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The Adventures of Tintin, Vol. 3: The Crab With the Golden Claws / The Shooting Star / The Secret of the Unicorn
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The Adventures of Tintin, Vol. 3: The Crab With the Golden Claws / The Shooting Star / The Secret of the Unicorn (Tintin #9, 10, 11)

4.28 of 5 stars 4.28  ·  rating details  ·  1,445 ratings  ·  34 reviews
Three classic graphic novels in one deluxe hardcover edition: The Crab with the Golden Claws, The Shooting Star, and The Secret of the Unicorn.
Hardcover, 192 pages
Published May 2nd 1994 by Little, Brown Books for Young Readers (first published June 1993)
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Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 1,986)
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Noelle Maryam
Tintin the reporter goes on adventures with his friend Captain Haddock and his dog Snowy. In this volume the adventures take place in the desert, and an island and the sea.
Jan 05, 2014 Daniel rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Daniel by: my much younger self
I've very very slowly been re-reading Tintin for the past 10 years or so. At last with this volume it feels like the Tintin I remember from my childhood. Captain Haddock has been introduced, the plots feel inventive and surprising, and there's a good mix of slapstick and more sophisticated humour.

I dare say there's a thesis of some kind to be had from the (obvious?) observation that Tintin and Captain Haddock each represent aspects of the mind that can't really exist healthily on their own: Tin
The Tintin stories for anyone who has read them and understands their history can't be viewed as anything other than groundbreaking. The beginnings of these stories have been around as long as the Lord of the Rings, the illustration and environments in the Tintin books are accurate and extremely detailed. Anyone who has spent even a little time exploring Herge (Georges Remi) can see the painstaking research and adversity he worked through to compose the world around Tintin. His ideas were ahead ...more
Jon M
Follow Tintin and his loyal companion, dog, snowy, as they travel to all sorts of new places!

Meet Captain Haddock, Captain of the ship: The Karaboudjan. And meet Alan, the first mate, who has kept the captain drunk and unable to take charge of the ship, while they secretly smuggled drugs, cleverly hidden inside crab tins, in the ship, where no one would find them (the captain is too busy to go anywhere, held captive in his cabin, drunk, unaware of anything that is going on). And when they captur
The Adventures of Tintin just keep getting better. I especially liked The Shooting Star in this volume. A meteor hits the Earth and the race is on to find where it hit, so as to extract any precious elements the rock might contain. Tintin gets recruited by the scientists, who wish to examine the meteor to further humankind's knowledge, which pits him against the barons of industry who would only wish to turn a profit from its discovery. A really fun story.

The Secret of the Unicorn is the basis f
Volume 3, Books 7-9.

"The Crab with the Golden Claws": Tintin is abducted by opium smugglers, meets Capt. Haddock, and goes on a wild desert adventure. The plane crash in the desert and rescue by Legionares appears in the movie, "The Adventures of Tintin".

"The Shooting Star": A meteor crash sends Tintin and friends on a race to the Arctic to claim a new metal.

"The Secret of the Unicorn": Tintin finds part of a treasure map in a model ship. Its theft leads him on a hunt to retrieve it and the miss
Patrick Nguyen
It seems that everywhere Tin-Tin goes, there's always a problem. But there's always a solution to it, which is good. In this volume, Tin-Tin has found an small old antique ship that could cost millions! Just right after the cashier sold the antique to him, two crazy men come barging at Tin-Tin beggin them to sell the ship to them. But he declines saying that it is for his old friend. When Tin-Tin gets back to the Captains place, he shows him it. The Captain said that it was the exact same ship o ...more
Watched the movie of Tintin with my family back in May; this volume contains 2 stories which were put into the movie. Seems like I'm hooked on Tintin and want to read them all now!
Anusha Choory
The best of the Tintin series bundled into one jumbo sized book! What else could one ask for?
Vaishnav Menon
All 3 stories were better than ever
it is cool and has allot of mystery
i still love the clean art & the straight-ahead adventure stories in tintin books. things i don't like: almost complete lack of female characters, and problematic portrayals of alcoholism and non-white races. a question to others: how much of a pass do you give a work like this that was written in a different era? i suppose it might depend on the context... even though i enjoyed these when i was young, and enjoyed re-reading these as an adult, i don't know if i'd feel comfortable recommendin ...more
Tintin manages once again to be the only person to come across the relevant events and information by chance that sets him on his next random adventure. Leaving aside the believability of such random happenstance, the stories have definitely improved. There's still a lot to be desired in these volume. Especially as the final story pretty much leads right into a direct sequel in the next volume. Considering that many of the stories are not really tied together, it makes things seem rather odd to ...more
The main ding against volume 3 is that it introduces Captain Haddock, who goes on to take over the role of comic relief from Thompson and Thomson and to pretty much overwhelm the storylines as they go on. Tintin becomes less of a quick-thinking, daredevil reporter out on awesome adventures and gradually becomes mostly the straight man for Haddock's drunken screw-ups.

