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Jubal Sackett (The Sacketts #4)

4.11 of 5 stars 4.11  ·  rating details  ·  3,784 ratings  ·  130 reviews
Jubal Sackett, narrator, ventures west into grassy plains on request of Natchez Indian priest for party led by princess Itchakomi. She will rule her people when their aging chief dies, after vanquishing rival, arrogant warrior Kapata. Jubal will fight beside a woman as brave, strong, smart, and fast with weapons as he is.
Paperback, 368 pages
Published May 1st 1986 by Bantam Books (first published May 1985)
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Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtryRiders of the Purple Sage by Zane GreyThe Sisters Brothers by Patrick deWittJubal Sackett by Louis L'AmourThe Sacketts Box 5 vols by Louis L'Amour
My 10 Favorite Westerns
4th out of 79 books — 22 voters
Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtryTrue Grit by Charles PortisBlood Meridian, or the Evening Redness in the West by Cormac McCarthyBury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee BrownNo Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy
Best Westerns
149th out of 548 books — 726 voters


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Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
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Kate Roman

So it was that in the last hour of darkness I went down the mountain through the laurel sticks, crossed a small stream, and skirted a meadow to come to the trace I sought.

Nearly one hundred years before De Soto had come this way, his marchings and his cruelties leaving no more mark than the stirring of leaves as he passed. A few old Indians had vague recollections of De Soto, but they merely shrugged at our questions. We who wandered this land knew this was no "new world". The term was merely a
...more
JBradford
I stopped in at the VA Medical Center a couple days ago to update my prescriptions and looked over the collection of pocketbooks on the swap table in the waiting room while waiting to be processed, and I found a bunch of paperback books by Louis L’Amour. They were old pocketbooks, which is only natural, because I have been reading Louis L’Amour’s novels since I was a teenager. I grabbed one that I did not recognize as having read before, with a reason for taking it mostly being because of the pi ...more
Stan Crowe
I have to say that this one really surprised me. I've never been a L'Amour fan, to be honest (though my mom's dad had read, I think, every last one of his novels), but I think I could get into L'Amour easily if I tried.

Normally, I wouldn't have enjoyed a book written like this: there was a high level of repetition, some plot resolutions that seemed just a bit too easy (and that were, by and large, foregone conclusions), and some bald foreshadowing that could easily have killed off any suspense b
...more
Laudys
My aunt found this book at an airport and gave it to me. I put off reading it for so long, 'cause I don't really read western. I just don't find the genre that appealing... but this book. This book.

I've read it more times that should be allowed to. It's one of my default fall-to book. I just grab it if there's a prospect of me getting stuck in a waiting room and I proceed to devour it every time (and yes, I may have developed a crush on Jubal Sackett along the way).

The plot is just stuff happeni
...more
Sherrie
*spoilers*
this was my first louis l'amour book. i thought it was good and interesting to read about this time period of american history. my only complaint is that most of the book was jubal watching for enemies, "there was movement! it's an indian!" etc. that got kind of boring. also i was really intrigued by the mummies he found in the cave and the "find them" plot. then at the end, he totally leaves that plot hanging. that was a huge bummer. oh well. but i enjoyed reading it. not sure if i'll
...more
Cade
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
s
Sep 13, 2010 s added it
So I didn't have to actually read the end of some sentences as I could predict what they were going to say. When it comes down to it, you just have to pick up a Louis L'Amour every now and then. The best part of this book - the inscription - it was a Father's Day gift to my Dad in '84 or '86 (hardback even) from my sister when she only had two kids.
Lorraine
I have read many Louis L'Amour books, but this is the one I remember the most. This was an exciting story that I read many years ago and enjoyed very much. Jubal Sackett left his family home to explore America. I can't remember exactly where he went, but he saw buffalo in great herds and saw Niagara Falls and (I think) the Grand Canyon.
Caleb Hettinga
Caleb Hettinga
11/29/13
Mrs. Johnson-Per.1
Book Review #2

1.) Introduction: This novel is titled Jubal Sackett, and was written by Louis L’amour. Bantam Books, Inc published this book in 1985. This book is an adventurous survival story that involves Indians, fighting, survival, and love.

