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The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories

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4.12 of 5 stars 4.12  ·  rating details  ·  1,058 ratings  ·  130 reviews
What’s better than a lost treasure? Seven lost treasures! These rarely seen Dr. Seuss stories were published in magazines in the early 1950s and are finally available in book form. They include “The Bippolo Seed” (in which a scheming feline leads a duck toward a bad decision), “The Rabbit, the Bear, and the Zinniga-Zanniga” (about a rabbit who is saved from a bear by a sin...more
Hardcover, 72 pages
Published September 27th 2011 by Random House Books for Young Readers (first published September 28th 2010)
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(showing 1-30 of 2,261)
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Sarah BT
I think this book is best enjoyed on audio with wonderful narrators!! I'm always a bit nervous about "lost" stories, but I enjoyed this collection for the most part, especially after hearing about how they were short works originally published in magazines and newspapers. I thought I'd share a breakdown of what I liked or disliked about each story:


The Bippolo Seed narrated by Neil Patrick Harris-I loved this story and I really thought it was the strongest of the book. It had the classic Seuss f...more
Sarah Mayor Cox
I was really excited when I heard about a new Dr. Suess book because like many I grew up reading ‘One Fish Blue Fish, The Cat in the Hat’ etc. The Sneetches is my favourite story of all, and I often think of it still as it captures so many issues of exclusion and consumerism pertinent today.

I was also really worried that I would be disappointed. When Hooray for Diffendoofer Day was published in 1998 it was a collective creation by Jack Prelutsky & Lane Smith – based on verses & sketches...more
Book Concierge
This is a collection of little-known stories by Theodor Geisel a/k/a Dr. Seuss. As explained by Charles D Cohen in the introduction to this book, the “buried treasure” of these lost stories had been hidden for decades. They were all published between 1948 through 1959 as short works in a variety of magazines. Cohen, a Seuss scholar, tracked them down and arranged to have them published in this collection.

The stories are from a time period when Seuss was experimenting with what would become his...more
Meredith
I am a huge Seuss fan. I frequently re-read my collection just to myself. My knee-jerk to this was "awesome!" But I was less than enthralled. Half of this material was used in later, "published" stories (and be "published" I mean in books, which is how Random House defined it, since these were all technically "published" in magazines before, and were remembered and treasured by the public, as evidenced by the foreword) ... so some of these produced weird deja vu - the splotch that won't rub off,...more
Belinda
I have been so excited to read this book to my girls since it was first disclosed that these stories were being published and was so chuffed when I was able to find a copy to give them for Christmas. My girls (8 and 5) are enthralled with Dr Seuss. They were actually looking forward to going to bed so we could read the next story.

I think what gets them in is the funny and quirky rhyming. It's just so easy to read but just sucks you into the story so easily.

And what I love most is the moral at t...more
Ardea Smith
Title / Author / Publication Date: The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories/Dr. Seuss/2010

Genre: Fiction

Format: Hardcover

Plot summary: Presents seven Dr. Seuss stories first published in magazines between 1948 and 1959, with an introduction and commentary on each.

Considerations or precautions for readers advisory: None

Review citation: Dickerson, C. (2012). The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories by Dr. Seuss (Book Review). School Library Journal, 58(1), 59.

Section source used to find the materia...more
Cruth
Author/Illustrator: Dr Seuss
First Published (individually): 1950-1951
First Published (as a collection): 1996

Stories:
The Bippolo Seed
The Rabbit, the Bear, and the Zinniga-Zanniga
Gustav, the Goldfish
Tadd and Todd
Steak for Supper
The Strange Shirt Spot
The Great Henry McBride

An interesting collection of Seuss stories which tease the reader with what was to come. From the obvious "Cat in the Hat Comes Back" spot in "The Strange Shirt Spot" to the crazy animals in "Steak for Supper" and treatise on gre...more
Angie
Synopsis: "What’s better than a lost treasure? Seven lost treasures! These rarely seen Dr. Seuss stories were published in magazines in the early 1950s and are finally available in book form. They include “The Bippolo Seed” (in which a scheming feline leads a duck toward a bad decision), “The Rabbit, the Bear, and the Zinniga-Zanniga” (about a rabbit who is saved from a bear by a single eyelash), “Gustav, the Goldfish” (an early rhymed version of the Beginner Book A Fish Out of Water), “Tadd and...more
Cheryl in CC NV
Treasure chest indeed - nothing groundbreaking - but still a worthy addition to every collection. Everyone needs more Seuss in their lives! And with seven tales, from adventure to fables, you'll have a new favorite here. Mine is probably the last, with its reminder that we should dare to dream big.

