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The Call of Earth (Homecoming Saga #2)

3.56  ·  Rating Details ·  9,627 Ratings  ·  156 Reviews
The Call of Earth (Homecoming
Paperback, 352 pages
Published January 15th 1994 by Tor Science Fiction (first published 1993)
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Kenny The back cover is referring to"The Memory of Earth", book one of the series.

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30)
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Rita Webb
Apr 08, 2009 Rita Webb rated it it was amazing
Shelves: scifi, read-in-2009
Orson Scott Card has managed to do what Robert Jordan could not: he develops a world, characters, history, politics and blends it all together so seamlessly that you forget that it is just a story.

Like Robert Jordan's books, the cast has grown and the world has become more intricate in its politics and deeper in its culture, but unlike Jordan, Card pulls it all together. As a writer, I just shake my head with my mouth hanging open. How did he do it?

In The Call of Earth, the Oversoul realizes tha
...more
Travis Bow
Jul 14, 2015 Travis Bow rated it liked it
Slow start, great finish... another character, idea, and theology study with just enough story in it to be readable and interesting.

There was one great dialogue that I thought was pretty thought provoking regarding belief in God. Which of the following is belief in God?
A) just a choice: based on preference rather than evidence
B) an undeniable fact: the only way to possibly explain the evidence
C) a deniable but probable fact (like a scientific theory): the most likely way to explain the evidence
D
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Celeste Batchelor
Jul 19, 2013 Celeste Batchelor rated it did not like it
I read this book because a person I mentor was reading it and I felt I needed to keep up with them and discuss it. I definitely WILL NOT be reading any more. I am thoroughly disgusted with this author using a story from scripture with such vulgarity.

I discussed with my mentee why I will not be reading any more of this series. It was a good discussion about choosing good classics vs. something others are raving about that may not fit with our personal goals.

NOTE TO PARENTS: This book contains m
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Mel Windham
Jul 14, 2014 Mel Windham rated it really liked it
This second book of the series tells the story of what comes next. Nafai and his brothers must go back to their old city and bring back wives for their upcoming journey. Eventually they must find their way to Earth, where humanity began, and repopulate it.

In many respects, I found this book to be better than its predecessor. Orson Scott Card spends less time relying on the "Book of Mormon" and much more time fleshing out the characters. He even introduces new major characters that have no parall
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Jake
Jun 23, 2010 Jake added it
Shelves: stopped-reading
I really did not like the story. I had to stop reading it. The series is just a fantastical account of the Book Mormon stories. Not my thing, even though Card is an amazing author. He should stick to more "Ender" books.
Alina
Feb 15, 2015 Alina rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Being the second book in the series, I was afraid it will be less interesting. Fortunately, my bias was wrong! The characters are developed even more, both good and evil are present in all of them.
Steven Brandt (Audiobook-Heaven)
Mankind fled the Earth after finally destroying it with their weapons of mass destruction. The few humans left after the holocaust vowed never to let their species develop the ability to destroy itself again. And so, when they colonized the planet Harmony, some 1000 light years from Earth, they built a super-intelligent computer, calling it the Oversoul, to watch over their descendants. For almost 40 million years the Oversoul did what it was programmed to do, guiding humanity and always steerin ...more
Albert Elrod
Feb 10, 2017 Albert Elrod rated it it was ok

Card is an excellent writer, but this is a terrible book. Hamfisted allegory, stilted philosophy, and awkward "romance." The conflict feels beyond pointless, and the motivations at work aren't believable in the least.

I get it. Card is trying to cram Mormon canon into his fictitious world. The problem is that he has no skill at it. His allegory is bald-faced, hackneyed, and juvenile. What good is (attempting) allegory when the two main characters have a literal debate about the nature of God and

...more
Dorian D-W
Jan 18, 2017 Dorian D-W rated it liked it
I'm still very torn about this series. I like Card's writing style: we get a good perspective into the thoughts and motivations of many different characters. And the characters really are different - different in concerns, thought patterns, reflection and much more. But sometimes this is taken a bit too far - a little too much telling rather than showing of emotions feels a bit on the nose. It also reads like Card is trying to imitate C.S. Lewis's religious-allegory style, but replacing the myth ...more
Harold Ogle
Mar 05, 2013 Harold Ogle rated it it was amazing
Shelves: sf, ensemble
Card continues to impress me. This book continues the story started in "The Memory of Earth," detailing the tension between the pressure of high-stakes dramatic events in the lives of many characters and the directions they receive from their god, the caretaker computer system called the Oversoul, which knows best what they should be doing. Do they act out of their own knowledge, or trust the Oversoul to know what's best, even if the actions seem counter-productive, or even foolish?