2.) Brief Summary: The story starts out with Jubal Sackett, an English-blooded, American-born late teen alone in the woods of the Appalates Mountains. He is exploring the east coast out of curiosity, surviving off th
...more
Kate Sherrod
Each of Louis L'Amour's Sackett novels becomes my new favorite as I read along, but I'm starting to see a bit of a pattern forming of which I might tire. That pattern being that each novel is, in no small part, about its chosen Sackett's quest for a wife with whom to make more Sacketts to be waiting there to greet the rest of the white folks when they finally get around to settling the interior of the North American continent.

So far, though, there is plenty of variety within that narrative, and
...more
Stan
I have to say that this one really surprised me. I've never been a L'Amour fan, to be honest (though my mom's dad had read, I think, every last one of his novels), but I think I could get into L'Amour easily if I tried.

Normally, I wouldn't have enjoyed a book written like this: there was a high level of repetition, some plot resolutions that seemed just a bit too easy (and that were, by and large, foregone conclusions), and some bald foreshadowing that could easily have killed off any suspense b
...more
Mike (the Paladin)
I got this audio version of the book from the library recently to listen to when I was busy with mindless tasks...or just wanted something on when I was "relaxing". I read it many years ago and recalled it as I listened. On the whole I like Louis L'Amour and this is an early title(in the story's time line) of his most "iconic" fictional family the Sacketts.

I've read several reviews of the L'Amour books here and one thing I've seen criticized in them (though not "real" often) is his treatment of
...more
Mary
The exposition of “Jubal Sackett” by Louis L’amour starts you on the journey with Jubal Sackett, a yeoman, who is heading westward. You learn he is being followed by someone or something which you later you find out the identity of. In this first chapter or so you get to know who Jubal Sackett really is, and some of his family back ground. He talks about his father, his mother and brothers and sister, how they are in England and how his father is here in the Americas but he has left him behind. ...more
Alana Sholar
What can I say I understand and appreciate all of Louis L'Amour writing. I own everything he ever wrote most of which are leather bound covers. I started collecting his work at the age of 18 and was sent the last few things he wrote after he passed.

Louis L'Amour was a great story teller -- I can always picture each place, taste the food, and feel the pain as I read his words. Louis L'Amour books have been turned into movies, and enjoyed by many.

Stars such as Tom Selleck and Sam Elliott just to n
...more
Ryan Mishap
My dad loves all his books and I read over a hundred while staving off the night terrors when growing up.

It is a strange fact about the old west, Indians, and the genocidal take over of the land now called the United States that fiction writing about them is often taken for truth (see Ward Churchill's Fantasies of the Master Race). The back of almost every L'amour novel lauds his knowledge of "how it really was" and the fact that he could've been one of the tough, honorable, lonely fighting men
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Carl Brush
You can’t beat Louis L’Amour. Phony as much of his prose is (Greener the grass will grow than in the land we left behind.), he keeps pulling you into the story. Or at least he keeps pulling me. Within the first fifty pages, his hero breaks his leg while alone in the forest, begins starving, is mauled by a panther. Surely you want to see how he gets of that one.
Then there’s the buffalo Jubal Sackett breaks to the saddle and trains not to eat his corn. Then there’s an (almost) plausible battle wit
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Jason
My march through Sackett history continues with the fourth volume in the series, this one featuring the title character, who's one of the sons of Sackett patriarch Barnabas, and the first to head into the wild, unexplored American West.

This book will likely be of interest to anyone curious about the Sackett saga, and though I didn't find it to be ultra exciting, it's nonetheless solid—sort of like the Sacketts themselves. This book is longer than most of L'Amour's, making it of average novel len
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Denise
I can see why the men in my family enjoyed the writing of L'Amour. First one I've read. The history was interesting, with enough action, plot, romance, and moral characters that you cared about to keep reading. I found the spelling of the Indian names interesting, and the way the tribes made alliances, merged, learned about horses. Quick, fun read.
Vali
This is the last L'amour novel I read out of about a dozen, because it was the longest. I must say I was pleasantly surprised. It was recognizably a L'amour novel, but a lot more as well. Set in the 1620's, it's about a pioneering mountain man exploring unknown territory west of Appalachia. Perhaps L'amour had grown in his writing, or perhaps in 1986 he had more leeway in his writing than he did in his cowboy novels of the 50s. In Jubal he offers superstition and sixth sense. He explores the the ...more
Craig
The fourth book in the Sackett series by L'Amour. This book focuses on Jubal Sackett, the 3rd son of Barnabas Sackett and the action takes place around 1630. Jubal (like his father) is a wanderer whose greatest desire is to seek and know the new lands to the American West. His travels with an Indian (a Kickapoo warrior) take him from the Carolinas west up the Tennessee and Ohio rivers into the Mississippi and from there to the western Rocky Mountains. Along the way, they encounter many Indian tr ...more
Keilani
Louis Lamour is always an author that I take in spurts. I read a bunch of his books at once, and then not again for a long time. I like his thicker books because they involve more plot and more history. I like that his books are very accurate, if he talks about a lake or mountain range, it's there in the spot he describes and it's like he describes. Especially impressive since he did all the research without the help of the internet.

