Me to We: Finding Meaning in a Material World
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating

Me to We: Finding Meaning in a Material World

4.02 of 5 stars 4.02  ·  rating details  ·  356 ratings  ·  66 reviews
Imagine waking up every morning believing that your actions can make a significant change in the world.

For everyone who has ever yearned for a better life and a better world, Craig and Marc Kielburger share a blueprint for personal and social change that has the power to transform lives one act at a time. Through inspirational contributions from people from all walks of...more
ebook, 320 pages
Published March 25th 2008 by Touchstone (first published 2006)
more details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Me to We, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Me to We

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 829)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  rating details
Marsha Baker
Absolutely phenomenal! I am making sure all of my friends read this book. It is truly inspiring and will transform the way you see the world and your role in it.
Chelsey
My oh my! This book is the definition of inspiration. You know how people say that they have read a book that is “life changing”?? Well… this one literally life changing:D

Me to We is a non-fiction book written by the Kielburger brothers. Craig and Marc Kielburger are the founders and heads of many charities, including Free the Children and Me to We.

Essentially this book talks about how you can change your attitude and actions from a “me” mentality – that is living your life for you and you alon...more
Arlene

"Imagine waking up every morning believing that your actions can make a significant change in the world."

Mothers and fathers have been saying it to selfish children for generations: "The world doesn't revolve around you."

And yet, it does.

Craig and Marc Kielburger learned at a young age something that takes most of us decades to learn: the world revolves around us only in that it needs us to make it the best it can be. And, in a happy twist of fate, when we forget about ourselves and build a life...more
Susan
From Me to We: An inspirational guidance for self-help and how to give back locally and globally.

Authored by the highly acclaimed Kielburger brothers, who initiated the anti-child labour charity, there are inspirational stories from Archbishop Desmond Tutu to Oprah Winfrey to Queen Noor on how to reach out to those less fortunate and valuable lessons to learn along the way.

It advocates a giving philosophy, offers new ways to determine happiness and find meaning in our lives. The Western culture...more
CD
Excellent book for teens and parents and any adult who works with teens. Provides a concrete and positive way for our teens to make a positive difference in the world. It is trly amazing what teens can do right now. There is no need for them to wait until they are adults to do something spectacular. This book is filled with personal stories of teens who have raised buckets of cash, who have helped other teens in need, who have made a difference for child laborers, the list goes on and one. This...more
Erin
Overall this book is not what I expected it to be. I think that the actual Me to We Philosophy could have been expressed quite well in an article or essay format.

I really liked a lot of the content within the book. The personal essays were great, the stories of the people in various countries and conditions were inspiring. The statistics, history, and background information on some of the countries was inforative and intersting. The resource list and various sections of the book are great educai...more
Jenn
If you want to change your life and turn it around for the better, this is the book. This will completely change your perspective on life. I am recommending this book to many people and forcing both my parents to read it (hehe). This book has changed me and how I see the world and the people in it. This books has inspired me as well. I recently went on a Me 2 We trip to the Amazon rainforest in Ecuador and after returning to Canada I have constantly compared the lives of people in the developed...more
Michelle
Aug 06, 2008 Michelle rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: everyone
This is a very inspiring book & I'm shocked more people haven't read it! I'm only on chapter 4 so I feel I should finish it before I review it. I have to read it in small doses because it is very emotional for me. It's true that if I wasn't interested in focusing on my life and what my own goals are, than this would not be as meaningful. However I think I would recommend that everyone read this book.
Betty
Reading this book is hard because every page at the beginning made me want to cry. Eventually I skipped ahead of the personal story's and got to some other stuff with was less emotionally heart wrenching.

"Research had shown that feeling like we belong, are accepted and valued by at least some other people, is essential to our well-being. Satisfying this need takes more than just frequent contact with other people: it involves creating a sense of connection through deep meaningful relationships."...more
Daniel Currie
Altho I think the authors of this book have done and are doing some wonderful work wherever they go, I'm not sure this sorta manual on how to adopt their philosophy translates into a fun read and I'm not sure it is supposed to.

There are a ton of suggestions on things you can do and dozens of testimonials and anecdotes meant to inspire you to action to their 'Me to We' philosophy. I don't doubt a one of them, but as a book it becomes somewhat repetitive. Even the best intentions wear thin after...more
Rebecca Duncan
The past couple of years I've found myself focused more on "me and mine," with most of my attention and work centered around my own home and family - and with a toddler and a baby, that may be excusable, but it's not how I intend to live or how I want my children to prioritize their involvement with the world. This book was motivational in that it praised the small and simple things we can do for others, given the limitations on time and resources that most of us have. Yes, it's self-helpy, but...more
Jennifer
I liked it, but more so in the beginning then towards the end. But that's quite common isn't it... The first few chapters were moving, but then it sort of reads like a commercial for their charity: promising fulfillment in life through the selfish gratification one gets by extending a hand. Which is a good selfish feeling, as it actually does good at the same time. But you do not strive to help others because you want to find meaning in an empty life, or because you long to be a "role-model". It...more
Allie
Gosh, how long have I been reading this book? A century maybe?
No, but with school going on and me now being in AP English, reading for my own enjoyment has gone out the window. Poof! Adios!

