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The Complete Stories of Theodore Sturgeon, Volume XIII: Case and the Dreamer (The Complete Stories of Theodore Sturgeon #13)

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4.51  ·  Rating Details ·  37 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
James Blish called him the "finest conscious artist science fiction ever produced." Kurt Vonnegut based the famous character Kilgore Trout on him. And such luminaries as Harlan Ellison, Stephen King, and Octavia Butler have hailed him as a mentor. Theodore Sturgeon was both a popular favorite and a writer's writer, carving out a singular place in the literary landscape ...more
Hardcover, 400 pages
Published September 28th 2010 by North Atlantic Books
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Kalin
Feb 13, 2016 Kalin rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A powerful, diverse collection which squashed my fears that Sturgeon's juices might have run dry toward the end of his literary path.

Now, where can this metaphor have come from ....

~ One thing I love about Sturgeon is how gently he could chide--if he would chide at all. Here's his chastening of pulpy, actiony SF (can I actually say 'sci-fi' here? :P).

It's from "Time Warp," which is as fine a piece of actiony SF (definitely not sci-fi) as they come.

~ "The Country of Afterward," besides Sturgeon's
...more
Williwaw
Jul 31, 2011 Williwaw rated it it was amazing
I spent a bundle collecting first editions of this 13-volume set of Sturgeon's short stories. I have not been reading them systematically from start to finish. Instead, I'm somewhat randomly poking through the set. Perhaps some day, I'll try to read every story.

So far, I'm amazed at Sturgeon's story-telling talent. Among his best known and most admired stories are: "The Man Who Lost the Sea," "And Now for the News," "Microcosmic God," "Killdozer," and "The Graveyard Reader."

Sturgeon is widely
...more
Michael Battaglia
Jun 26, 2016 Michael Battaglia rated it it was amazing
And so we come to the end. Thirteen volumes in about sixteen years containing every single known short story Theodore Sturgeon ever published. For people who were following this series from the beginning and reading each volume each year as it came out it must have felt like growing up again with Sturgeon's writing, from his first embryonic efforts to the hit after brilliant hit he could churn out seemingly effortlessly until he finally started to write like a mere mortal and gave us stories ...more
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Theodore Sturgeon (1918–1985) is considered one of the godfathers of contemporary science fiction and dark fantasy. The author of numerous acclaimed short stories and novels, among them the classics More Than Human, Venus Plus X, and To Marry Medusa, Sturgeon also wrote for television and holds among his credits two episodes of the original 1960s Star Trek series, for which he created the Vulcan ...more
More about Theodore Sturgeon...

Other Books in the Series

The Complete Stories of Theodore Sturgeon (1 - 10 of 13 books)
  • The Complete Stories of Theodore Sturgeon, Volume 1: The Ultimate Egoist
  • The Complete Stories of Theodore Sturgeon, Volume II: Microcosmic God
  • The Complete Stories of Theodore Sturgeon, Volume III: Killdozer!
  • The Complete Stories of Theodore Sturgeon, Volume 4: Thunder and Roses
  • The Complete Stories of Theodore Sturgeon, Volume 5: The Perfect Host
  • The Complete Stories of Theodore Sturgeon, Volume VI: Baby Is Three
  • The Complete Stories of Theodore Sturgeon, Volume 7: A Saucer of Loneliness
  • The Complete Stories of Theodore Sturgeon, Volume VIII: Bright Segment
  • The Complete Stories of Theodore Sturgeon, Volume IX: And Now the News...
  • The Complete Stories of Theodore Sturgeon, Voume X: The Man Who Lost the Sea

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“But why write such rotten scripts? If what you say is so, everybody’s where they want to be, even beggars with sores on their shins and starving children and guys being tortured in jails?” She nodded, watching me. I said, “I can’t accept that.”
She waited a bit and then almost smiled. “Unacceptable?” She asked softly.
And that rang a bell. “Unacceptable … ‘to accept the unacceptable.’ You said that, in the seminar. But I can’t remember why you said it.”
“Yes you can,” she said, and waited. I drew a total blank this time, and I guess she knew it, because she gave me a nudge: “You say you don’t belong here. Is ‘here’—unacceptable?”
“Yes,” I said without hesitation. “Then,” she asked, “why did you write this script?” “You mean—the me out there?” She nodded. I thought about that, and then mumbled, “I put it down to—curiosity? That’s all. I mean, throwing yourself into imperfect places, into pain and disappointment and well, the unacceptable—it just doesn’t make sense.”
“It doesn’t?”
“It sure doesn’t … unless …” I felt my eyes get big. “Unless those, uh, entities want to do what you said—to learn to accept the unacceptable. Even if they have to create it. That doesn’t make sense.”
“It doesn’t? Suppose they can’t go on unless they learn that.”
“Go on? Go on where?” She shrugs. “Everything living has to go on. Seed to shrub, shrub to tree, egg to bird.”
“You mean—evolve. They have to learn to accept the unacceptable in order to evolve into—whatever’s next for them.” Surprisingly, she laughed. She said, “You keep on saying ‘they.”
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“You said to imagine a great big sphere, and inside is all of time and space. All of it. And outside are these intelligent entities, and all they are is curious; all they want to do is experience.”
“Go on,” Alice said. Her eyes are so bright.…
“One might say: ‘I want the experience of being a seventeen-year-old girl in the fourteenth century who was burned at the stake.’ Or ‘I’d like the experience of being a four-month aborted fetus in 1994.’ And they just dive in and do it.” I looked at Alice. She was waiting for something. I thought about what I just said, and then I remembered: “They have to create what happens. Write a script.” She still waited, so I said, “Not only the experience itself; the house, the city, the country, the whole world where it happens. All of it.”
“Which makes that entity responsible for all of it,” she reminded me.
“So that’s who the ‘little man watching’ really is—that, that thing—”
“Not a thing,” she said, interrupting for the very first time. “It’s you. You’re living a script that you wrote. Which is why free will and predestination are the same thing.”
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