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The Ivory Child (Allan Quatermain #8)

3.86 of 5 stars 3.86  ·  rating details  ·  155 ratings  ·  11 reviews
Sir Henry Rider Haggard KBE (1856-1925) was a Victorian writer of adventure novels set in exotic locations. After failing his army entrance exam he was sent to a private 'crammer' in London to prepare for the entrance exam for the British Foreign Office, for which he never sat. Haggard's father sent him to Africa in an unpaid position as assistant to the secretary to Lieut ...more
Paperback, 284 pages
Published January 18th 2008 by Dodo Press (first published 1916)
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Shuhan Rizwan
সেই অযালান, সেই আফরিকা, সেই কোনো দুরগম অঞচলের উপজাতি। হযাগারডের চিরচেনা ছকে লেখা এই কাহিনি কেবল মনে রাখা যায় হযানসের জনযে। সেই বুড়ো ডাচভাষী হটেনটট, জুলু মাভোভো যার নাম দিয়েছিলো অনধকারের আলো, অগণিতবার বুদধির জোরে অসমভবকে যে সমভব করে তুলেছে কোয়ারটারমেইনের জনযে- জানি কলপিত এক চরিতর সে, তবু- তার পরয়াণে কোথাও খারাপ লাগলো বড়। ...more
As a kid, I was obsessed with RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK. As far as the action/adventure genre is concerned, it's in a league all its own.
THE IVORY CHILD isn't a movie, but it's got that RAIDERS spark. I've always heard that Allan Quatermain was an influence on George Lucas when he created Indiana Jones, and it wouldn't surprise me if this book in particular had the biggest impact. Heck, it even features a character who's scared to death of snakes.
The more books I read by H. Rider Haggard the more convinced I am that he is a vastly under-rated author. This book, for me, even surpasses his more famous ones, King Solomon's Mines and She. It starts out rather slowly, in England, where the great hunter Allan Quatermain is making one of his rare trips outside Africa. I say slowly, meaning action-wise, but not at all boringly. The pheasant-hunting contest was riveting. The story moves back to Africa and Quatermain recounts the failed gold mine ...more
Shafaet Ashraf
দুরদানত অযাডভেঞচার, অযালান কোয়াটারমেইনের সেরাগুলোর একটা! অনুবাদ আরো ভালো হতে পারতো, সেবার অনয অনুবাদগুলোর মত মান ধরে রাখতে পারে নি, তবে তারপরেও অনয যেকোনো পরকাশনীর থেকে ভালো। ...more
This is another of the 14 Allan Quatermain tales from the pen of that great adventure fantasist, H. Rider Haggard. This novel is a direct continuation of "Allan and the Holy Flower," and it does help to have read the previous book. Also referenced are other Quatermain novels such as "Marie," "Child of Storm" and "Allan's Wife," and while a knowledge of these earlier books will make for a richer experience, "Ivory Child" can certainly be read on its own. In this one, Quatermain goes on a quest to ...more
Alastair Hudson
I've been steadily working through the Quatermain books in their written order and this is by far the most mystical one yet. The tie-in with the previous 'flower' book should not preclude jumping straight into this one if you're keen
Quatermain plays the role of the perplexed protagonist in an even more retiring frame than usual. In many ways he's the hapless observer in this adventure, rarely taking a lead role. His dry summaries of extraordinary events work well as part of his 'reserved english
I really liked it, mostly because I've read King Solomon's Mines many times in my youth, but now I'm working my way through the many adventures of Allan. This was a rich experience for me. Many readers downgrade the Haggard's books based on the racial attitude of the time that he wrote. I read his books as more of a travelogue. I love the descriptions of the time and the terrain. I miss Africa and this brings a little piece of home to me.
Allan Quartermain is a strong and talented hunter, though small in size and in his self-concept. I enjoy the author's simple, forthright style of writing, and the way Quartermain tells his own stories as in a diary; preparing us for what lies ahead with little side comments. He runs into amazing adventures all along the way, and is very talented in reading human nature.

I was first drawn in to the Allan Quartemain series because of the definite Christian values he builds his life on, but now, as
why do I read this trash?
No, the question is different: why do I study this trash? There's no valuable or interesting idea; there's no character development; there isn't even any suspense in plot, because the author makes his narrator tell all the important spoilers in advance. If anything justifies this waste of time, I had a great comparatist's insight: Haggard was definitely an important prerequisite for how the mass culture later depicts the mystics of ancient cults of semi-wild tribe out of
This book was better than She, but worst than King Solomon's Mines. I was lacking something while reading it.
I'm still not a fan of the african adventure story but this is certainly better than most. A lot of different aspects to it, its got some humor, its fairly dark in places, some romance, lot of magic as well as the usual war scenes. It's good for its type.
Danny marked it as to-read
Oct 12, 2015
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MB Taylor marked it as to-read
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Miki Dimitrova marked it as to-read
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Gpd is currently reading it
Sep 07, 2015
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Sir Henry Rider Haggard was an English writer of adventure novels set in exotic locations, predominantly Africa, and the creator of the Lost World literary genre. His stories, situated at the lighter end of the scale of Victorian literature, continue to be popular and influential. He was also involved in agricultural reform and improvement in the British Empire.

His breakout novel was King Solomon
More about H. Rider Haggard...

Other Books in the Series

Allan Quatermain (1 - 10 of 15 books)
  • King Solomon's Mines (Allan Quatermain, #1)
  • Allan Quatermain
  • Maiwa's Revenge: Or The War Of The Little Hand
  • Allan's Wife and Others
  • Marie: An Episode in the Life of the Late Allan Quatermain
  • Child of Storm
  • Allan and the Holy Flower
  • Finished
  • The Ancient Allan
  • She and Allan
King Solomon's Mines (Allan Quatermain, #1) She (She, #1) Allan Quatermain The People of the Mist Ayesha: The Return of She

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