Ronda de noche (MundoDisco, #29)
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Ronda de noche (Discworld #29)

4.44 of 5 stars 4.44  ·  rating details  ·  53,668 ratings  ·  988 reviews
Commander Sam Vimes of the Ankh-Morpork City Watch had it all. But now he's back in his own rough, tough past without even the clothes he was standing up in when the lightning struck.

Living in the past is hard. Dying in the past is incredibly easy. But he must survive, because he has a job to do. He must track down a murderer, teach his younger self how to be a good copper...more
Published (first published November 4th 2002)
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Leah
My favourite Pratchett novel, but I'm not really sure why.

I think that Sam Vimes' being in it definitely helps: I think my favourite "series" in the Discworld novels are the City Watch series (along with the witches of Lancre and Death). His character arc really comes to a head in this one, even though he still has another level to go to in Thud!

I also think that time travel being in it also definitely helps. Though not the quantum, metaphysical, zany fun of Thief of Time (though Lu Tze makes an...more
Speedtribes
While Terry Pratchett is known for the humor in his Discworld series, I enjoy them primarily because-- while on the surface, his books do indeed classify as humor, he also writes these almost painful realities, very human thoughts and incredibly immersive emotions in situations that you generally don't find in most humorous fantasy/sci-fi which tends more towards parody and caricatures. Though, I wouldn’t exactly say that the Discworld series isn't a parody-- because his books are parodies, or s...more
Megan Baxter
Somehow Terry Pratchett seems to go down particularly well when I'm not feeling at my best. I've read several that I've enjoyed but not been particularly grabbed by. In comparison, the times that I've read one of his books while sick or exhausted, I have liked them a whole lot more.

Note: The rest of this review has been withdrawn due to the changes in Goodreads policy and enforcement. You can read why I came to this decision here.

In the meantime, you can read the entire review at Smorgasbook
Merand
I may have said this when I finished the last Discworld book but this was by far the best Discworld book yet. Perhaps the best Pratchett book I've read. I loved it. It was not laugh out loud funny the way many of Pratchett's books are but it was so good. It was darker, delving into the history of Ankh-Morpork (Discworld's largest city) and allowing us glimpses into the past of several repeat characters, primarily Sam Vimes, Commander of the Night Watch, but also Lord Vetinari, Patrician of Ankh-...more
Lightreads
Another Watch novel, in which Sam Vimes Is accidentally transported decades into the past in pursuit of a murderous psychopath, whereupon he must play the part of the old Sergeant who first taught young Lance Corporal Sam Vimes what it means to be a copper. Meanwhile, political unrest spreads across the city, the old Patrician is on his way out, and the barricades are going up. Vimes knows what’s going to happen – he was there after all – and he’s visited the graves every year since. And now he’...more
Morganlise
If I could give this book ten stars, I would. In fact, it makes me rethink all of the other books that I've given five stars, perhaps they don't deserve it...

Here's the problem: This book isn't going to have the right impact unless you've read, at the very least, three of the previous Ankh-Morpork Night Watch books. Please, if you have heard about Pratchett and are looking for some place to start, go with "Guards Guards!" or "Mort", and read a few more before you embark on this one. You'll thank...more
Algernon
One of the best books in the Discworld series. The story revolves around Sam Vimes, and it's a very good example of the author's shift from slapstick comedy to a subtler form of humor and to targetting in his imaginary world real problems from the world we live in.
Using the plot device of time travel, the author throws the Commander of the Ankh-Morpork City Watch back to a revolutionary episode of the city history and to his own apprenticeship in the Watch. The theme offers the author rich picki...more
Levka
I admit, I like Terry Pratchett a lot anyway, but "Night Watch" is hands down my favorite Discworld novels (Jingo comes in a distant second). One of the darkest and most complex of the City Watch stories, while pursuing a truly depraved criminal named Carcer, Commander Sir Samuel Vimes is thrown back through time on the eve of the birth of his son to help... well, himself. Ankh-Morpork is on the brink of revolution, and somebody's got to make sure young Sammy doesn't die before his time.

But it's...more
Olga Godim
Unlike most other Discworld novels, this is not a funny book. It’s exploratory and philosophical and delves deep into the natures of leadership and decency, courage and tolerance.
By accident, Sam Vimes, the Watch Commander of Ankh-Morpork and a Duke, is transported 30 years into the past, when the young Sam Vimes was just starting his work in the city police. The streets are boiling with unrest on the eve of a bloody rebellion, and it’s up to the older and much more experienced Vimes to preserv...more
Roger
Mar 08, 2008 Roger rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition Recommends it for: Anyone over 12
Pratchet is brilliant. The story is part of the 'Guards' sequence in the Disc World series. For non-Disc Worlders you have to understand that prolific Pratchet created a comic fantasy world called the Disc World and then proceeded to write stories set in different parts of it, with different characters etc that sometimes meet each other.

