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Record Store Days: From Vinyl to Digital and Back Again
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Record Store Days: From Vinyl to Digital and Back Again

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3.8 of 5 stars 3.80  ·  rating details  ·  99 ratings  ·  21 reviews
There’s nothing as glamorous as a record store.” Paul McCartney



In this era of digital downloads, the small, indie record shop might sound like an anachronism. But, in fact, record stores served as community centers, information exchanges, clubs, art galleries, and launching pads for numerous bands and record labels. Record Store Days takes a long, loving look back at the
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Hardcover, 256 pages
Published April 6th 2010 by Sterling (first published 2010)
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Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 223)
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Kimley
Oh, this just has to be a fun read. Gary was my boss at Licorice Pizza, an old California record store chain. He's the best kind of music geek. Can't wait to get my hands on this one.
David
Record Store Days: From Vinyl to Digital and Back Again by Gary Calamar (Sterling Publishing 2009)(780.266) was a let-down. My expectations were too high; the book is simply a paean to (mostly) large chain-record stores. It did remind me, however, of how much fun it used to be to browse and listen to what was inevitably great new music playing on the store's stereo. 3/10, finished 5/9/11.
Leila
Ah, record stores-the good old days. I've worked at 3 different ones. Gary was my first record store boss-looking forward to what he has to say!
Blog on Books


Q: How do you cram five decades into 5 minutes?

A: Take a stroll from LA’s Hollywood and Vine (former home of 60’s pioneer record retailer Wallach’s Music City) to Sunset and Cahuenga (the location of powerhouse indy record retailer Amoeba Music.)

This is exactly what authors Gary Calamar and Phil Gallo have done with their new book, ‘Record Store Days.’

Published in honor of (and cooperation with) the recently created ‘Record Store Day’ – a day designated to bring attention and luster to the remai
...more
Tim
Q: How do you cram five decades into 5 minutes?

A: Take a stroll from LA’s Hollywood and Vine (former home of 60’s pioneer record retailer Wallach’s Music City) to Sunset and Cahuenga (the location of powerhouse indy record retailer Amoeba Music.)

This is exactly what authors Gary Calamar and Phil Gallo have done with their new book, ‘Record Store Days.’

Published in honor of (and cooperation with) the recently created ‘Record Store Day’ – a day designated to bring attention and luster to the remai
...more
Tim Niland
This book details the trials and tribulations of the great American institution, the record store. I collected vinyl records for a long time before finally selling a few years back because the apartment was getting too crowded with boxes of LPs. Recently I began dipping a toe in the water again, picking up an inexpensive USB turntable and browsing the used bins at the remaining stores in New Jersey: The Princeton Record Exchange, Vintage Vinyl and Jack's Music Shoppe. I caught the bug early on: ...more
Dave
This book would only be interesting if you are is into vinyl and record stores as I am. Otherwise, I would skip it.
The book covers the various American record stores both in business and defunct throughout the years and contains a lot of comments and recollections from musicians, store owners, and collectors.
In-store concert performances by various acts througout the years in order to boost sales or draw attention to record stores in general are covered and we aren't talking just small indy
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Chris Aylott
This is a beautiful book that shows off the history and romance of record stores. I especially enjoyed the photos of shops from the fifties, forties and earlier in the twentieth century.

Unfortunately, the story of the independent record store is almost identical to that of the independent bookstore. The stores may have been charming and quirky, but they have been almost completely disintermediated by the changes in our culture and technology. The authors try to put on a brave face and tout some
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Scott Woods
Of all the coffee table books about record collecting in the last few years, this one stands out for its focus on the industry at large and how its changed. This was key information for me as someone into music and collecting, because it sheds light on why things are the way they are and how we can expect they might be a few years down the line. It's also a good size (thick, but not the size of a record on its face) and full of great looking sidebars and photos.

If you only get one - of the MANY
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Matthew
Some useful information for my popular music class, but mostly makes me feel like I've wandered into High Fidelity, only with less-rigorous editing. A quick read, with lots of flavor, though. I should point out that I'm completely a CD person--born too late to accumulate vinyl and born too early to trust digital downloads (or to want to jump in on the vinyl revival). However, I grok the book, and cherish my memories of trips to the Atlanta location of Tower Records and Used Kids and Magnolia Thu ...more
Tracy Pierce
This book was a lot of fun for me. In the sixties I spent a lot of time in record stores and unlike other girls my age I spent my allowance on records. It's full of pictures and the history of the almost extinct record store. I still listen to records and enjoy the artwork. Imagine going to a record store and seeing a band promoting their new album. It still happens in big cities. These stores were also a place you could chat about music while listening. The walls were covered with posters and a ...more
Ayla Martinoff
Mmmmm, liquorice pizza.
Ellie
This book, which I received for Christmas, made me so nostalgic for the days when I took my meagre paycheck to buy a new LP or two twice a month. It made me proud to be old enough to remember real record stores, filled with dozens of bins of records, with records and posters lining the walls, and falling in love with something on first listen and buying it. I find it fascinating that vinyl is making a comeback, not to mention glad that I still have all of mine.
Marc
An entertaining read about the rise and fall and recent (hopeful) rise again of independent record stores. The book is sprinkled with many confessionals from famous musicians, industry people, and store owners/proprieters, this is a great book for any music aficionado. It also includes a history of the various music formats through the years, along with highlighting various individual stores. Plenty of pictures too.
Rob
As a narrative history of the American record store, this is far from the last word, but this is a thoroughly enjoyable coffee-table history of the birth, life, decline, and rebirth of the U.S. record store. Lots of great illustrations and affectionate memories and anecdotes from celebrities and record store staff members. If you love record stores, you need to check this out.
Terry
An interesting historical snapshot of one retail spectrum. Too much repetition, though. After three mentions that Peter Buck and Michael Stipe of R.E.M. met in a record store, I was moderately irritated. After the sixth mention, I was about ready to put the book down. But I stayed with it.
Theo Feng
good read, but slightly repetitious and wordy... with it would've explored the mechanics of the record store business in more detail, such as various practices and case studies during various periods of music and retail business in the US... also, what about non-US stores?
Jacqueline115
This book brought memories of my childhood shifting through LP's that belonged to my parents and siblings. The cover, the lyrics, and pictures.
Erica Ashcroft
One of the worst edited books I've ever read. I gave it 3 stars because I loved this history do much but it really deserves 2
Joel
Couldn't get into this despite being a record junkie and having shopped at several of the stores mentioned
Gwenn
I loved this. maybe you have to be a record geek to enjoy it, but you should be anyway.
Becki
Becki marked it as to-read
Aug 25, 2015
Carson
Carson marked it as to-read
Aug 09, 2015
Michael
Michael marked it as to-read
May 12, 2015
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Laura fox marked it as to-read
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“The record store was a place of escape. It was a library and a clubhouse” - Cameron Crowe quoted” 4 likes
“National Record Mart began when Hyman Shapiro and his sons Sam and Howard opened their first music store in 1937. A tiny storefront in downtown Pittsburgh, they called it Jitterbug Records and sold used jukebox records for a dime apiece.” 1 likes
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