Broadly spea
...more
Chip Hunter
Dec 31, 2016 Chip Hunter rated it it was amazing
This is an all around excellent book. An incredible cast of characters, a great plot, plenty of crazy twists and turns, and dialect that brings it all to life. While all of the characters from the first book play a big part in this one too, the new character, General Moozh, puts this book on a diferent level. It's going to be hard for the rest of the series to live up to expectations if General Moozh isn't replaced by someone as likeable. However, this books leaves off with the Earthbound party ...more
D. A.
Mar 21, 2014 D. A. rated it really liked it
CALL picks up right where MEMORY left off. MEMORY, I think, was just slightly better than CALL. Not to say that this book isn't good (it is), but throughout the novel, we get the feeling that things are about to happen, and about to happen, and about to happen. Card's pacing is slightly slower. His dialogue . . . well, decide for yourselves about that. But he keeps with the characters. In MEMORY, we're introduced to these great, full characters. In CALL, we go deep inside them and find out what' ...more
Marty Reeder
Aug 12, 2008 Marty Reeder rated it liked it
Shelves: school-bookshelf
Am I getting so picky that when I have such a brilliantly written, fascinating, page-turning read, I only recommend it for my school bookshelf and not higher because it wasn't as good as the one that came before it? Or, if I'm going to put it that way, I even agree with the way the story turned out all the way through, and I wouldn't change anything of it; yet I still demote it from the shelf that its predecessor earned? The simple answer: yes, yes I am getting that picky. But let me get somethi ...more
John Loyd
Apr 08, 2015 John Loyd rated it it was amazing
The Memory of Earth (1992) 330 pages

The Call of Earth (1993) 332 pages

Forty million years ago a colony ship from Earth settled the planet Harmony. An orbiting computer was put in place to keep the people from destroying themselves. The society is sort of pioneer, feudalism, mysticism with some technology (computers, stun guns). We get the idea that this is due to the Oversoul (the orbiting computer) tweaking people away from ideas that would allow them to build things conducive to war. There are
...more
jjonas
A good second part to the series, though simplistic politics and a few characters could have been better.

The beginning felt worse than the previous part of the series, mostly because the rivalling sisters in the beginning were kind of cliche, as was the tired sweet-talking villain. The sisters didn't play that much of a role in this part, perhaps in the next ones. I'm not really looking forward to that.

The biggest problem, and one that was there already in the first part, was simplistic politics
...more
Christophe
Jun 02, 2013 Christophe rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
On le surnomme Mouj. C'est le plus grand général qui ait jamais mené les troupes de l'imperator Goryani au combat. Lorsqu'il apprend que Basilica, la cité des femmes, la ville éternelle, est agitée par les soubresauts de la guerre civile, son génie militaire lui fait immédiatement entrevoir le parti qu'il peut tirer de la situation. Mais le stratège ne sait pas encore qu'il s'apprête à livrer son plus difficile combat : Basilica cristallise l'attention de Surâme, l'ordinateur-dieu qui n'a pas l
...more
Spencer Davis
Sep 29, 2011 Spencer Davis rated it really liked it
Disclaimer: This review will spoil the FIRST book in the series.

Orson Scott Card succeeds again. Author of Ender's Game , his success with science fiction is astounding. Volemak and his sons are still affecting Basillica from without. As the story begins to pick up, we are introduced to a new character, Moozh, a general for the Goryani, and they are on the march.

With Gaballufix dead, Rash has taken over Basillica, and the city has destabilized. During this crisis, Volemak and his sons must find
...more
Villager
Mar 15, 2011 Villager rated it really liked it
I made a decision to read the 'Homecoming' series by Orson Card. This is Book #2 in that series and it succeeded in getting me hooked into the overall series. It provides a unique view of the future of humans. It appears that Earth is ravaged by nuclear war and what-not ... humans have to leave earth in order to find other places to live. Some of the people arrive on a world in another galaxy that is called 'Harmony'. They live in peace for 40 million years ... with one catch ... the computer th ...more
Geoff
Dec 15, 2010 Geoff added it
In the second installment of Orson Scott Card’s five book series Homecoming we pick up right where The Memory of Earth left off. This time however we are not solely focused on the Wetchik clan, instead we learn about a new character Moohz, a great Gorayni general. Although the Gorayni worship differently, they still worship the Oversoul, but call it God. As we delve more into his story we learn his people were conquered and annihilated by the Gorayni and he is biding his time until he is able to ...more
Jason
Jul 26, 2015 Jason rated it did not like it
Shelves: 2015
I am a huge Orson Scott Card fan but this book was absolutely terrible. I hate to say it but it was borderline unreadable for me. I felt like it was written by an uninformed and sheltered teenager. I did enjoy the first book of this series (albeit many years ago) and was excited to read the next installment. Unfortunately this narrative is rather slow and to be honest, quite shallow.

The characters are all one dimensional and their actions are laughable. Card's message about religion and faith co
...more
E. Kimble
Jan 25, 2013 E. Kimble rated it it was amazing


I honestly couldn't tell you if this is any kind of an objectively five-star A+++ excellent novel or not, because I was so blinded by how much I liked Moozh that my vision of the whole book is skewed. Moozh! What a completely fantastic character. Card mentions in the preface that he made the book much more difficult to write by complicating the plot, but also made it more worthwhile in the end. This is not hard to believe.

