Benny and Penny in the Toy Breaker
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating

Benny and Penny in the Toy Breaker (Benny and Penny)

3.47 of 5 stars 3.47  ·  rating details  ·  135 ratings  ·  29 reviews
“The combination of picture book and comic book make this an excellent transition book for…early readers” – Graphic Novel Reporter

In their third adventure, Benny and Penny hide every toy and tell Cousin Bo he can’t play with them. Will the three mice find a way to play without something getting torn, ripped, or snatched away?

Bestselling author Geoffrey Hayes returns to thr...more
Hardcover, 32 pages
Published April 1st 2010 by Toon Books (first published 2010)
more details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Benny and Penny in the Toy Breaker, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Benny and Penny in the Toy Breaker

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 209)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  rating details
Peggy Dynek
1. The Benny and Penny books are a series developed at reaching young readers. The use of bold print emphasizes the important points, and the expressions of the characters really help the student who is not a confident reader to comprehend the meaning of the story. I think this series/story would be quite an asset for the charm of the pictures, and the caring and positive resolution. The pictures would make this enjoyable for a child so young they are not yet reading, so would be quite a transit...more
Kara Dean
Much as I loved "Danny the Dinosaur", I sure wish the Toon Books had been around when I was learning to read. Engaging and concerned about the things kids care about (toys, stinky monsters, favorite colors,)they are as fun as they are attractive. The books incorporate proper comic formatting with the controlled vocabulary associated with easy reader, to create a reading experience that is kid friendly, level appropriate--everything one could want from a book designed to snag fans.

In this install...more
Nicola Mansfield
Reason for Reading: My son read aloud to me as his reader.

Summary: Benny and Penny have just got everything all prepared to play pirate treasure map when their mom announces that cousin Bo has arrived to play. Cousin Bo wrecks everything so Benny and Penny quickly hide all the toys they can see, including their newly made treasure map. At first B & P don't want to play with Bo, then Bo finds a few toys, breaking them, then he finds the map and takes off with it and a chase pursues with every...more
Aknipfel
Benny and Penny and the Toy Breaker is a Toon Book by Geoffrey Hayes. This is a great introduction to graphic novels for young children. One way I would incorporate this into my classroom is maybe let it be a fun book for the children’s free time. If they wanted to read this book aloud they could. They could read it with two other children and then each student would play as a character reading when it was his or her turn. This book shows the importance of sharing and caring. However, I do wish...more
Rebecca Ferguson
Text to text- There are three mice and one is picking on the the other two but really he just wants to play along. You can see throughout the text the one mice is trying to get attention from the other two by being mean
Text to self- I can relate back to this and having to play with other children. We may not always want to play with the bullies but it is good to get along. Sometimes kids cry for attention in different ways.
Text to world- Children can learn from the one mice who is mean at first...more
Erin Reilly-Sanders
The art is cute and the story okay, but nothing spectacular except for the overblown emotiveness of the characters which combines to make this a fun little easy reader type book.
John
I'm a huge fan of the TOON BOOKS series.
David
Benny and Penny in the Toy Breaker by Geoffrey Hayes tells of cousin Bo who is known as a toy breaker. Benny and Penny don't want have their toys broken so they try to hide them. Bo plays rough, takes a map away, and breaks Penny's monkey. Trying to find someone else to play with, Bo gets stuck in a hole in the fence. Will be get left there and will the cousins make up?

Hayes' illustrations show some exaggerated, emotional expressions in this title. There is a bit of pain shown in the guise of ph...more
Jean Coughlin
1. This book would be a “next step” book for teaching how to read graphic novels. There are several bubbles in a frame and students have to figure out whether to read them left to right or top bubble to bottom bubble. There were a couple times I miss-read them.
2. This would be a great book to use with pre-school – 2 for a theme on friendship, how to be a friend, or bullying.
3. (2010, July 1). School Library Journal. http://titlewave.com/search?SID=1bb4a...
Brett Axel
Two youthful rodent characters, Benny and Penny exclude a third (Bo) in play because he has broken their toys in the past, but they don't explain themselves, they just treat him poorly. He responds by snatching one of their things and, when they demand it back taunts, "Oh! Are you going to tell your mommy?"

A series of circumstances has them playing together at the end but there is no reconciliation and no aknowledgement at all that the behavior was bad on either side.

