Star Trek Log One (Star Trek: Logs #1)
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Star Trek Log One (Star Trek: Logs #1)

3.61 of 5 stars 3.61  ·  rating details  ·  537 ratings  ·  24 reviews
The first in a series of Star Trek: The Animated Series adaptations. Published by Ballantine Books in June 1974. Including adaptations for:

- Beyond The Farthest Star (Kirk's crew come across an ancient derelict vessel, but something is still living inside it.)

- Yesteryear (Spock travels back in time to prevent his own demise during his youth on Vulcan.)

- One Of Our Planets...more
Paperback, 184 pages
Published June 12th 1974 by Ballantine Books (first published 1974)
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Read Ng

This is a collection of three story adaptations of episodes from the Star Trek animated series. All of these tales are pretty short reads. I recall seeing these episodes on the air many years ago.

The stories are very true to what you would expect for the time they were written. Stories ran shorter than a regular episode, in keeping with a shorter time slot. Of all the tales, I appreciated yesteryear the most. Who doesn't like a good story centered around Spock and the Guardian of Forever? I woul...more
Baal Of
I first read this book sometime in grade school. After that, I collected most of the other Star Trek Logs, but never read them. After carrying them around through college, and then several moves in my adult life, I gradually lost them, mostly through poor storage conditions. Through the great paperbackswap.com site, I've now got the whole series again, and I'm actually going to read them all.
Reading this first volume took me right back to what I loved about the original series, so my 4 stars is...more
Rob
I don't kow how the 'Dean' did it, but he made these thirty-minute animated scripts every bit as satisfying as James Blish's transformation of the original series.
Morbus Iff
The Animated Series was a lot better than most would believe.
Seth Kenlon
The Animated Series of Star Trek was fantastic, at least storywise. It suffered badly from really poor animation quality (and IMHO poor music) but the stories were there and, hey, it's more Trek stories.

This book takes a few episodes of the animated series and gives them to us back-to-back. Alan Dean Foster strings them together with little touches of continuity that was not in the original series. The stories are mostly good, and Foster's addition to character motivations and what's going on in...more
Matt
Sep 18, 2013 Matt rated it 3 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Star Trek fans
Shelves: science-fiction
Star Trek: Log One by Alan Dean Foster features three short stories adapted from "the best episodes" Star Trek: The Animated Series (TAS). The three episodes are in order "Beyond the Farthest Star", "Yesteryear", and "One of Our Planets is Missing" which correspond with the first three episodes of TAS which makes one think they just adapted all the stories of TAS into books to make money, but that is another discussion all together. The three stories are loosing connected as Foster presents them...more
Ronald
"Star Trek: Log One" is basically just three episodes from the animated series put down on paper, with around 60 pages devoted to each (give or take). Though if you're like me and never watched the cartoon, then it's like a whole new set of adventures for the Enterprise and her crew (and you can imagine it with the real actors in your mind). The writing is pretty good, all things considered (aside from a number of typographical errors that should have been caught prior to publishing). The proble...more
Julie *Friday's Child*
Much more complex and wordy than Blish's. I'm not obsessively familiar with Animated Series episodes as I am with TOS (I know what they're about but not all the details) so I can't really judge what was changed or added (if anything). I do know Yesteryear by heart, though, and it struck me as really faithful to the original. All stories are longer than any Blish adaptation, but it never feels forced and they're all well fleshed-out. I especially loved Yesteryear - it was personal and rang very t...more
Vincent Darlage
Overall, a good collection of Star Trek sci-fi stories, often with a real sense of jeopardy involved.
Amadeo Donofrio
Light fun read for the Star Trek fan. These stories follow the script of the animated Star Trek series released in the '70's, although they read much better than their low budget animation counterparts. It's fun to see some of the lesser characters develop and play more significant roles, thus reminding you that the entire crew of the Enterprise can be entertaining (ie it's not just the Kirk/Spock/McCoy show).
Robert
It was okay
Rich Meyer
While nowhere near as good as James Blish's Trek adaptations, the tales in this first log do manage to expand a bit on the limited stories of the animated series, though most of the Enterprise crew walks in and out of character as they please. These stories were dated when they were broadcast, much less when they were adapted.
Charles
As a Star Trek Geek, I even enjoyed the episodes from the Cartoon version of Star Trek. I thought the Star Trek Logs in general added some fun dimensions to the stories and readily give most of them pretty good ratings.
Cary Spratt
Sooo much better than James Blish's novelizations of TOS episodes. Alan Dean Foster turns these novelizations of TAS episodes into great short stories. Makes me wish he'd written the others, too.
Curtiss
Three episodes from the Animated Star Trek Saturday morning cartoon series have been adapted by Alan Dean Foster in novella form. Nearly the only format available of the Animated Star Trek series.
Allison
I think that reading a novelized version of a 1970s cartoon, which itself was a spin-off from a 1960s TV show may be so lame, that it is, in point of fact, awesome.
Chris
A surprisingly decent novelization of three Animated Series episodes - from the era when Star Trek novels were written by authors like Foster, Blish and Macintyre.
ADD
Good old Star Trek. Just like watching the animated series so long ago. Refreshing, light-hearted change from my usual reading. Enjoyable and quick.
Stephen
Well written, I read this book the first time over 30 years ago when I was in High School. Better than most of the newer star trek books i've read.
Andrew Babb
Very interesting adaptation of the animated series. Good variety of stories. I look forward to reading more.
William J. Meyer
Fun to revisit the classic animated episodes, "Beyond the Farthest Star" and "Yesteryear."
Lynda
The logs are based on the Star Trek cartoon series.
Brenden Riley
Brenden Riley marked it as to-read
Sep 08, 2014
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Bestselling science fiction writer Alan Dean Foster was born in New York City in 1946, but raised mainly in California. He received a B.A. in Political Science from UCLA in 1968, and a M.F.A. in 1969. Foster lives in Arizona with his wife, but he enjoys traveling because it gives him opportunities to meet new people and explore new places and cultures. This interest is carried over to his writing,...more
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