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What Babies Say Before They Can Talk: The Nine Signals Infants Use to Express Their Feelings
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What Babies Say Before They Can Talk: The Nine Signals Infants Use to Express Their Feelings

3.71  ·  Rating Details ·  84 Ratings  ·  14 Reviews
How many times have you held your fussing or crying baby and thought, "Come on, please tell me what's going on with you!"
Well, your infant does tell you.
In What Babies Say Before They Can Talk, Paul C. Holinger, M.D., M.P.H., a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst who has been studying children and their emotions for more than twenty-five years, explains how infants communic
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ebook, 288 pages
Published September 1st 2009 by Touchstone (first published 2003)
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Desinka
Sep 10, 2015 Desinka rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A clear, simple and easy to read guide of how to read the signals of proverbial babies and how to act appropriately to create independent, happy children who've got self-esteem.
Rachel McCready-Flora
May 06, 2012 Rachel McCready-Flora rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Parents of babies 1-36 months; Anyone who enjoyed "Brain Rules for Babies" by John Medina
Shelves: baby-parenting
What Babies Say Before They Can Talk is a fantastic book about communicating with your baby. Admittedly, the title is a bit misleading. While Paul Holinger does spent the last third of the book reviewing nine facial cues that babies give to communicate - interest, enjoyment, surprise, distress, anger, fear, shame, disgust, and dissmell (a reaction to bad smells)- , the majority of this book is filled with excellent parenting advice, not only for babies, but for toddlers and even small children.

T
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Molly
Mar 24, 2011 Molly rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: parenthood
The word, "Obviously!" came to mind while reading much of this book. But. I might have been the choir he was preaching too, and I recognize a lot of the "bad parenting examples" in observing others. I also haven't had reason to discipline my ten-month-old just yet, but I know the time will come, and reading about how to deal with negative signals was helpful. I've also had a good model for positive parenting in my sister-in-law, whose sons (and, as of yesterday, daughter) are beautifully high oc ...more
Michelle
Jun 06, 2011 Michelle rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: baby
It's more of a guide to becoming a more self-aware parent. Less an "oh, he is complaining about the broccoli you fed him for lunch" type of book. It's great to read while your kid is still a baby, because these instinctive signals/responses evolve into emotions, and the book shows you how to acknowledge them and respond to them so that your child learns self-control and tension regulation (basically, healthy ways to express emotion so he's a stable, mature, happy individual). The book also reall ...more
Molly
Oct 03, 2016 Molly rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Read for Infant Mental Health class. While the book is interesting in that it identifies and explains the 9 different inborn signals baby have: interest, enjoyment, surprise, anger, fear, shame, disgust and dismell, it seemed to be a lot of information for the lay person. The parenting message is solid: recognizing, validating and supporting these emotions and experiences in their child helps the child develop a healthy self-concept, resiliency, and self-regulation skills. But there is an old sc ...more
Vanessa
Apr 25, 2014 Vanessa rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: teachers, mothers
Recommended to Vanessa by: pregnancy counselor
The title I misleading. This book in my opinion addresses children 3 and older versus infants. I was looking for information on communication before a child reaches the first year of life and found little of it in each chapter. The best point made relevant to me in this book was that infants communicate in order to survive. A crying baby is not doing so out of selfish reasons. It is not about you as a parent as much as it is about the child sensing an urgent need and calling for help. Responding ...more
Molly
Sep 24, 2009 Molly rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: parenting
Holinger -- a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst who specializes in infants and families -- articulates the nine signals infants have to communicate how they're feeling: surprise, interest, enjoyment, distress, anger, fear, shame, disgust (something doesn't taste good), and dissmell (something doesn't smell good). He explains how the signals manifest, what they mean, and how to respond to them. I found the book pragmatic and helpful and very baby-positive. I read almost his whole chapter on discipli ...more
Angie
Aug 02, 2010 Angie rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This book was totally amazing. It really made a ton of sense and gave me the tools I need to understand my baby, and actually all people. We're all the same and we all want to be loved and treated fairly, even little kids. It gave great points on how to discipline kids and how to not damage their self esteem. Loved this book!
Brenna
Oct 07, 2008 Brenna rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
I enjoyed this book and plan to incorporate it's ideas into my parenting.
Alvana
Mar 28, 2012 Alvana rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Somewhat repeatative and quite a bit more psychobabble than I usually prefer, but it does have some good points.
Shiri
Apr 17, 2014 Shiri rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: advice, parenting
Meh.
Richard
Oct 26, 2014 Richard rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: parenting
2nd parenting book I'd suggest.
Huda
read it but cant recall its idea now
Jess
Jess rated it really liked it
Nov 23, 2014
Julia Tsui
Julia Tsui rated it liked it
Aug 02, 2015
Tamara
Tamara rated it it was amazing
Mar 23, 2011
Christina
Christina rated it really liked it
Nov 12, 2007
Vicki
Vicki rated it liked it
Mar 01, 2014
Shannon
This one lost me by asserting that infants demonstrate shame. What do they have to be ashamed of?
Lyndsey
Lyndsey rated it liked it
Jun 07, 2010
Tara
Tara rated it really liked it
Dec 20, 2009
Mohamed Adel
Mohamed Adel rated it it was amazing
Aug 16, 2014
Sandra
Sandra rated it really liked it
Jul 11, 2012
whatsthatcrap
whatsthatcrap rated it really liked it
Apr 19, 2012
Kalli
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Dec 18, 2007
Sarah
Sarah rated it really liked it
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Betsy Thomas
Betsy Thomas rated it it was amazing
Jan 16, 2017
Victoria Mui
Victoria Mui rated it it was amazing
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