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The Church of England and Christian Antiquity: The Construction of a Confessional Identity in the 17th Century
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The Church of England and Christian Antiquity: The Construction of a Confessional Identity in the 17th Century

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Today, the statement that Anglicans are fond of the Fathers and keen on patristic studies looks like a platitude. Like many platitudes, it is much less obvious than one might think. Indeed, it has a long and complex history. Jean-Louis Quantin shows how, between the Reformation and the last years of the Restoration, the rationale behind the Church of England's reliance on ...more
Hardcover, 496 pages
Published April 1st 2009 by Oxford University Press, USA (first published 2009)
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William
Sep 02, 2014 William rated it it was amazing
An excellent and much needed overview of the place of the Church Fathers in the history of Anglican thought and theology. Quantin does much to dispel the view, especially common since the 19th Century, the Anglicanism was largely built on Patristic consensus.
Greg Coates
Greg Coates rated it liked it
Jan 18, 2016
Sam Schulman
Mar 08, 2011 Sam Schulman rated it liked it
Not as interesting as it promised to be.
D.N.
D.N. added it
Jan 29, 2011
Michelle
Michelle marked it as to-read
Apr 18, 2011
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