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Aqua Shock: The Water Crisis in America
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Aqua Shock: The Water Crisis in America

2.29 of 5 stars 2.29  ·  rating details  ·  14 ratings  ·  5 reviews
An objective look at America's rapidly shrinking water supplyOnce believed to be a problem limited to America's southwest, water shortages are now an issue coast to coast, from New England to California. In "Aqua Shock: The Water Crisis in America," author Susan J. Marks provides a comprehensive analysis of the current conflicts being waged over dwindling water supplies. S ...more
Hardcover, 226 pages
Published October 14th 2009 by Bloomberg Press (first published 2009)
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This book is an okay primer on water issues, but I found many things problematic with the book, first of which was the ~8th grade reading level of the book which I found somewhat annoying to read.

The biggest problem I have with Aqua Shock is the hopelessly bipartisan and individualistic approach it takes to water issues. Marks brings up important issues such as water: commodity or right, and then details the opinions of both sides without really digging in to the fact that if water is a commodit
Aug 31, 2015 Lauren rated it 2 of 5 stars
Recommended to Lauren by: Steven Gilbert
This book was a slog to get through. I could tell that the author had done her research, but she really should fire whoever she had editing this book. No chapter reads cohesively. Paragraphs feel like they were thrown in at random with transitions added to give the illusion of a coherent story line. In truth, ideas pop in only to be discarded the following paragraph, and then pop up again some 20 pages later. The organization makes the book much more of a chore to read through than it should be.
A provocative book that will make you water-smart and a better citizen

While water may seem to be a simple substance, the United States and the rest of the world face a dangerous water crisis due to a complex culmination of events. Journalist Susan J. Marks uses a deft writing style that glides from anecdotal reports to studies of the scientific and environmental dimensions of water scarcity, as well as the implications for national security. Unfortunately, in some places, a staccato of bullet-p
Jeff Scott

It seems like this book is intended to be an academic primer for water issues in the United States. It reads like a reporter attempting to sensationalize an issue. There are far better books addressing water issues. Although many of those books deal with western water issues they offer a far more compelling and interesting stories- Cadillac Desert,A River No More, and other books tell this story far better. In fact anyone that has taken a sip of tap water in Phoenix understands water salinity is
Timothy Griffin
While the information in this book is interesting, the presentation is repetitive to the point of annoyance. It almost seems that this was written as a series of high-school term papers.
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