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The Portable Jung (Portable Library)

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4.22  ·  Rating Details ·  2,756 Ratings  ·  70 Reviews
This comprehensive collection of writings by the epoch-shaping Swiss psychoanalyst was edited by Joseph Campbell, himself the most famous of Jung's American followers. It comprises Jung's pioneering studies of the structure of the psyche - including the works that introduced such notions as the collective unconscious, the Shadow, Anima and Animus - as well as inquiries int ...more
Paperback, 659 pages
Published 1976 by Penguin (first published 1971)
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Roy Lotz
People will do anything, no matter how absurd, to avoid facing their own souls.

Many years ago, after finishing Joseph Campbell’s Hero with a Thousand Faces, I was so impressed that I set myself the goal to read all of the authors Campbell cites as major influences—Freud, Nietzsche, Frazer, Durkheim, William James, and the biggest influence, Carl Jung. Unfortunately, as in most of my reading projects, I got sidetracked before finishing; so this collection of Jung’s works, edited by Campbell hi
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Chloé
Mar 29, 2009 Chloé rated it it was amazing
I love this book. I even carry it in my purse, because I can always reread sections and get more out of it each time. The introduction by Joseph Campbell was my first exposure to Carl Jung (and Campbell as well). It was very clear and comprehensive, and with Campbell's vast knowledge on mythological matters, thus linking him to analytical psychology to an extent, I trust that the selections of text are some of the best for a good understanding of Jung's theories. It covers his views on marriage, ...more
Natacha Pavlov
Sep 21, 2013 Natacha Pavlov rated it really liked it
Shelves: psychology
This compilation consists of 15 articles that cover a range of Jung’s work. Given the variety of articles found in this book, it would be a great place to start to get an overall feel for the breadth of Jung’s work. Some of the topics covered include the collective unconscious, psychological types, dream symbolism in relation to alchemy, spiritual problem of modern man, differences in thinking between East and West, synchronicity and his dissertation “Answer to Job.” As usual, I retained some in ...more
Chris
Oct 08, 2009 Chris rated it really liked it
I loved reading Jung for the first time. I was introduced to his writing through the strong references of Joseph Campbell (who compiled and edited this book),and many others who have appreciated his incisive probings into the meaning of the unconscious and personality types.

Jung really seems like a person who cares. His writings come across as a bit more hortatory (encouraging and urging) rather than a technical dissection of the mind. He isn't just a psychologist or a scientist, he's a philosop
...more
Chris brown
The first thing that I will say is that this is an amazing book. This is well worth the trip down to the local bookstore; finding the Psychology section; searching through what is really "self-help" (late night crapola that has become popular) to find this gem. If you're like most people then you'll probably go to amazon or some other place so I will save you the trouble and post the link.

http://www.amazon.com/Portable-Jung-V...

Now to the book.

Edited by Joseph Campbell ( http://en.wikipedia.org/
...more
Clay Kallam
Jan 19, 2012 Clay Kallam rated it really liked it
Shelves: philosophy
"The Portable Jung" solved a problem for me: I had always wanted to read some of Jung's work, but I had no idea where to start -- and he has written a lot of very long books. This compendium, edited by Joseph Campbell, seemed to me to be a very good introduction to Jung's thought.

There are 15 essays in the 650 pages, and though as usual some are better than others, by the time I finished "The Portable Jung" I felt I had a much better understanding of his thought. Of course, some of his ideas hav
...more
Johnny
Aug 17, 2008 Johnny rated it liked it
Shelves: psychology
It would take too long to recount the insights in the multiple volume set of Jung’s works available at my local library. It is both voluminous and verbose. It would take up far too much room in my personal library (which is already far too cumbersome), so I am thankful for this paperback volume of 650 pages, edited by the late, great Joseph Campbell. In this volume, Campbell sets out Jung’s basic understanding of archetypes, the collective unconscious, dream theory, perceptions of general person ...more
David
Nov 06, 2012 David rated it it was amazing
Shelves: psychology
Joseph Campbell selected numerous excerpts from the writings of Carl Jung and compiled them into this large volume. He assembled it into three parts and his particular sequence helps bring the reader up to speed on the general terms and patient cases that Jung refers to in many of his later works. I felt Campbell assembled a fine selection of Carl Jung's works and by the time I reached the "Answer to Job" chapter at the end of the book I was able to read it at a smooth pace, without needing to s ...more
Don Skotch Vail
Nov 29, 2009 Don Skotch Vail rated it it was ok
I think this man is probably a genius, but he is also probably wrong about so much. Most importantly, he is possibly the worst, most confusing writer I have ever read, and a great thinker that cannot organize his thoughts is likely to miss things.

Wins:
Convincing argument that most of our mind is not accesible to our conciosness. Just might be true.

