The Secret of the Old Mill (Hardy Boys, #3)
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The Secret of the Old Mill (The Hardy Boys #3)

3.75 of 5 stars 3.75  ·  rating details  ·  3,700 ratings  ·  111 reviews
Determined to learn the secret of the old mill, Frank and Joe employ a clever ruse to gain entrance and become trapped. There they unravel two mysteries, one involving a counterfeiting case and the other, a national security case their father is working on.
Hardcover, 174 pages
Published June 1st 1927 by Grosset & Dunlap (first published 1927)
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Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
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John Yelverton
The Hardy Boys try and figure out a mystery that they cannot gain access to. Not as good as Nancy Drew, but still a good read.
Tosh
Nov 14, 2007 Tosh rated it 5 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: the fellow amateur detective
The Hardy Boys may have been the first reading experience where a fellow school friend turned me on to it. So, this was last year. Kidding!

But really, I remember going to my friend's house who was a couple of doors away from me, and he had the whole collection of Hardy Boys. Most of it were old, and I gather he got them used or his parents just hand them their copies which they saved for some reason.

Nevertheless as a small teenie bopper, I went to many used bookstores and picked up the Hardy Boy...more
Becky
I once read an article about how the Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys series were written. Unsurprisingly, given the sheer number of books in each series, they weren't all written by one person -- "Carolyn Keene" and "Franklin W. Dixon" were pseudonyms for a variety of authors. They'd start off with an outline that was given to them and then fill in the rest of the story themselves. Well, whoever wrote this one didn't take any pains to stick to the two books in the series that preceded it. He completel...more
Paula
A return to my childhood. I reread this (for the first time since I was a kid) for a book challenge I'm doing. It was still entertaining and I enjoyed visiting with friends I hadn't seen in a long time. I liked reading about the characters back in the 60's when life was simpler and kids were more respectful and people were more trusting. Fun read.
Gary Butler
45th book read in 2014.

Number 178 out of 388 on my all time book list.

Follow the link below to see my video review:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YTVf7...
C.
I’m collecting both ‘Stratemeyer Syndicate’ series. By coincidence of reaching “Hardy Boys” #3 back-to-back with “Nancy Drew” #6: “The Secret Of Red Gate Farm”; I stumbled upon duplicated subject matter. It stands out because both volumes deal with counterfeiting and laundering currency and it strikes me as a crude subject for the youths targeted by these series. I’m an adult who didn’t mind this theme. Perhaps the all-age success may attribute partly to presenting topics worth warning audiences...more
Amy
My niece-in-law gave us this book as a thank you for her birthday card and cash. So far, I find it hard to believe that no one suspects the counterfeiters just might be up to their shenanigans in the old mill!! The suspense is killing me! (she types, as her blue eyes sparkle)
Jonathan Asif
If there were ten stars I would give it 10 stars. My favorite part in this book was when they heard people talking in the mill. I liked when these people ran up towards the Hardy Boys and the Hardy Boys ran the other way.
matt

Wow. It almost disturbs me how little I remember of having actually read these books.
Darcy Stewart
This Hardy Boys mystery is very exciting. There is so much suspense in this book. Many things happen. There are several mysteries going on at one time that lead to one big mystery. Chet Morton is handed a counterfeit bill and discovers this when he tries to buy a microscope. The Hardy Boys lets him borrow some money and shop owner lets him bring the rest of the money. Later on the book they find out about the old mill and find out somebody is trying to cause sabotage. Tony is later passed a coun...more
Ken
According to GoodReads rating system, 4 stars = I Really Liked It. You have to get past the idea that you CAN give a Hardy Boys book you really liked when you were 10 years old 4 stars AND you can give a book of poetry you really liked 40 years later the same rating.

So, I feel no guilt about having read every Hardy Boys I could get my hands on when I was a kid. My mom bought them for me as rewards, and when I was home sick from school for a few days. Thanks Mom, you helped make me a reader!

I par...more
D. Martin
There is no Franklin W. Dixon. He's a pseudonym for numerous ghost writers. Somewhere, I read that the original "Dixon" (Leslie McFarlane, who wrote the first 15-20 Hardy Boys novels, I believe) stopped writing Hardy Boys stories because the publisher kept asking him to dumb it down for the younger audience. But this particular Dixon cared too much about writing a good story with good characters, so he left. Then, when it came to reprint time, the publisher went through the original books and ed...more
St[♥]r Pr!nc:$$ N[♥]wsheen pictures, pictures, pictures ||| ♥ waking in the snow ||||| ♥ tracing steps to
I must say I had a very different childhood from everyone else in the neighbourhood or even in the crappy school i went to. Cos, while all the other girls played with dolls and dreamed of an early marriage, I used to spend endless hours reading Hardy Boys mysteries. My dad was the one (as usual) who introduced me to these two fearless American brothers when I was 7 or 8. The Clue of the Screeching Owl (Hardy Boys who else) was the first real book that was presented to me at a special family even...more
Muzzlehatch
Nov 19, 2008 Muzzlehatch rated it 2 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: nostalgia buffs only
Shelves: juvenile
Frank and Joe investigate a series of counterfeit $20 bills that have been circulating in Bayport; meanwhile, their father "famous detective Fenton Hardy" is working on a case that will end up converging with theirs. I don't remember these books too well, but I'm guessing this kind of thing happened often; in any case, it's fairly well done here. Most of the plot, alas, was pretty cardboard even when I first read it 34 years or so ago. I'm not sure if I realized then that, jeez, those Hardys are...more
Julie
I read a 1927 edition of this book that I got for free at a yard sale. I much prefer reading series like this (like Nancy Drew) in their original format/language, instead of the revised '60s or later editions.