Now if only someone would collect all the Flit ads and other 'works' by Geisel, I'd be thrilled. Or has someone? Do you know?
Erin Cataldi
It was soo soo worth it to listen to the audiobook version of this book!! Each story was narrated by a different celebrity: Peter Dinklage, Neal Patrick Harris, Angelica Houston, Jason Lee, Joan Cusack and more are on this star studded audiobook. Each narrator brought their own distinct and fun take on the Dr. Seuss stories. Seven lost stories are included as well as a ten minute commentary by Dr. Seuss scholar on the history and nature of these stories. The stories are classic Dr. Steuss, new c...more
Emily
I really loved the stories. They were so cute and I actually preferred them from some of Dr. Seuss' is more popular tales. They were very short but I could forgive it because the content was so unique and incredibly sweet. My favorite happened to be The Strange Shirt Spot and the reason was because it was so funny and in a way so ridiculous and that's what made it perfect in my opinion. Dr. Seuss never fails to amaze me. His work is extraordinary and he just so happens to be in my mind one of th...more
Edward Sullivan
Not Seuss's best work but insightful in showing how these stories were expanded later into better known works. Best story is "The Bippolo Seed."
David Edmonds
I've loved Dr. Seuss since I was a child. I'm sure at one point or another, I've read every Seuss book available (and own most of them), so when I heard that there was going to be a "new" collection of stories published, both me and my inner child squealed in delight! The stories are taken from magazines that were published between the mid 1940s to late 1950s, and hadn't really been seen since these magazines had originally been published.

These stories are quite clearly from early on in Dr. Seus...more
Sarah BT
I think this book is best enjoyed on audio with wonderful narrators!! I'm always a bit nervous about "lost" stories, but I enjoyed this collection for the most part, especially after hearing about how they were short works originally published in magazines and newspapers. I thought I'd share a breakdown of what I liked or disliked about each story:


The Bippolo Seed narrated by Neil Patrick Harris-I loved this story and I really thought it was the strongest of the book. It had the classic Seuss f...more
Samantha
Lost short stories by Seuss. These stories were originally published between 1948 and 1959. The book opens with an introduction by the world's foremost Seuss scholar, Charles D. Cohen. The introduction helps readers grasp the importance of these stories and the evolution that was taking place in Seuss's writing.

The Bippolo Seed- A duck finds a special seed that grants wishes upon the tree that sprouts. The duck originally decides that he will wish for enough duck food to last a week. Along comes...more
Big Book Little Book
I have to confess that, whilst I obviously know of 'Dr Seuss' and his quirky rhyming style and have bemusedly watched 'The Grinch' featuring Jim Carrey or, in my opinion the more enjoyable, 'Horton hears a Who', I don't think I have ever actually read any of his books.

Now that I have read, 'The Bippolo Seed' I am amazed by Dr Seuss' extraordinary mind. These 'lost' stories have no particular theme. The first two stories, the titular 'Bippolo Seed' (a cautionary tale about greed) and 'The Rabbit,...more
Thomas Holbrook

Ted Geisel (a. k. a. Dr. Seuss) may come to be known throughout Literary History on a par with the Brothers’ Grimm and Aesop (of Fable fame). His ability to speak directly to a salient point, give smiles to children (irrespective of their age) and create memorable characters tell of his talent as a poet, ability as a story teller and his gift of imagination. When these seven stories were “discovered” (actually gathered after decades), a treasure of his talents and a reminder of a world gone by...more
Joanna
The thing about Dr. Seuss is that he is completely unique. Despite all the people who have tried to imitate his particular style, this collection of his lost stories drives home the fact that no one does Seuss like Seuss.

Perhaps it is because these stories were written so many years ago, or perhaps it is because they remind me of my own childhood, but they feel like small page-sized artifacts of a time when stories were not afraid to be too silly, and were also not afraid to have a moral for fea...more
Liz
Week 6: Dr. Seuss story you haven't read before