The Guards sequence centres on Sam Vimes who is a cop in the city of Ank-Morepork. It is kind of medieval, kind of modern. In this story Sam has risen to be comm...more
Chris
Vimes is one of Pratchett's characters that has grown greatly over the course of the Discworld series. This book affirms Vimes' place as the traditional family man, a far cry from where Vimes was when the reader is first introduced to him in Guards! Guards!.

The story itself highlights the growth of Anakh-Morpork as well as gives the reader valuable insight into the city's recurring, though not central, characters, such as Reg Shoe, Nobby, and Colon. Pratchett seems to really like Vimes, and in f...more
An Odd1
"Night Watch" by Terry Pratchett. Duke Sam Vimes is Ankh-Morpork City Watch Commander, one privileged to don a purple sweet-scented lilac sprig for 25 May memorial of the Revolution. Many, including fellow officers, lost their lives, and corrupt dictator Patrician Winder was assassinated. Our hero is no longer the naive inexperienced novice recruit of weeks, mentored by senior John Keel of the night shift. Nor is pregnant wife Sybil young, her firstborn is due within hours.
Perhaps continuity wi...more
Silvana
I was right. It is my favorite Discworld novel so far. It is dark, gritty, hilarious, fun to read. And somehow, very real. It made me feel I was running chasing bad guys and tiptoeing along side Vimes. I would love a day hanging out with him, my fave character so far. And I think Vetinari was pretty awesome as well. Argh, can't wait to read the other Watch novels!
Chris
Pratchett books are like potato chips - can't read just one.

The Discworld books are broadly arranged into four groups. The Death books look at what it means to be a human being, the Wizard books are about how we deal with the universe at large, the Witches books are about how the individual fits into the rest of society, and the Watch books are about how we deal with being part of a system. Having been a poli-sci major, I tend to enjoy the latter group the most.

The main character of the Watch bo...more
Vlad
Unlike most Discworld novels, Night Watch has a far more serious tone. This often occurs at the expense of humor, and frequently goes as far as being sad or tragic. It was a risky experiment on Pratchett's part, and while it largely succeeds, it's not quite up to the level of his best work.

We follow Sam Vimes, the leader of the City Watch (Ankh-Morpork's police force), and now a Duke who is second in power only to Lord Vetinari himself. However, while chasing after dangerous criminal Carcer, an...more
Frances
Read this five or six times, now, and hadn't realized I hadn't put it in Goodreads until now.

It's the seventh Watch book in the Discworld; I think it probably requires a little bit of background. This is a shame, since it's a book I love enough I would like to be able to recommend that people read it with as little wait as possible.

It's about fear, and the problems inherent in trying to manage people, and secret police, and what you are and are not willing to give up for the right thing. History...more
L.J. Smith
Where do I begin with this most beloved of books, by this most beloved of current authors? I guess I can start by explaining how I came to read the world-renowned works of Sir Terry “the new Chaucer”* Pratchett myself. It was because of a blog that I came across accidentally. The blogger was thrilled because a new Disc World book had come out in the USA, and she couldn’t wait to read about “Death’s granddaughter.” She added that she envied anyone who hadn’t read a single book in the fantasy seri...more
Shanshad Whelan
I think this is Pratchett at his best right here. It certainly is some of the best Vimes character work. A few of Pratchett's books have certain scenes that make me tear up. This one has quite a few--and many, many places where I simply want to quote whole paragraphs. Marvelous, profound and so undeniably human. Thank you, Mr. Pratchett, for this book.
pinar
without a doubt my all-time favorite of the whole series. somewhat darker compared to most other books and great insight by pterry on the nature of people in general, revolutions in particular and everything in between. can't remember how many times I might have quoted (from memory) from Night Watch. I think I actually re-read it once a year.
Peregrine
I think this is one of the best Discworld books I've read so far. It was excellent. I mean, it had the Assassin's Guild, the Time Monks, AND the Watch. What's not to like?
Сергей Бережной
"...Не то, чтобы город погряз в беззаконии - как раз законов у него было в избытке. Просто он создавал для граждан не так уж много возможностей существовать без их нарушения. Свингу и в голову не могло придти, что цель его службы - ловить преступников и, не мытьём так катаньем, делать из них порядочных людей. Вместо этого он предпочитал ловить честных людей и делать из них преступников..."


