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A Heritage of Stars
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A Heritage of Stars

3.52 of 5 stars 3.52  ·  rating details  ·  201 ratings  ·  13 reviews
Thousands of years into the future man has completely destroyed a technology-based society and lives a tribal existence, worshipping the 'brain'-cases of long-rusted robots. Here and there pockets of knowledge remain, and young Tom Cushing lives in one such university. His imagination fired by reading of the fabled 'Place of Going to the Stars' in an ancient manuscript, he ...more
Paperback, 215 pages
Published June 1st 1978 by Berkley (first published 1977)
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Mcgyver5
nice and short without much room for a sophisticated plot or description or character development. It features travels over some of the geographic features of a Minnesota of the distant future. The tone reminded me of the CS Lewis Space trilogy. It touches on interesting themes like alien intelligence and even a sort of historical dialectic. For example, it posits that our technological society is missing something and that its eventual destruction and combination with new factors might allow th ...more
Robert 'Rev. Bob'
This was written in 1977, but it feels a lot older than that; there's a definite Golden Age style to it. The plot is simple enough: about 1500 years ago, humans smashed most of their technology, purged the knowledge of how to rebuild it from their libraries, and has been living in a generally savage state ever since. The main character was raised in a university that seems more like a monastery, which may be the only place of learning left on the planet. He comes across a vague reference to a st ...more
Mark
I'm a sucker for novels about dystopias (Nineteen Eighty-four, The Handmaid's Tale), the end of the world (Lucifer's Hammer, The Road), or how humanity continues to scrape by several generations after the "end" of the world (as we know it, anyway). The first book I read, long ago, that fits into this latter genre was John Robert Russell's Sar , which was engrossing to a pre-teen but, if I'm being honest, mostly because of all the sex the main character was having. The second, and far better, boo ...more
Lysergius
Thousands of years into the future man has completely destroyed a technology-based society and lives a tribal existence, worshipping the 'brain'-cases of long-rusted robots. Here and there pockets of knowledge remain, and young Tom Cushing lives in one such university. His imagination fired by reading of the fabled 'Place of Going to the Stars' in an ancient manuscript, Tom sets out on a long odyssey to find out if the legend is true. His journey encompasses excitement, danger and some strange a ...more
Jonathan Bocock
I think I read this in the 4th or 5th grade, and it really stuck with me. I don't think I would have ever found it again without the internet - well, that and the fact that it has a grizzly hunting robot (the best kind of rust protection, or so it believes). It's still as good as I thought the first time around & a solid mix of technology and what borders on magic. Great stuff.
Pickle
I enjoyed this far more than i was expecting... i think the fact the front cover had little to do with the book threw me.

Technology failed 500-1000 years ago, man vented his anger towards the technology and smashed it all to pieces. At the point of failure man was traveling beyond out solar system.

what remains tribes, nomands and a university. A student decides to leave the uni to go search for a Place Going to the Stars, an old legend. On his travels he meets a nice witch with feeble powers, th
...more
Ramon Yáñez lópez
Totalmente imprescindible. De lo mejor que tenia en la estanteria por leer. Ni me atrevo a hacer un spoiler.

Repito, imprescindible.
Chris
This is basically a light adventure story set in a post-apocalyptic future in which nearly all machines have been disabled or destroyed. The protagonist gets it into his head to go exploring, leaving the relative safety of the university (or what's left of it). Although many new characters join his traveling party, there's very little character development. It's as though Simak was only thinking about how to progress the plot while being completely unconcerned with how to craft his characters. T ...more
Neil
There's something a little too formulaic and plotting by the numbers about this one of Simak's about a diverse assembled-by-fate bunch on a quest. Some of the characters are really pretty thin. But you know if you're a Simak-head (Hey I just made that up!) like me, you'll find a way to forgive him, even for the witch.
Greg Williamson
An odd book. A collection of wonders; imaginative scenes strung together with barely any narrative. Was glad when it was finished.
Booknerd Fraser
This late Simak is almost identical to the novel that followed it, and not very good
Kerri-ann
Jupiter Award for Best Novel (1978)
Patrick Smith
Patrick Smith marked it as to-read
Dec 12, 2014
Steve
Steve marked it as to-read
Dec 04, 2014
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23012
"He was honored by fans with three Hugo awards and by colleagues with one Nebula award and was named the third Grand Master by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) in 1977." (Wikipedia)

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clifford...
More about Clifford D. Simak...
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