, where he completed a PhD on W.B.Yeats.

Und
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More about William Napier...

Other Books in the Series

Attila Trilogy (3 books)
  • Attila (Attila Trilogy, #1)
  • Attila: The Gathering Of The Storm (Attila Trilogy #2)

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“And one battle looks much like another when you survey the corpses after.” 2 likes
“colectiva. Nuestros aplausos pronto se apagaron.” 0 likes
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