Duck finds a box that holds a Bippolo Seed. He is instructed to count to three, plant the seed, and wish for something and his wishes will grow out of the Bippolo Tree. Duck is just about to plant the seed when Cat walks by and wonders why Duck wished for so little. Why not wish for all sorts of things. Duck and Cat imagine all sorts of things to wish for, things they can sell and get rich on. As their wishes get bigger and bigger, wilder and wilder...more
Suzanne Moore
I listened to this with my grandchildren in the car. They've read Dr. Suess before, but hearing the stories isn't the same without seeing the pictures. Dr. Suess has some fantastical creatures and the names of some of them definitely stirred my imagination. Gustav, the Goldfish was one story I could truly visualize, having read Fish Out of Water by Dr. Suess's wife Helen. I loved this story as a child. I remember living in St. Louis, we actually had a basement like the one that the boy filled wi...more
Andy Shuping
This book presents seven "lost" stories written by Ted Gissel before he became known worldwide as Dr. Seuss, for publication in various magazines. The stories are considered "lost" because they were never republished in book format and many fans of Dr. Seuss, including myself, had no idea that the stories ever existed. The book features a comprehensive introduction that lay out the stories, their life, and how some fans were aware of the stories and greatly enjoyed them. The stories feature Dr....more
Hali French
I loved this book and love Dr. Seuss of course, all his work I have encountered since childhood has been amazing! This children's book of his was really special (I think) because it has many short stories inside this one book. The stories in here are all quite silly and rhyme with pretty simple words for young readers in elementary school, but I believe all ages could enjoy this (I know I still did). Each story in here has a secret message or lesson behind it. One teaches children to listen to t...more
Jessica Harrison
Review via Cracking the Cover

Each of these tales is a rhythmical delight with the tongue-twisting text we’ve come to expect from Dr. Seuss. The illustrations are wacky, playful and colorful, but there aren’t as many as readers are used to with Seuss’ other books. That means there’s lots of block text, and that may a bit discouraging for younger readers. The good news, however, is that Seuss’ writing evokes images on it’s own and each of these tales is sure to spark imagination.

An introduction to...more
David
Mar 16, 2012 David rated it 3 of 5 stars
Shelves: 2012
Mixed bag of seven lost stories. The best of the bunch is "Tadd and Todd", featuring the Seussian absurdist lengths one twin goes to as an attempt to avoid being confused with his brother, and the other's determination to keep up with the changes. "The Rabbit, The Bear, and the Zinniga-Zanniga" and "Gustav the Goldfish" are good. "The Strange Shirt Spot" is obviously an early draft of "The Cat in the Hat Comes Back". The remaining three stories (including the title story) are all rather mediocre...more
Nick
This is a collection of some of Dr. Seuss's short pieces, originally published in Redbook magazine in 1950 and 1951. Some of them served as early models for later picture books, but others were never fleshed out or re-used. In addition, there is a short introductory essay by a Seussian scholar, which has some fascinating tidbits about the development of the famous Dr. Seuss style.
While these stories are individually very short, they will make good read-alouds for kids, and some kids will appreci...more
Dolly
Feb 04, 2012 Dolly rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: parents reading with their children
This is an interesting collection of short stories by Dr. Seuss. I was so excited and surprised to see a new book of tales and we just had to read them right away. The introduction mentions that this was a selection of "lost" stories that had been published separately in magazines in the early 1950s, but subsequently forgotten. Some of the stories seemed somewhat familiar, but I cannot say for sure if or where I'd read them before. Otherwise, these "lost" stories were new to me and I was so happ...more
Edward Creter
20 years after his death, Dr. Seuss still has staying power with kids of all ages. The proof is in this collection of 6 lost stories recently unearthed thru his archives. A must read and must enjoy for his legions of Seussiples around the world!
Elizabeth
I listened to this in its Audiobook format and was absolutely delighted by Neil Patrick Harris, etc. who lent their voices to Dr. Seuss' lost tales. Truly lovely, and I'm so glad they were compiled together!
Philip Burt
A duck and a cat want to make their wishes grow,
with a magic bippolo seed, "well, now, what do you know!"
A rabbit counts a bear's uneven lashes on his eyes,
and tells about the Zinniga-Zanniga, and other lies.
A boy learns what happens if he overfeeds his goldfish,
Niagara Falls might as well be this fishes new dish.
Tadd and Todd are twins, and only if people knew,
"Which one is what one, and what one is who?"
Another boy brags about steak for supper on Saturday,
And finds himself in a pickle to tickl...more
Shaida Hossein
Some things in life should remain loss and this is one of those things. I grew up reading Dr. Seuss and maybe these "lost stories" should have just been published in magazines. The stories in this book are The Bippolo Seed, The Rabbit, the Bear, and the Zinniga-Zanniga, Gustav, the Goldfish, Tadd and Todd, Streak for Supper, The Strange Shirt Spot, The Great Henry McBride. If I had to pick a favorite it would be The Bippolo Seed; however, The Strange Shirt Spot and The Great Henry McBride were r...more
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Theodor Seuss Geisel was born 2 March 1904 in Springfield, MA. He graduated Dartmouth College in 1925, and proceeded on to Oxford University with the intent of acquiring a doctorate in literature. At Oxford he met Helen Palmer, who he wed in 1927. He returned from Europe in 1927, and began working for a magazine called Judge, the leading humor magazine in America at the time, submitting both carto...more
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