The eye to detail is no bett...more
Dolly
Mar 12, 2011 Dolly rated it 3 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: children starting to read graphic novels
We've read three of the stories (all of them written so far) in the Benny and Penny series and our girls really like them. I don't enjoy reading graphic novels aloud very much, but our girls don't seem to mind. We had fun reading this aloud, with different children taking parts and reading the dialogue for their chosen character. I didn't know that it involved a cousin and it was a nice coincidence that we happened to be visiting my husband's sister and her children this weekend. We included our...more
Laura
A great introduction to graphic novels for emergent readers. Benny and Penny are searching for pirates' loot. Bo, their toy-breaking cousin shows up and a sweet and funny disagreement ensues. One of the things I liked best about the story was the realistic ending: Bo, Penny, and Benny decide to play games without things that can get broken.

Initially, I felt like the story had a bit of a dated feel. The colors are somewhat muted and the kids don't have any electronic toys. But after a careful re...more
Charolette
The illustrations and facial expressions in this graphic novel are great. The illustrator captured the expressions without the need for words. The story line is good but I think it is lacking. Penny and Benny knew Bo breaks things but they never gave him an opportunity to play with them. I think all of them learnt a lesson at the end of the book. However, I was not impressed with the book. I think the author could have done better with getting the point accross that you need to share toys and pl...more
Melanie
Benny and Penny are happily playing treasure map when they learn that their cousin, Bo, is coming over. They quickly hide their toys because Bo is not as gentle with belongings as he should be. When Bo arrives, he immediately begins to boss everyone around and mistreat the toys.

When Bo gets himself stuck in the fence he won't admit he needs help until a porcupine shoves him out. Then he develops a little humility and apologizes for his behavior.
midnightfaerie
We use these books as our daily read out loud selections occasionally. My 5 yr old son absolutely loves Benny and Penny and immediately begged for more as well as more Geoffrey Hayes as soon as he was finished. It reads like a comic book, with fun cartoonish pictures and the dialogue in bubbles above the characters heads. Still worth the vocabulary learning alone, as the kids all seem to love it. Highly recommended.
Margaret Dilloway
I find I like reading graphic novels aloud, because I don't have to bother with, "So and so replied" and "Ms X exclaimed." I mean, if the picture book is well-written it's fine, but often it just seems to make the book longer. This way, I just do different voices for the characters and point to who's saying what, and my kid follows along. Now I feel terribly lazy.
Justyn Rampa
I found this book to be slightly better than Benny and Penny Play Pretend although there was another unlikeable character in this in the form of Cousin Bo who is the toy breaker of the title. There is conflict and appropriate resolution. By the end, everyone learns a lesson and apparently there is an interactive element online that I have yet to explore.
Beth
Benny has a map to find loot. Bo is known for breaking toys. They don't want to play with Bo, so he goes to find new friends. They help Bo get out of the fence. They learn to play together without toys.

The website does offer lots of fun for kids and plans for teachers as well:
http://toon-books.com/
Sarah
Benny and Penny must hide their toys before Bo comes. Bo always breaks their toys. But after he arrives, will Benny, Penny, and Bo be able to play together without and toys. A good graphic novel for younger children and it shows the importance of sharing.
Lionel
A Toon Book. Like Pixar, Toon Books are consistently good; you can't go wrong no matter which one you pick. This is the third Benny and Penny book, following Just Pretend and The Big No No, though they're each stand alone stories.
Ms. B
Do Benny and Penny have to play with their cousin Bo who is a toy breaker? Is Bo really as mean as her seems or is he lonely and not sure how to make friends?
Angie
The little animals are cute.

Will have to see what the kids think of this. Do they recognize the friend that always breaks things?
Kelsey Bates
Great beginning reader that's a graphic novel. Panel layout is both easy and complex.
Barb Keister
Another Toon Reader that I'm sure my 2nd graders will be passing around the room!
Jeanne
Mar 23, 2010 Jeanne added it
Shelves: to-gift
WP review: Benny and Penny in the Big No-No -- 2010 Geisel Award from ALA
Erin
Illustrations were cute, but the whole thing was mehhhh.
Niki (Daydream Reader)
I think this could be a fun series for younger students.
PWRL
Jun 13, 2013 PWRL marked it as to-read
Shelves: 2013-new
E
Kristine Pratt
Kristine Pratt marked it as to-read
Sep 12, 2014
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
10658
Geoffrey Hayes has written and illustrated over forty children’s books, including the extremely popular series of early readers Otto and Uncle Tooth, the classic Bear By Himself, and When the Wind Blew by Caldecott Medal-winning author Margaret Wise Brown.
More about Geoffrey Hayes...
Benny and Penny in The Big No-No! Benny and Penny in Just Pretend Benny and Penny in Lights Out Patrick in A Teddy Bear's Picnic and Other Stories A Poor Excuse for a Dragon

Share This Book