This one just gives a little further history of the Sackett fam
...more
Keilani Ludlow
Louis Lamour is always an author that I take in spurts. I read a bunch of his books at once, and then not again for a long time. I like his thicker books because they involve more plot and more history. I like that his books are very accurate, if he talks about a lake or mountain range, it's there in the spot he describes and it's like he describes. Especially impressive since he did all the research without the help of the internet.

This one just gives a little further history of the Sackett fam
...more
J. Aleksandr Wootton
This is the only Louis L'Amour book I read twice. Jubal is perhaps the most all-around likeable member of the Sackett clan, and his story is one of L'Amour's only real epics.
Jacob Hardin
Jubal Sackett is the fourth book in the "Sackett" series. Set in the Western times, Jubal Sackett migrates to the western United States to explore. There, he undergoes a mission to find a Natchez exploration party to find their leader and deliver a message.

Jubal is a very successful man. He has money, and he enjoys the finer things in life. However, he knows how to fight, and he shows that skill multiple times.

This book was interesting. I would not recommend it to other readers, though, unless t
...more
Danzi
Jubal was an inspiring character. He had a dream to go west and discover new land and he followed it. I loved the story of Jubal Sackett! I highly recommend this book.
Jeff
Took me back to my days reading Edgar Rice Burroughs. Stylistically weak, often predictable, but historically interesting.
Carmelina
Louis L'Amour's writing is sparse yet with a few words portrays the beauty of the land Jubal is travelling through, the danger of travelling in new lands, the fight to survive in this untamed land and of friendship and love.

Jubal's friendship with Keokotah, kindred spirit in his desire to go where few men have been. His growing love for Itchakomi and hers for him. I found myself chuckling a few times at Jubal's lack of understanding why Itchakomi's anger with him at times as he totally fails to
...more
Michael Cordova
Mar 08, 2014 Michael Cordova rated it 5 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: western lovers
Recommended to Michael by: My Dad
Shelves: western
My favorite of Louis Lamour's 17 book Sackett series. I have read it twice and will continue reading it forever.
Laura
I liked Jubal a lot from the brief appearances he'd made in earlier books. He never talked much and was this odd, enigmatic character on the fringes of things. Suddenly getting a whole book narrated from his point of view changed things around. He ended up being a lot more like the rest of his family than previous impressions had indicated, which made him slightly less original. However, one can't be too disappointed in a man who can kill a mountain lion with a knife while his leg is broken and ...more
Linda Hali
OK - this is sort of odd- but I have just fisihed my 3rd L'Amour Sackett family novel. Not great, but weirdly addictive, and significant as a genre and document of american history by a pioneer descended and well traveled author. They were shipped to me by mistake and the company told me to donate... thought I would read a few first. So American civ from early colonization and westward expansion is pretty interesting, and these are sort of gentlemanly romatic and very clean cut. My cowboy boot w ...more
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858
Louis L'Amour was an American author. L'Amour's books, primarily Western fiction, remain enormously popular, and most have gone through multiple printings. At the time of his death all 101 of his works were in print (86 novels, 14 short-story collections and one full-length work of nonfiction) and he was considered "one of the world's most popular writers".
-Wikipedia
More about Louis L'Amour...
Last of the Breed The Walking Drum Hondo Sackett's Land (The Sacketts, #1) The Lonesome Gods

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“It is not enough to do, one must also become. I wish to be wiser, stronger, better. This--" I held out my hands "--this thing that is me is incomplete. It is only the raw material with which I have to work. I want to make it better than I received it.” 7 likes
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