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Sexually, I'm More of a Switzerland: More Personal Ads from the London Review of Books

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3.61 of 5 stars 3.61  ·  rating details  ·  172 ratings  ·  29 reviews
Straight from British shores, here is another dose of love, or the lack of it, from the pages of the London Review of Books. The editor of They Call Me Naughty Lola has cooked up yet another irresistible collection of brilliant, bawdy and often absurd personal ads from the world's funniest, and smartest, lonely-hearts column. These ads prove that even if you're lonely, you ...more
ebook, 192 pages
Published February 2nd 2010 by Scribner (first published January 11th 2010)
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Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 398)
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Inken Purvis
This isn't really a book that you finish. It's one of those that you keep on your bedside table for occasional dipping into when you're feeling down and need a hilariously cynical pick-me-up. Another book that only the English could publish, Sexually I'm More of a Switzerland is the collection of wonderfully dark, naughty and ridiculous personal ads published in the London Review of Books. These are the antithesis of the desperately and nauseatingly cheerful ads that you see on US dating websi ...more
Roz Warren
LAUGHING AND LOOKING FOR LOVE

“Sexually, I’m More of a Switzerland” is the second collection of personal ads from the London Review of Books, and a more entertaining series of outrageous little paragraphs you will never encounter.

Culled by editor David Rose from among that weekly’s more ordinary adverts, these seekers of love are smart and literate (there are footnotes!); their clever, lighthearted prose is equal parts courtship and comedy. Most of these scribes are middle-aged and older, with
...more
Valerie
Impossible to put down. I could easily be at least three of these people....
Sample: "Ball-breaking, irrational F (52). Very probably just like your mother...."
It helps to be English, but there are useful footnotes.
Margie
These are marvelous. Best loo reading ever.

If you have an appreciation for British humor, these lonely hearts adverts will have you laughing. A lot.
Gemma
Very funny, can't believe some of these are real! Nice bit of light reading and the kind of book you can pick up anytime and still find funny!
Lee
The Goodreads Lonely Hearts Column

A man walks into a bookshop. Plucking up his courage he asks the lady behind the till for a date. She says sorry, we don't sell fruit here. That's funny, right? Right?! I'm funny, right? M, 54, seeks F with convincing fake laugh to reassure him of an evening. Box no. 0002.

A (different) man walks into (the same) bookshop. Fancying a good belly laugh he picks up a collection of bizarre entries to the world's most intelligent lonely hearts column. M, 27, found dr
...more
Wendyhodges
Very funny read, though I'm not sure which was more entertaining the adverts or the footnotes detailing the various references in the ads.
Cassandra Joseph
If you like reading personal ads for the fun of it. If you like sarcastic British humor, then this is for you...some were groaners, others were laugh out loud funny!
Saara
Less laugh-out-loud and more sympathy-inducing than I expected. The self-deprecating humour in these adverts touches something inside a fellow socially awkward penguin, British or not. Recommended for absolutely everyone, but especially for those who are more comfortable dealing with inanimate objects than fellow mammals.
Anna
Collected personal ads from the London Review of Books. Made me laugh a lot but also made me very glad that I am not out there looking for love.
"I am not as high maintenance as my highly polished and impeccably arranged collection of porcelain cats suggests, but if you touch them I will kill you. F, 36. Likes porcelain cats. Seeks man not unused to the sound of sobbing coming from a bedroom door from which he is strictly prohibited. Tell me how attractive I am at box no. 1123."
"No beards. F, 38
...more
Krista
Some of them were just meh, but there are plenty of laughs to be had when reading this short and quirky book full of personal ads - most of which are straight up ridiculous. If you want a quick, funny read, then you'll most likely enjoy reading this.
Jennifer
The London Review of Books: Guaranteeing I don't have to come up with my own pithy "About Me" statements for the last four years. This follow-up to 2006's "They Call Me Naughty Lola" lacks the shockingly original punch of the first volume, but manages to keep the parade of crazy going strong...and leaves you pondering the terrifying possibility that most of these ads aren't, in fact, intended to be tongue-in-cheek.
Teresa
This book is funny in a way that only Brits can be. Fully of perfectly worded whacky personal ads from the London Review of Books, edited and introduced by David Rose. At least read his introduction for erudite and gorgeous writing. Read the personals and laugh! Great book. Now I have to read the first one, They Call Me Naughty Lola.
Melissainau
Ads range from the kooky

my advert comes in the form of interpretive dance. Man, 62

I've kissed too many frogs in search of my prince. Woman,32. Retired from amphibian zoology very much against her will.


To the just plain weird. But the end effect is funny, although this is not a read in one night proposition.
Susan
Came across a review in wall street journal and this sounds awesome. British understatement meets romance. Sample: "Think of every sexual partner you've ever had. I'm nothing like them. Unless you've ever slept with a bulimic German cellist named Elsa. Elsa: bulimic German cellist (F, 37)."
Lynda
Funny!! This book had some serious laugh out loud moments -- which must have been annoying to Joe as I constantly interrupted his reading to tell him the ones that struck me as particularly funny. We had read They Call Me Naughty Lola so I knew what to expect and wasn't disappointed.
Laura
Very amusing - though not to the same degree as the first volume (They Call Me Naughty Lola). The intro references three of my very favorite people - Morrissey, Alan Bennett and Philip Larkin - which will help you decide whether this sort of humor is your cup of tea or not!
Susan Rose
This is a really good put-down-pick-up type book to put on a coffee table and just read bits occasionally. Basically these are intellectual peresonal ads and are really entertaining to read.
Martina
Very funny - the first 30 pages or so. Then it became a bit repetitive but I persevered. After a further 20 odd pages I got bored and stopped. But perhaps other readers feel differently.
Isabel
I abandoned reading this. It's not that bad, but after 50 pages of the same sort of crazy personal ads I got bored and I can't muster reading another 100 pages.
Kameswari
Read it , loved it. This is the real world. No time or era can be more beautifully explained than through the personal ads of the day. I am reading it again.
Christiana
Dudes, there are some crazies out there. And they want to be in love. I don't know how I feel about that.
Evan
Jan 29, 2010 Evan marked it as to-read  ·  review of another edition
Reviewed on EW.com. This looks to be hilarious and along the same lines as "Milk, Eggs, Vodka"
briethehippo
Both funny and also sometimes incredibly sad at the same time.
Jackie
Match.com for smart people. Laughed until a cried.
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They Call Me Naughty Lola: Personal Ads from the London Review of Books

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