My personal bias aside, I can't deny that The Secret of The Unicorn and its sequel, Red Rackham's Treasure (in the next volume) are
Jun 25, 2015 PWRL marked it as to-read
Shelves: zzz2015-jun-new
This volume contains three of the weaker Tintin stories, most notable of which is The Shooting Star, which is quite frankly pretty silly. Although Captain Haddock first joins the party in The Crab with the Golden Claws, there is little else to recommend these stories over some of the really classic Tintin adventures, such as Tintin in Tibet or Land of Black Gold. In many ways, the present volume is appropriate for Tintin completists only.
Aaron Kaase
Volume 3 of 7 volume series, each of these contain three Tintin books. I like these books because they're compact and don't take a lot of shelf space. The printing quality is very good: rich color ink on nice, smooth paper. The only complaint I have is with the physical dimensions of the books, which are 45% smaller than the traditional albums. That said, they are no substitute for the original albums if you are a serious Tintin fan or collector, as I am.
Louise (A Strong Belief in Wicker)
I didn't read Tintin as a child, so I used the recent movie to get to know Tintin a bit. I enjoyed reading the stories, but wasn't completely swept up into Tintin's world. Although I do love Captain Haddock, quite a lot. I'm sure all the hard drinking sailor jokes would not have registered with me when I was a kid. These books are quite a small format, not the original large format the books were designed for- they do suffer for it, which is a shame.
This very enjoyable collection of Tintin adventures made me laugh, kept me on the edge of my seat, and gave made me see some things that we now take for granted, technology-wise, at least. (These were written in the 40's, but they are timeless as ever.) The Crab with the Golden Claw is one of my favorite Tintin stories, and I recommend it particularly highly.
Kevin Magpoc
I'm partial to the kind of comic book that has plenty of action and adventure but still takes the time to give us a dash of slapstick and verbal jokes. This set, in particular, makes me wish I knew someone who could rattle off such a varying and unusual array of insults as Captain Haddock can dish out!
I quite look forward to reading the rest.
Probably my favourite set of the Tin Tin comics as this is the introduction to Captain Haddock, the best drunk ever. I have always adored "The Shooting Star" just because I adore Tin Tin's reaction to the end results, but "The Secret of the Unicorn" has the origins of Haddock's family and the drunkin' fight scene. Tough call here! :)
Rosette Adel
This review is for The Crab with the Golden Claws.

Tintin played Sherlock with his friends Snowy, Thomson and Thompson plus Captain Haddock. They even reached Sahara by doing so. Fun to read, and the twins are humorous as ever.
I really liked "The Shooting Star" out of three stories in this collection. Overall, however, I didn't like these stories as much as some of the later ones.
Tintin is fabulous fun, fast moving adventure with sudden laughs and great details. The art is crisp and gives notable added details. Totally a winner!
More and more enamored of these adventure tales. Clean artwork, stories that are true to the era they depict, and the hero is always the hero.
Horrible edition. Just because the text and images are still clear when you shrink them, doesn't mean it still works as well.
Elaine Lortz
Judah sat down and read this one as soon as we brought it home from the library - and finished it before lunch.
Again, entertaining adventure comics, but racist artist/writer.
Tintin fights gangsters with his friend Captain Haddock.
I haven't read these for years. They hold up so well!
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Georges Prosper Remi (22 May 1907 – 3 March 1983), better known by the pen name Hergé, was a Belgian comics writer and artist.
His best known and most substantial work is The Adventures of Tintin comic book series, which he wrote and illustrated from 1929 until his death in 1983, leaving the twenty-fourth Tintin adventure Tintin and Alph-Art unfinished. His work remains a strong influence on comics
More about Hergé...

Other Books in the Series

Tintin (1 - 10 of 26 books)
  • Tintin in the Land of the Soviets (Tintin, #1)
  • Tintin au Congo (Tintin, #2)
  • Tintin in America (Tintin, #3 )
  • Cigars of the Pharaoh (Tintin, #4)
  • Le Lotus bleu (Tintin, #5)
  • The Broken Ear (Tintin, #6)
  • The Black Island (Tintin, #7)
  • King Ottokar’s Sceptre (Tintin, #8)
  • The Crab With the Golden Claws (Tintin, #9)
  • The Shooting Star (Tintin, #10)

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