This was a fun, quick read, although there are some serious issues going on. The Hardy boys and their father Fenton have no respect at all for the local police force and the boys consistently put themselves in serious danger trying to do "detective work" so that they can get the credit/rewa...more
Brenda
The Hardy boys have a new fan, it took more than one book to do it, but I am definitely a fan. This book has so many twists, you could get lost if the writing wasn't so superb and manage to keep you focused throughout the entire story.
Before you read further, I don't write spoilers, so its safe to read my reviews!
It all begins when the Hardy boys, Joe and Frank 's friend Chet is given a counterfeit $20 and all of a sudden Joe and Frank have a new case. One they end up working alone, because t...more
Greg
Apr 15, 2014 Greg rated it 4 of 5 stars
Shelves: 2014
Yes, the Hardy Boys books are corny by today's standards of popular literature, but I imagine in 90 years "The Hunger Games" will be viewed as "old" and "lame." Enjoy your depressing dystopian novels, while I read stories where a detective survives a large warehouse explosion and goes home to be served a glass of lemonade by his son.
Gabriel
Being the first book I have read from the originals hardy boys series, i can say it is amazing. It instantly got me hooked into the series with the action and adventure. I also loved the tension when the boys are in the mill.
Josh Tudor
Feb 28, 2011 Josh Tudor added it
Shelves: 3rd-quarter
When more ominous warnings follow, Frank and Joe suspect there is a link between the counterfeiting case they are investigating and a secret case their father cannot discuss because it involves national security.The key to the solution of both cases appears o be hidden in the old Turner Mill, constructed in frontier days but now a gatehouse for Elekton Controls Limited engaged in manufacturing top-secret electronic parts for space missiles. But the millhouse is occupied by two Elekton employees...more
Kelly
These books have held Christian's attention like no others.Christian really liked this book. I thought it was okay. Here is what an eight year old had to say about it.
"The mystery was awesome. I liked that the brothers didn't get help from grown-ups and they just did what they could do. And they did their best and that was all that they could do and that was enough."
Something that I did like about the book is that it has old fashioned values and that it show brothers working together - somethin...more
Kate
Kept M thoroughly engaged, although I had to update the language in places. These boys do things no child today could do.... And I think that's what makes it so appealing.
Gabriel Wallis
What a great way to start the year off, finishing the third book in The Hardy Boys mystery series. I've had a bunch of The Hardy Boys books on my bookshelves for years, and have never really read them until now. I find them to be simple and easy reads, which is just what I need sometimes. They're a quick mystery to try and solve... maybe before Frank and Joe do in the book. Unfortunately, I wasn't able to solve the mystery of "The Secret of the Mill" myself before the Hardy boys did. I'm looking...more
Plainfield Public Library District
I registered a book at BookCrossing.com!
http://www.BookCrossing.com/journal/12460507
Erik Dorf
Good book

I loved the book.It was very exiting .The characters are very great and I love how the book is written
Jason
obviously very predictable, but still a great hoot to read
Truly
Dapat bocoran kalo buku jenis ini didiskon 50 % di salah satu toko buku yang ada di pasbar. THX buat Adrian atas infonya ^_^ Begitu selesai acara launching di lokasi yang enggak jauh, segera meluncur kesana....

Lumayan nemu dua seri dari dua kakak beradik hardy
Kisahnya menawan seperti biasa.
Yang patut diacungi jempol adalah semangat Keluarga Hardy yang pantang menyerah ketika sedang menyelidiki sebuah kasus. Ancaman akan dianggap angin lalu...... Pokoke sebelum misteri terpecahkan mereka tidak a...more
Joy Gerbode
Another light, quick read, very enjoyable.
Dave
I always liked the Hardy Boys books when I was little. I found a few when I was cleaning out some boxes and thought I would see if they were still as good as I remember. What I discovered, now that I am older, is that they were always eating. Someone packed a lunch, they stopped for a snack, had a huge breakfast before leaving the house, found some milk and cake/pie/cookies for a late night snack. Also, other that a mention of New York City, the locations are so vague that they could be anywhere...more
Kristine Pratt
What is it about bad guys that make them tell all their secrets when they catch the good guys? I mean, what's the point? Is it ego? Overly convenient writing device?

sigh.

On the other hand, there was a lot of action and adventure in this offering, and somehow they even managed to get tangled in their father's case...again? Funny how these things keep linking up...

OK, I'll quit complaining. It was fun to read. Not the greatest in the series, but not the worst either. I'd still recommend it.
Adam
I initially found this entry in the series confusing because I kept reading the word "counterfeit" as "Confederate," and I couldn't understand why merchants and shopkeepers in Bayport were having such trouble differentiating between US greenbacks and C.S.A. funny money from the 1860s. Eventually, however, I figured out what counterfeiting actually entailed, which greatly increased my enjoyment of this book. (Not to mention making me obsessed with counterfeiting.)
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1879
Franklin W. Dixon is the pen name used by a variety of different authors (Leslie McFarlane, a Canadian author, being the first) who wrote The Hardy Boys novels for the Stratemeyer Syndicate (now owned by Simon & Schuster). This pseudonym was also used for the Ted Scott Flying Stories series.
More about Franklin W. Dixon...
The Tower Treasure (Hardy Boys, #1) The House on the Cliff (Hardy Boys, #2) Hardy Boys Complete Series Set Books 1-66 (The Hardy Boys #1-66) The Missing Chums (Hardy Boys, #4) Hunting for Hidden Gold (Hardy Boys, #5)

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