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Women of the Harlem Renaissance
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Women of the Harlem Renaissance

3.83 of 5 stars 3.83  ·  rating details  ·  23 ratings  ·  2 reviews
"Wall's writing is lively and exuberant. She passes her enthusiasm for these writers' works on to the reader. She captures the mood of the times and follows through with the writers' evolution--sometimes to success, other times to isolation.... Women of the Harlem Renaissance is a rare blend of thorough academic research with writing that anyone can appreciate." --Jason Za ...more
Paperback, 272 pages
Published September 1st 1995 by Indiana University Press
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Karen
Aside from concentrating on the three main literary figures, Wall did a commendable job incorporating women musicians and other artistic performers into her story, such as Bessie Smith, Josephine Baker, and Ann Spencer whose inclusion fleshes out the context of the work. Crucially, Wall also illuminated the movement to incorporate folk literature and song into the Harlem Renaissance, which Wintz ignored entirely. While she concentrated her discussion of the folk music and literature in the chapt ...more
Cara Byrne
Wall's work - part history/part critical analysis/part biography - is a fantastic introduction to lesser-heard voices of the Harlem Renaissance. Her chapters are filled with lots of biographical and historical information and are very readable and interesting, as she honors women whose names are often not as well-recognized as some of the male writers of the time, including W.E.B. Du Bois, Langston Hughes, and Richard Wright. She also notes that since other collections examining the period limit ...more
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Cheryl A. Wall is a Professor of English at Rutgers University.
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