The Homecoming saga is a weird series for me, as I'm not familiar with th
...more
Leslie Godwin
May 31, 2016 Leslie Godwin rated it liked it
I both loved and loathed this book.

What I liked: The characters (except Elemak, what a punk). The plot. The storytelling. The way everything fits together like pieces of a puzzle.

What I disliked: Even though I like aspects of OSCs world-building in this series, it's become very paradoxical and borderline distasteful. Basilica is governed as a sort of matriarchy where only women are allowed to live (own property) in the city. Despite this setup, the men seem to have a lot of pull politically and
...more
Scott
Jun 26, 2016 Scott rated it it was ok
WHAT THE HELL was OSC thinking? This is the biggest piece of crap I've read in years. I've LOVED 16 Ender books. I've Loved the 3 Gate Thief books. Those all had Great writing, great characters, great adventure.
THIS load of crap is like he lost a bet, and had to write a bad book in a week, with despicable characters, no action, no hero, no anything. Page after page after page after page of 1 dimensional stick figures, whining and whining and whining. About nothing. This book is like Oakland --
...more
Ken
Sep 12, 2016 Ken rated it liked it
Not his greatest work. Too influenced by his religion
Rod Hyatt
Jul 11, 2012 Rod Hyatt rated it really liked it


This book started out as a continuation of the first book with father and sons now in the desert with their continuing affairs and going back to Basilica. I thought that this book would be so so continuing the story, you somewhat know we're it's going. The meat of this book is in the back story's that are revealed and dropped with fantastic story telling and surprise, you could have never predicted but after you realize how much sense it really made. No vague story here, no holes in the plot at
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Laura
Apr 21, 2016 Laura rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
La llamada de la tierra m'ha agradat tant com la primera part. El llibre comença just on ho va deixar l'anterior (moments després del final, a la mateixa nit), i veiem com van evolucionant els personatges.

La idea principal d'aquest llibre són els preparatius que fa tota la família per anar-se'n cap a la terra. M'intriga com aconseguiran viatjar a la Terra, en una societat on es desplacen en camell o cavall... però tot arribarà.

Per descomptat, els personatges d'en Nafai, la Luet i Hushidh cada c
...more
Emily
Feb 24, 2011 Emily rated it really liked it
Nafai and his family have been prepared by the Oversoul to make the long journey back to earth, but first they need to clear up a few things in Basilica. They need to gather their wives and supplies. With General Moozh angling for a bloodless capture of the city and Nafai's family entrenched in his plans, they must obey the Oversoul and divert Moozh's schemes.
This "bridge" book could have been rather boring, but Card's skill in bringing tension to every machination is its saving grace. The suspe
...more
Anna
Jun 06, 2008 Anna rated it liked it
I think I'll stick my rant about Arthur C Clark on this book, just for good measure. I should probably recommend it as an important read, maybe give it a bit more star... I think any book that stays with you over the years was worth reading, and this series, certain scenes and ideas from it anyway, has stayed in my head since high school. But it's not a favorite. I just personally can't get over the dreamy idealism... my remembered impression of the story is lack of spunk:p I might have to rerea ...more
Colleen
Aug 03, 2011 Colleen rated it liked it
Shelves: read-unowned
"...Overall, I like The Call of Earth much better than its predecessor, not only because the pacing of events is more to my liking, but because of the characters as well. There is much more of Luet in this book, as I was hoping. She was easily my favorite character, and she still is, though there is a lot of her older sister, the raveler Hushidh, in this one as well, and she's equally interesting to me...As for the ending, I liked how things wrap up. Card leaves off with enough tension to make m ...more
Misha
Sep 15, 2013 Misha rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
I've been listening to these books on Audio and I can't remember if it was this book or the next, but I had to keep the ear phones in and not play it aloud. I would not have wanted my children and would have even been embarrassed if my husband had heard had heard me listening to certain moments in this book! It was very sexual in nature. I'm not sure if it was to show how low some of these people were (there was an instance of a woman cheating on her husband with her sister's husband--was descri ...more
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Orson Scott Card is the author of the novels Ender's Game, Ender's Shadow, and Speaker for the Dead, which are widely read by adults and younger readers, and are increasingly used in schools.
Besides these and other science fiction novels, Card writes contemporary fantasy (Magic Street, Enchantment, Lost Boys), biblical novels (Stone Tables, Rachel and Leah), the American frontier fantasy series Th
...more
More about Orson Scott Card...

Other Books in the Series

Homecoming Saga (5 books)
  • The Memory of Earth (Homecoming, #1)
  • The Ships of Earth (Homecoming, #3)
  • Earthfall (Homecoming, #4)
  • Earthborn (Homecoming, #5)

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“If I wanted to doubt, then I could doubt endlessly ... but at some point a person has to stop questioning and act, and at that point you have to trust something to be true. You have to act as if something is true, and so you choose the thing you have the most reason to believe in, you have to live in the world that you have the most hope in. I follow [God], I believe [God], because I want to live in the world that [God] has shown me.” 7 likes
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