I absolutely love this book though! Seriously, if you have a passion for giving back or are interested in ways you CAN give back, read this. It's really interesting and inspiring. So many "I" words! The brothers who wrote it have led a very cool life and I hope we cross paths someday. :)
Marianne
Aug 11, 2010 Marianne rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Tracy, Jen, Erin
Recommended to Marianne by: Craig Keilburger
Shelves: peace-jam
A soft read that is an excellent choice to fill a few minutes at a time. Although slow to grab my attention, the carefully chosen anecdotes by many famous names begin to convince you that a change in viewpoint is possible and necessary. I didn't enjoy the writng style as it was too simplistic, but I began to be captivated and compelled to complete the selections and found myself meditation on the ideas. The ideas are very powerful
Anna
No this is not a marriage book. And yes I would recommend it to everyone. Especially if you have grown up in a sheltered world where you like to not think about what happens to those less fortunate than you on the other side of the world. This book honestly opened my eyes and gave me hope that I can make a difference. It really was probably my favorite book I have read this summer.
Gordon
One of my TBR 2009 books (yay!), some positive non-fiction to counter all the doom and gloom that usually overshadows the genre, or at least my picks. The Kielburgers challenge readers to move from a self-interested viewpoint towards one that benefits us all, hence Me to We. Craig Kielburger is about 25 and has three Nobel Peace Prize noms, so I'd say he knows his shit.
Terri
The writing in this book wouldn't win a Pulitzer -- it's not bad, just very simple. And I often felt while reading that I was in the middle of the target audience; I'm not an adolescent, and not someone with a family. That said, there is a lot to take from the stories told in this book. It'd be a great starting point to activism for a young person.
Jill
Mar 31, 2008 Jill rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: teenagers & burnt out corporate professionals
Recommended to Jill by: Ryan
Shelves: nonfiction
I liked it, but I was trying to be critical without being negative. There are some questions that I had, but overall it was a good reminder to keep on doing what I've been doing. I may base a sermon on this book - I definitely got some ideas of projects that I want to start in the community... now that I'm leaving. I'll put a better review up in a while.
Shawna
The best part of this book is the personal stories. The rest of it is just the concepts of charity and selflessness dressed up in a non-religious presentation. Having said that, both times I have read this book I have been prompted to connect and help someone in a meaningful way, so I guess it was worth it.
Akhila
I felt like this book was very elementary. It had a great message and the authors are very inspiring, but it seemed like it was written for little kids. While the theme was good, I felt like it didn't really add very much to my life in terms of my understanding of the world.
Tanya
An amazing message from two amazing young men. However, I recommend travelling to see them speak, more than reading the book. I was a little disappointed about the amount of American references in the book. However, the message is what is important...
Turki
Thank you authors.
It is a great book to think in a different way not as usual we think. Thinking about others, how they suffer from such an life experience for example, is a great step heading the appropriate Me to We philosophy.

Thanks again!
Sally
Two brothers who began working for social causes in their teens inspire readers to take simple, doable steps to begin making a difference in their family, community, nation, and world. A very worthwhile book, and good for teens also.
Ali Mae
a little cheesy, but no too depressing--although the subject matter is very depressing. I listened to the audio book while driving--so I couldn't do the act now stuff--but I thought there were really good ideas in there.
Katherine Barrus
I loved the world view of this book and its efforts to make the reader think about her place in the world at large. It made me want to get out and serve and offered very concrete examples of ways that could be done.
Julie
Any book that encourages thoughtfulness and less consumption is welcome. Quick read, the book includes some exercises to do (not the book's strongest element) Encourages small acts and talks about collective change.
El50
I have really enjoyed reading this book. It has given me lots to think about with interesting stories and ideas. It is a great motivational book that makes me want to do more with my time and resources.
Laurie Jacob-toews
I enjoyed this book, but was disappointed that they chose to focus on American examples and statistics. I expected that they would have chosen a Canadian focus... since they are Canadian.
Trace Henley
I think this is an incredible book. It really outlines the difference one person can make by believing in something. More importantly, it offers the opportunity for personal reflection.
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 27 28 next »
topics  posts  views  last activity   
Just join in, it's a great book! 1 6 Mar 14, 2010 10:59AM  
  • Field Notes on the Compassionate Life: A Search for the Soul of Kindness
  • Style Statement: Live By Your Own Design
  • The End of Food: How the Food Industry Is Destroying Our Food Supply--And What You Can Do about It
  • MotherStyles: Using Personality Type to Discover Your Parenting Strengths
  • Boo!
  • The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Volume B: 1820-1865
  • Young Mandela: The Revolutionary Years
  • Social Entrepreneurship: What Everyone Needs to Know
  • Rick Mercer Report: The Book
  • The Family Dinner: Great Ways to Connect with Your Kids, One Meal at a Time
  • Three Wishes: Palestinian and Israeli Children Speak
  • The 12 Secrets of Highly Creative Women
  • Changing Minds: The Art And Science of Changing Our Own And Other People's Minds
  • What We Ache For: Creativity and the Unfolding of Your Soul
  • Race Against Time: Searching for Hope in AIDS-Ravaged Africa
  • Have a New Husband by Friday
  • The Whuffie Factor: The 5 Keys for Maxing Social Capital and Winning with Online Communities
  • If the World Were a Village: A Book about the World's People
Craig Kielburger is a Canadian activist for the rights of children. As a 12 year old he founded Free the Children, a non-profit organisation that now operates in 45 countries with more than one million young people involved in programs. More recently, Craig co-founded Me to We with his brother Marc. Me to We is a for-profit social enterprise that provides socially responsible products and services...more
More about Craig Kielburger...
Free the Children: A Young Man Fights Against Child Labor and Proves that Children Can Change the World Free the Children The World Needs Your Kid: Raising Children Who Care And Contribute My Grandma Follows Me on Twitter: And Other First World Problems We're Lucky to Have Living Me to We: The Guide for Socially Conscious Canadians

Share This Book