De Bello Lemures, Or The Roman War Against The Zombies Of Armorica
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De Bello Lemures, Or The Roman War Against The Zombies Of Armorica

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3.73 of 5 stars 3.73  ·  rating details  ·  90 ratings  ·  15 reviews
This time, the isolated farmhouse is a Roman villa. A recovered Latin text tells the story of a struggle between Roman legionaries and the undead in 185 AD. Lucius Artorius Castus leads an expedition to Gaul to defeat a rebellion against the rule of the Emperor Commodus - and gets more than he bargained for when his enemies rise from the dead to fight again. The power of t...more
Paperback, 112 pages
Published October 24th 2009 by Createspace
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Marvin
De Bello Lemures is a brief but enjoyable read. The Ancient Roman Empire setting offers a unique twist to the usual hack-and-slack zombie tale but there is still plenty of hacking and slashing to be found. Subtitled "The Roman War Against the Zombies of Armorica", the novella is purported to be a document by Roman centurion Lucius Artorius Castus. The "translator" Thomas Brookside does a nice job setting the atmosphere and even includes official sounding footnotes to create an authentic look. Ov...more
Wendy
This was a quick story to read on my kindle over the course of an afternoon.

Overall, this book isn't bad -- there are some decent action sequences, and the descriptions are pretty good. There are a lot of Latin and Greek words thrown in to keep up the "authenticity" facade, so I found myself going to the annotations frequently.

I like the idea of an ancient text having a zombie tie-in, but I guess I'm too analytical and familiar with the current zombie culture to say that this book is very origi...more
Tonari
Three years ago I noticed this book in the Amazon store and thought "It would nice to have a kindle to read it..."
Then I bought the kindle, but I forgot about this work (sometimes it came to my mind like "Uh yeah! I have still to read that! But let me finish this one first...")

Now it's finally here and what can I say? It's a very nice story, the author is using the old literary tri ck where he claim himself to be the editor and translator of the real writing which is attributed to Lucius Artoriu...more
Jason Golomb
The concept of the zombie horror genre is quite simple: the dead come "alive" in sort of a sleep-walking-must-feed-on-any-living-thing trance; they attack in any way they can; they bite, they gnaw, they claw; the only way they're stopped (generally speaking) is to physically remove their heads from their bodies.

The genre master George Romero placed his "Night of the Living Dead" in a rural farm. Not unlike Jason Vorthees' Crystal Lake, a dark forboding rural America has become the standard beare...more
Neale
The Lord protect us from zombie mash-up novels - and self-published ones at that! But here's a thing. This book is really fun. Zombies in Ancient Rome? Why not?

I came upon it quite by chance, and was taken at once by its deliciously pedantic faux-academic introduction. It's not a long book, thankfully - much of its length is taken up with Penguin Classics style footnotes. But it's a hoot!

The author, Thomas Brookside, has also published a cod-Shakespearian play about the revenge of Shylock, and...more
Rhianna Schoonover
Romans, Zombies & King Arthur (the real one). Who could possibly dislike this book?

The author does a fairly decent review of some of the archaeological evidence for an actual Arthur, or at least the one that gave rise to the myth. He also weaves the story into that character's life and times with a passable hand.

I enjoy archaeology, I enjoy history, I enjoy zombies. Combine the three and you've got a book I'll read & most probably enjoy.
Fred
This is a great book! It is written as an alternate history from the perspective of a Roman Officer in Gaul who puts down an uprising of barbarians but then must deal with Zombies. Very unique, and for the most part very well written in such a way as to mimic much of the written style at the time. My only complaint is that it wasn't long enough.
Andrew Fear
I liked this a lot. Romans meet Zombies with king Arthur thrown it. It's written as an academic translation of a lost Latin text and carries it off very well. The zombie story is pretty standard, but the classical touches are nice and the use of Artorius Castus intriguing. It's short - I read it in a sitting and I strongly recommend it
Jeff
This reads quite like translated Latin. It sent me back many years to my Latin classes. At times that made it slow for me to read, as that aspect was distracting, and I could always get lost in the generous footnotes. But I'll definitely read more by this author.
Anne
In honor of Friday the 13th coinciding with a sort of Roman Halloween, I read a zombie short story. Pretty fun fake scholarship at the beginning. Spoiler:






the Zombies vs Legionnaires ultimate outcome is unresolved when the manuscript ends.
Andre
This was a fun, brief, and entertaining read. Very much in the vein of Pride, prejudice, and Zombies.
Max Balestra
Very funny, original and well researched. A breath of fresh air in the current zombie-mania.
Yoel ben Yehuda
Good. Would have been better had it not been fiction imitating non fiction imitating fiction...
Kenton Daniels
Great book. One day read. Zombies and Romans.
Jacqui Bailey
Short, but I liked it.
☯Bettie☯
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Karen Zieman
Karen Zieman marked it as to-read
Aug 21, 2014
Serena
Serena marked it as to-read
Aug 11, 2014
Christy
Christy marked it as to-read
Jul 24, 2014
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