Читаешь такое и думаешь - ах, старый чёрт, эко он насмотрелся на наших российских правоохранителей! Ведь оди...more
Marilag
I thought The Truth would remain to be my personal favorite of the Discworld series. Then Night Watch came along. I really arfing loved this one, from beginning to end. It wasn't even just about the little gems that Pratchett usually comes up with (though Death talking about cake in CAPITAL LETTERS LIKE THIS only further made me laugh and love this book even more). It was the story and the characters and well, the wibbly wobbly timey quantum-y. Yes.

I must admit that I knew to pick the book up be...more
X5-494
Eigentlich hasse ich Zeitreise-Geschichten. Zumindest, wenn wir nicht gerade bei „Doctor Who“ (und selbst DANN gibt es noch das eine oder andere, das mich echt aufpeitscht) oder „Zurück in die Zukunft“ sind.

Ich lese einfach nicht gerne Stories, in denen die Hauptcharaktere in ihre eigene Vergangenheit reisen und genau wissen – enweder von Anfang an oder weil sie es von irgendjemandem gefühlte zehn Trillionen mal gesagt kriegen – dass sie bestimmte Dinge nicht verändern dürfen (um die Zukunft, a...more
Zak King
READ THIS IF...: You like Terry Pratchett & similar authors, irony, humor

DON'T READ THIS IF...: You have not read at least a few other Terry Pratchett books, one or two of which are Sam Vimes books, cannot handle time travel or reasonably complex plots

This book is not only hilarious, but it is much deeper than just a parody. We join Commander Vimes just before the birth of his first child, chasing a murderer across the rooftops. After some quirky magical event (involving those pesky UU wizar...more
Eliza
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Donna
While it had its moments, I have to say I struggled to get through this one. I just didn’t find it all that interesting. I did, however, pull some excellent lines from the text–

“Old Tom, the University’s venerable clock, tolled not sounds but silences. Not simple ordinary silences, but intervals of noise-absorbing nonsound, which filled the world with loud soundlessness.”–Footnote

“The Watchmen turned and stared. A large blob of foam, which up until that point had been performing sterling servi...more
Lynnette
Oh, my. Oh, oh, oh my. I do love this book. Of all the Discworld books, I have read it the most often, and find something new to think about every time. I have a lot of trouble writing about my most-loved titles without sounding like a sniveling, sentimental sycophant, but I will try.

This particular book deals with heinous crime, time travel, the creation of a family, political intrigue and alternate histories, (or futures, depending on your POV). All of my favorite characters from Ankh-Morpork...more
mina
Tips: Baca dulu minimal 2 buku Discworld dari subserial City Watch (lebih baik lagi kalau sudah pernah membaca subserial lainnya).

Buku ini adalah salah satu dari subserial City Watch dalam dunia Discworld, dengan the usual lovable characters: Vimes (or should we say John Keel?), Colon, Nobby, Reg, Cut-Me-Own-Throat Dibbler, Vetinari, the "seamstresses" (and the real seamstress). Oh, dan ada Archchancellor Ridcully dari Unseen University (melayang bersama bak mandinya) dan sekilas muncul the ador...more
Kathleen
Great book! Great series! Not a romance series, but there are some love interests.

Night Watch isn't as witty the previous two books. Not so much word play. Not as much political satire. This book is a more poignant novel, where Vimes is a young man, new to the City Watch, learning the ropes. It's a book about believing passionately in a cause and getting the job done!

See my review of the series embedded in my review of Guards! Guards!

http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

Series: Here are the...more
Rachel
Let me preface this by saying this is currently my favorite book, yet if I'd read this without the other 28 before, I can't imagine I'd have enjoyed it in the least. How does that happen?? Let me tell you. This ranks up there with Going Postal as my current favorites of Terry Pratchett so far. Now that I've given in to pressure and read through most, I finally have gotten a feel for the Discworld. And it's paid me back with much enjoyment. However, unlike Going Postal, Night Watch does not stand...more
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Quantum 5 99 Dec 16, 2012 10:47PM  
SciFi and Fantasy...: BBC Radio serial of Night Watch 9 37 Dec 05, 2011 11:26AM  
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1654
Sir Terry Pratchett sold his first story when he was thirteen, which earned him enough money to buy a second-hand typewriter. His first novel, a humorous fantasy entitled The Carpet People, appeared in 1971 from the publisher Colin Smythe. Terry worked for many years as a journalist and press officer, writing in his spare time and publishing a number of novels, including his first Discworld novel,...more
More about Terry Pratchett...
Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch The Color of Magic (Discworld, #1) Guards! Guards! (Discworld, #8) Mort (Discworld, #4) Small Gods (Discworld, #13)

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“No! Please! I'll tell you whatever you want to know!" the man yelled.
"Really?" said Vimes. "What's the orbital velocity of the moon?"
"What?"
"Oh, you'd like something simpler?”
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“We who think we are about to die will laugh at anything.” 532 likes
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