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How the Greeks Built Cities: The Relationships of Architecture and Town Planning to Everyday....

3.7 of 5 stars 3.70  ·  rating details  ·  20 ratings  ·  3 reviews
Describes and analyzes the designs and rules of the shrines, temples, gymnasiums, agoras, fortifications, houses, and other structures of ancient Greek cities.
Paperback, 256 pages
Published July 1st 1976 by W. W. Norton & Company (first published January 1st 1967)
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Frank Stein


The book presents a side of the Greeks that I never learned from their histories or plays.

While they will probably always have a reputation as preternaturally rational and logical, the Greeks in building their cities were preeminently slap-dash and ad hoc. They did probably "invent" the gridded street system in the Western world, but decisions about where to place their temples, agoras, and stadium were always dependent on mere convenience and not comprehensive design.

Where do you put a theate
...more
Midori
The content of the book is simple but at the same time brilliant: even now, you rarely find this kind of general handbooks. The author describes each one of the main features of the Greek polis/city: acropolis, agora, temple, stoa, theatre, gymnasium, stadium, fountain house... they are all there. He explains them neatly though it seems that even in his abstract definitions, he has a specific acropolis, agora, temple etc. etc. in his mind. Athens looms large in his work- no wonder, he later wrot ...more
Charles
Oct 25, 2009 Charles marked it as to-read
The name of this book lent me to think about Landmarking: City, Church, & Jesuit Urban Strategy, which I read in college whilst in Mary Prevo Art History course. It makes too must sense that I read this, on top of the other books centered around Greek agriculture and basic farming.
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