Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Really, Really Big Questions” as Want to Read:
Really, Really Big Questions
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Really, Really Big Questions

4.19 of 5 stars 4.19  ·  rating details  ·  42 ratings  ·  8 reviews
Really, Really Big Questions by Stephen Law

Have you ever looked at your dog and wondered what it is really thinking? Or asked yourself if your entire life has been a dream? Prepare to exercise your mind as you investigate these big ideas and more on the roller-coaster ride of reason and ridiculous that is philosophy. Cool illustrations, brainteasers, and quirky quotations
...more
Hardcover, 64 pages
Published October 13th 2009 by Kingfisher (first published 2009)
more details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Really, Really Big Questions, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Really, Really Big Questions

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 90)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  rating details
paula
I would like to organize my thoughts about this book. To do it justice. Because the book is certainly well-organized. It takes major philosophical questions - both the eternal ones, like "How can I tell right from wrong?" and the excruciatingly current ones, like "Did someone design the universe?" - breaks them down gently and uses accessible, often amusing analogies to go about finding the answers.

Many questions are left unanswered. Most, even, I'd say.

"How can we decide who is right about eat
...more
Betsy
One Sentence Review: A perfect addition to any philosophical section of a library, and not a bad starting point for kids who wonder everything from "What happens when I die?" to "Are humans basically good or evil?"
Jill Pickle
These aren't just questions that philosophy majors in college sit around asking. You ask them, too. And since there are no "right" answers, anyone can think about them and formulate their own opinions. Some of these questions might be important to you; some of them might just be interesting to think about, like: What is it like to be a bat? FUN.
Margo Tanenbaum
Written by a British professor of philosophy, this is a book on life’s big questions aimed at the junior philosophy set. The book features a lively text and a retro 1950’s cartoon-style design, that, while it doesn’t seem to have anything to do with philosophy, adds a quirky look and feel to the text. The book covers a wide range of topics ranging from the big bang, what happened before the big bang, the meaning of life, whether some people are psychic, how can we tell right from wrong, what is ...more
Erroll Treslan
This is a must have for any parent who would like to raise a freethinking child. I store our edition right beside our Taylor's Bible Story Book! BTW, the author should be commended for making philosophy accessible to a lay audience.
Mark Edon
OK it is for kids but most adults would benefit from this too - I did.

The disciplined way of thinking about issues gives you a hint that some philosophers do actually do some useful stuff.
Sarah
Really liked the illustrations & use of humor...but I question quoting Jon Bon Jovi on the "Miracles" page.
Mia Rayner
I think It was awesome because it answered lots of my questions
Katya
Katya marked it as to-read
Jun 14, 2015
Krista Lord
Krista Lord marked it as to-read
Jun 02, 2015
Zugzug
Zugzug marked it as to-read
Apr 20, 2015
Betty
Betty added it
Feb 18, 2015
Kathleen Kenny
Kathleen Kenny marked it as to-read
Dec 19, 2014
Chris Haddlesey
Chris Haddlesey marked it as to-read
Oct 16, 2014
Ashley Adams
Ashley Adams marked it as to-read
Jan 29, 2015
Rachel
Rachel marked it as to-read
Jun 02, 2014
Radka Kopecká
Radka Kopecká marked it as to-read
May 05, 2014
« previous 1 3 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
17858
Stephen Law is a philosopher who teaches at Heythrop College in the University of London. He also edits the journal THINK, a source of philosophy aimed at the general public, affiliated with The Royal Institute of Philosophy.
More about Stephen Law...
Believing Bullshit: How Not to Get Sucked into an Intellectual Black Hole The Philosophy Gym: 25 Short Adventures in Thinking The Philosophy Files Philosophy The Great Philosophers

Share This Book