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Peter Pan (Peter Pan #3)

4.1  ·  Rating Details ·  182,580 Ratings  ·  6,441 Reviews
The boy who refuses to grow up teaches Wendy and her younger brothers how to fly. Then it's off to magical Neverneverland for adventures with mermaids, Indians, and wicked Captain Hook and his pirate crew in this illustrated, easy-reading adaptation of the classic fantasy.
Paperback, 185 pages
Published January 26th 1995 by Penguin Books, Limited (UK) (first published 1911)
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Miriam This book is available for free in several formats through The Gutenberg Project.

The Project Gutenberg EBook of Peter Pan, by James M. Barrie
This book is available for free in several formats through The Gutenberg Project.

The Project Gutenberg EBook of Peter Pan, by James M. Barrie
Mayshie May Peter pan also represents never growing up. Everlasting childhood.

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30)
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Apr 10, 2008 Janene rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: picture-book
This was such a treat! Three things: 1. It made me realize what a perfect Pan-type Peter I married, so many similarities, some that made me laugh out loud. 2. It made me want to look into my 4-yr-old's imaginitive eyes a little longer. 3. I also occasionally picked up my 20-month-old while sleeping just to rock and enjoy him for extra minutes.

This book just so fully captures childhood and the problem of growing up, in a witty way. If you've never read it, really you must! The edition we own is
Sep 06, 2008 Brad rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
I am not sure I can see why Peter Pan is such a beloved "classic." J.M. Barrie's story of the boy who wouldn't grow up just didn't reach me. And I read it aloud to 4 year old boy-girl twins.

Oh, they enjoyed it, and I may have bred a love for the story in them that will last (which could be exactly why the story has endured -- parental readings), but no matter how much they liked Peter Pan I could not see the appeal.

Wendy drove me crazy; Peter grew increasingly annoying; Hook bored me stiff; ther
Mar 28, 2009 Andrew rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: book-club, fantasy
I was surprised by this book in many good ways. I was expecting something that glorified the Child and its imagination, and perhaps cursed the unstoppable destruction of our Childinity. I was surprised to see this was not truly so. Barrie loves the Child, but he does not hide its foolishness, its selfishness, its ignorance. The Child in this is almost pre-moral. They have some understanding of villainy, but do not grasp the virtue of a hero. Barrie deems a key attribute to being a child as being ...more
Sep 24, 2008 Melissa rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
My children wanted to do our read aloud outside this evening. So we went on the patio and I began reading "Peter Pan." I read about how the mermaids would play with the bubbles, but when the children would come they would all disappear, but they would secretly watch. Pretty soon I hear over the fence our 11 year old neighbor boy say, "Is that Peter Pan?" "Yes," I say, "Would you like to come listen?" "I've been listening from here," he says. So I go on and read about Wendy's rule that all the bo ...more
Dec 22, 2008 Noelani rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This is my favorite book of all time. When you grow up with the "overly-nice" Disney version of the story, picking up this book for the first time can be quite a shock. The book will also shatter the image that most girls have of Tinkerbell but personally-I prefer the original. Johnny Corkscrew, Peter's idea of a kiss, sewing on a shadow, sifting through the thoughts of your children as they sleep... So many things about this book are missed by those who never bother to pick it up because they " ...more
Jan 13, 2009 Nikki rated it really liked it
I can't believe I've never actually read Peter Pan until now. I'd seen the Disney version, but this is both more charming and more sinister than that. There are lots of sweet little details, like mothers tidying up their children's thoughts, and the kiss on the corner of Mrs Darling's mouth.

But Peter is a monstrous sort of figure when you get past the romance of Neverland. He's a wild boy, selfish and cocky. Instead of being a kind of example of innocent childhood, he almost brings to mind the
K.D. Absolutely
Nov 06, 2010 K.D. Absolutely rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to K.D. by: 501 Must Read Books
Shelves: 501, childrens
A story of a dead child and a mother who is missing him.

Sir James Matthew Barrie (1860-1937), a Scottish, wrote this book in 1902 for an older brother, David (his mother's favorite) who died in an ice-skating accident the day before he turned 14. Thus, in his mother's mind, David always stayed as a young boy who would not grow up. J. M. Barrie, a middle-child and then only 6 years old, tried to assume David's place in his mother's heart by wearing the latter's clothes and speaking and sounding l
Erin ☕ *Proud Book Hoarder*

“I suppose it's like the ticking crocodile, isn't it? Time is chasing after all of us.”

Beautifully written, hauntingly nostalgic, and adventure filled, Peter Pan is not a story that can be forgotten and that has made itself live on in childhood literature since its conception.

So many are familiar with the Disney version, a book and movie which highlights the fun and joyful adventures of youth as they escape a bedroom window and fly in the night to a hidden world rich with adventures. The origin
All children, except one, grow up. They soon know that they will grow up, and the way Wendy knew was this. One day when she was two years old she was playing in a garden, and she plucked another flower and ran with it to her mother. I suppose she must have looked rather delightful, for Mrs Darling put her hand to her heart and cried, ‘Oh, why can’t you remain like this for ever!’ This was all that passed between them on the subject, but henceforth Wendy knew that she must grow up. You always kn ...more

Peter Pan is the classic tale of the boy who never grew up. In essence one could take this as a metaphor for immaturity, for there is certainly a difference between any man aging physically, mentally or emotionally. In my re-reading of this novel, I found that this theme stood out to me a lot more, along with several other, more sinister themes regarding parenthood and social acceptability. The overall message conveyed by Barrie appears to be one of conformity, not one of self discovery. Yet thi
Wendy Darling
Of course in the end, Wendy let them fly away together. Our last glimpse of her shows her at the window, watching them receding into the sky until they were as small as stars.

Reread in preparation for Neverland this coming weekend!
All children, except one, grow up.

Thus begins the most classic piece of children's literature of all-time. Written with such delicate embellishments the language is a wonder in itself, and you will find yourself sighing with delight at the stunning metaphors and fanciful explanations.
The story is naturally as immortal as Peter Pan himself, and every child should have the pleasure of taking off to Neverland along with him. Neverland is the perfect idealization of every child's imaginative dre
May 10, 2013 Steph rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Firstly, let me make it clear that there is actually more than one J M Barrie 'Peter Pan' story (something that I did not initially realise). There is 'Peter Pan and Wendy,' which is the story we are all familiar with (immortalised - inaccurately - by Disney); there is 'Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens,' which tells the story of him as a baby with the lost boys when he was originally abandoned, (which I have not yet read) and then 'The Little White Bird' (which I have not read either), but is a s ...more
Oct 25, 2014 Ariel rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition

Things that are great:
1) All of these tiny details that Barrie added in that just make everything feel really intricate.
2) Peter Pan is the most bizarre and interesting characters ever.
3) The whole concept of Neverland being fact of fiction? Fascinating.
4) The parents. WOAH SO INTERESTING.
5) I listened to an audiobook version while reading along which was read by Jim Dale and OMGSOGOOD.
6) The magic.
7) The pirates.
8) Understanding why Tinker Bell is called Tinker Bel
This edition of Peter Pan contains the text of J.M. Barrie’s 1911 novel, “Peter and Wendy”, which he wrote from his earlier play of 1904. The character of Peter Pan, the little boy who wouldn’t grow up, had already made an appearance in an earlier work by J.M. Barrie, “The Little White Bird” (1902). There continue to be many retellings of this magical story, and Peter is himself a timeless figure; one of the best-loved characters in children’s literature. There is maybe a little of Peter in ever ...more
Yaz *The Reading Girl*
Jan 01, 2014 Yaz *The Reading Girl* rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: EVERYBODY
"Dear Peter Pan,

What I would give to fly away with you! And to go to Neverland.

Love, Audrey"


"To die will be an awfully big adventure."

When you hear the name Peter Pan and Wendy, what does it remind you of? Happiness, childhood, innocence, flying away, love, and so much more right?

That's exactly what this book makes you feel. It is beautiful and magical.The writing is amazing and it is so easy to understand. It makes you feel like you are living in the book and you are either: the Lost Boy
I absolutely love the movie Finding Neverland and always felt a bit stupid for not having read the story that inspired it. Peter Pan turned out to be exactly what I thought it would be: A rich and extremely imaginary fairy tale with some surprisingly brutal scenes and questionable morals that definitely have to be seen within its time of creation.
--- read for the #5books7days challenge
Vane J.
Dec 12, 2015 Vane J. rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition

“All children, except one, grow up”

When I was a kid, I used to think Peter Pan was fantastic. He didn't grow and could do everything he wanted without parents scolding him. After some years I started to be more wary about him. I didn't like how reckless he was and how he lured little children out of their beds. That was my conception of him before starting this book. And indeed, he was a bit like that.

You see, the Disney movie isn't really that far from the original story. The difference is tha
Mar 25, 2015 Zoë rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Book 29/100
Scarlet Cameo
Apr 18, 2016 Scarlet Cameo rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: rc-16
English review at the bottom

Voy a decir algo que creo que la mayoría no dice: NO RECUERDO LA PELÍCULA ANIMADA, la única memoria que tengo de esa película es cuando Peter se asoma y de repente oscurecen su carahasta verse solo sus ojos y su sonrisa...para mi esa escena es muy tetrica. La película que yo recuerdo es la de 20o3, con personas reales actuando, Peter Pan rubio y un sexi Capitan Garfio. Esa historia, comparandola hoy con el libro es bastante fiel, es decir sólo quitan algunas cosas que
All these years I've travelled far away from the Peter Pan phenomenon, from Disney to the numerous movies inspired by the novel (the only thing I remember is that great attraction in Disneyland Paris where you're surrounded by stars and you fly in the Jolly Roger - but I think I digress). I still don't understand how I could have avoided such a masterpiece at school, or how nobody ever told me before to put down my cartoons and go read something that important.

Everything involved here is so bea
Aug 27, 2015 Jessica rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: theclassics, own
I read Peter Pan for the first time about five years ago, aloud to my kids. They couldn't follow it, I thought it was okay. It was a paperback with the movie tie-in cover. Then I saw this gorgeous, illustrated, three-dimensional version at Costco and thought, Ah, why not? The "Pan" movie is coming out, my kids love the Tinker Bell movies on Disney Channel, they might as well see what started it all.

I really loved this. There's something about having illustrations, and little quotes picked out f
Hailey (HailsHeartsNyc)
Read for school*

Really enjoyed this!!
Mark Lawrence
Mar 14, 2016 Mark Lawrence rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I read this to Celyn. It's a short book. Google tells me 47,000 words but it felt shorter than that.

Many of us know the story second hand through cartoons, Hollywood adaptations, and picture-books. The original item is not that dissimilar, though it's a fair bit more brutal that the cartoons and having been published in 1911 it's 100 years out of date when it comes to Native Americans!

The first thing to note is that it's not just the Never-Land that has a surreal, imaginary feel to it. The Darli
Not until I heard this song, Ruth B's Lost Boy did I realize how much I miss this story. Peter Pan was and is and will always be my most favorite fairytale of all time because I used to watch its cartoons, movie adaptations, and read the story books when I was little. It's such beautiful memory I have and I even dreamt of him as my boyfriend(well, I didn't know what "book boyfriend" was at that time) and waited for him to appear at my windowsill or sneak in my room at night. Just all kinds of sw ...more
Kate (GirlReading)
As someone who has only ever watched the movie versions of Peter Pan (mostly Disney), I was extremely intrigued to read and discover for myself the original story of Peter Pan. It was such an interesting read. There were so many similarities to the well loved story, I am already so familiar with and yet it felt very different. It was a lot darker and more sinister than the Disney story I've grown up with. Peter Pan was an unnerving character, as was the story itself. I feel as though I would hav ...more
Ana {The Good Gif Fairy}
3.5 *All the world is made of faith, and trust, and pixie dust* Stars

 photo f6ea5743d0668bfd82dfca3a6158b6f8_zpskugmnegm.jpg

This truly is an odd book. There were plenty of disturbing, surprising WTF moments. I made the stupid mistake of reading some Peter Pan theories that really creeped me out. Things I'm scared of- The Wizard of Oz movie, clowns, praying mantis, John Travolta. Now I can add Peter Pan to my list.

This book genuinely creeped me out. Yes there are bittersweet and endearing moments. The characters are compelling and well-developed.
“I’m youth, I’m joy, I’m a little bird that has broken out of the egg.”

J. M. Barrie lost his brother at the age of six. From then on, he dedicated his every day to trying to make his mother laugh and filling the gap her other son left her. This incident defined Barrie's psychology and provided the very fabric he used to write Peter Pan. However, to try to analyze this fairytale in terms of psychology would be to miss the pure magic that leaks from its pages, thus depriving yourself of the feel
Shawn (ThatOneEnglishGradStudent)
This book is really interesting from a literary angle, yet I was surprised how emotional and poignant it became at times, especially toward the end. It's one of the best examinations of childhood and youth and what it means to grow up that I think I've ever read. The way the narrator intrudes on the story and is just constantly present is sort of bizarre, but at a certain point I started to enjoy it and I think it adds a lot to the book's charm.

All that said, there are definitely a lot of layers
***Wanda’s Summer Carnival of Children’s Literature***

I remember my mother reading this aloud to my two younger sisters. I was fancying myself to be “too old” for such tales, but found myself doing something or other, close enough that I could listen in. I think it must have been a Disney-fied version of the tale, because there were several aspects to the story which startled me this time around.

I was surprised at how shark-like Peter actually was, both in his toothiness and his lurking, waiting
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Sir James Matthew Barrie, 1st Baronet, OM (9 May 1860 – 19 June 1937) was a Scottish author and dramatist, best remembered today as the creator of Peter Pan.

The child of a family of small-town weavers, he was educated in Scotland. He moved to London, where he developed a career as a novelist and playwright. There he met the Llewelyn Davies boys who inspired him in writing about a baby boy who has
More about J.M. Barrie...

Other Books in the Series

Peter Pan (3 books)
  • Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens
  • The Little White Bird

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“To die will be an awfully big adventure.” 15858 likes
“All the world is made of faith, and trust, and pixie dust.” 8139 likes
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