Convincing argument that we share a collective unconcious. It would make sense that we are born with instinctive common templates about life, nature
...more
Steve
Nov 04, 2008 Steve rated it liked it
Why can't we talk about Jung, and also talk about the fact that, 1) his work coincides with the rise of "spiritualism," which suggests to me that we can write off a great deal of his less-than-scholarly material as fashion, and 2) much of the theory (yes, theory) that he seems to have invented (the faithful would say "intuited"), accepted as a priori knowledge by an alarming number of "professionals" today, has given us a vast body of widely-accepted but etiologically unsound research? The net r ...more
Lezlee Hays
Aug 24, 2010 Lezlee Hays rated it it was amazing
As far as I'm concerned you're never really done reading this book. The thing that struck me while reading it, is how on earth did one man have a brain so fantastically intelligent and creative at the same time. How on earth did he have time to have all these amazing thoughts. While he certainly does owe much to the thinking of Freud, Jung's thoughts diverge pretty greatly from where Freud left off and take us to amazing places. Some of these things are astute observations. Other are incredible ...more
Acid
Aug 02, 2008 Acid rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: people interested in the archetypes, collective unconscious, personality types
this is a good place to begin reading carl jung...dealing with synchronicity, collective unconscious, archetypes, personality types (introverted, extroverted and all there shades), some case study examples from his work as an analyst... carl jung studied alchemy, mandalas, dreams, patients, and many other avenues in his research for the work upon which he has written...I learned that many symbolic types of knowledge can be integrated into ones personal work, art, music,etc... if one begins to un ...more
Amanda
Mar 04, 2011 Amanda rated it it was amazing
Wow...I am enthralled. I knew the major ideas of the psychoanalysts but never read any Freud, Jung, Lacan, etc. until I picked up this five-dollar book at the used book store. I found myself describing Jung's theory of the collective unconscious to everyone I talked with. I don't believe in his ideas with a total certainty, but he must be admired for his brilliant mind. It is an almost transcedent beauty to see how humans are connected to one another. The idea that the human mind is not situated ...more
Barbara Klaser
Feb 15, 2012 Barbara Klaser rated it it was amazing
I believe I finished this one in 2009. It was one of the first two books I read by Carl Jung. It was edited by Joseph Campbell, and I think he did an excellent job of choosing which of Jung's writings to include in order to provide a well-rounded look at Jung's work, so that someone new to Jung can in a sense put it all together and get an idea what they want to know more about for further reading. This and Memories, Dreams, Reflections were recommended to me as good choices for someone new to J ...more
Florence
Mar 30, 2010 Florence rated it really liked it
This is my first exposure to the writings of Carl Jung. I found them influencing my thought process in many ways. I frequently try to analyze my dreams and interpret my thoughts and emotional reactions in terms of the collective uncounscious. So this is the source of the Myers-Briggs test! Unlik the broad generalizations of Myers-Briggs, Jung's writing on personality type is nuanced and insightful.
Michael
Oct 24, 2010 Michael rated it it was amazing
Shelves: jung, religion
A terrific anthology of essential Jung, who's more generous than Freud, for my taste. The collective unconscious is the overriding idea of the man's work, but oddly enough I find the essay about the general description of types (extravert, introvert, thinking, feeling, etc.) to be the most interesting, if only because Jung so thoroughly and convincingly demonstrates the infinitely complex interaction between dominant characteristics and unconsciously compensating ones.
Nate Markham
Aug 10, 2008 Nate Markham rated it it was amazing
Read this cover to cover and felt a much deeper understanding of everything i ever thought that i understood. This book caused a personal changing point in my life and way of thinking. Something big clicked for me when I finally came to understand the collective unconscious and the shadow self. Coming to terms with the reality of the shadow self is the KEY TO THE LOCK.
Habiba Azab
Oct 09, 2011 Habiba Azab rated it really liked it
A wealth of psychological analysis from a unique and valuable perspective. Jung's psychology incorporates the more mysterious aspects of existence, shedding light on the unconscious and its affects on our day-to-day existence. I particularly enjoyed reading 'The Difference Between Eastern and Western Thinking', which I found especially illuminating.
Peter Mcloughlin
Jung made some valuable contributions to psychology. The Collective Unconscious and the Mythic Archetypes being the most important. However reading more of Jung leads me to conclude that he also wrote a lot of non-sense. It is because he had a few good Ideas that I give this book 3 stars but not five because I had to do a lot of sifting through garbage to get any gems.
Stefan
Dec 16, 2012 Stefan rated it it was amazing
Simply the best of Jung. The clarity, depth and engagement in his works is amazing and feels fresh and intellectually challenging and modern. Recommended. If you need somewhere to start reading Jung this is the book!
John Brooke
Sep 17, 2012 John Brooke rated it really liked it
Shelves: brain-works
I've read this book many times and am still blown away each time. There is so much we don't know about ourselves and the mysteries and messages of myths. Aptly edited by Joseph Campbell the myth miester.
Laurie
Jan 24, 2013 Laurie rated it it was amazing
One of my favorite books of all time. I carry a copy with me everywhere. In my office, at home, travelling, etc. A expert source for psychologists and people interested in the psyche.
Jim B
Jan 18, 2014 Jim B rated it it was amazing
I read this through more than once, and can still pick it up and read anywhere to find something I feel or think I have not seen before.
Briana
Aug 16, 2008 Briana rated it liked it
I read three essays out of the Portable Jung: Structure of the Psyche, the Relations between the Ego and Unconscious and the Spiritual Problem of Modern Man. I recommend all three because Jung is like licorice--you either love him or you hate him with few people taking an ambivalent position.

In modern psychology he is grudgingly given credit for some of his insights (the role of symbols across cultures, the collective unconscious and the idea of archetypes) but he is also held at arm's length f
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Mariam
Dec 22, 2014 Mariam rated it it was amazing
This book is a compilation of many articles that were written by Jung.
The way this book was arranged made a lot of sense and took me gradually step by step through Jung's main ideas and the articles were very well-chosen. So I guess it would make a good introduction for someone who wants to get into the Jungian psychology.

At the end of the book, I am not left with a bunch of well organized facts but a feeling that I have more to myself than I actually think I do. I am left with a humanitarian o
...more
Michael
Jul 25, 2010 Michael rated it really liked it
(2nd reading)

“In all earnestness I asked myself what kind of world I had stumbled into.”

In this short sentence is encompassed the excitement I have in Jung. In its shadow is the issue I take with him. What I love is the exploration of the mystery that we are and live in. What I cannot stomach is the assumptions we all almost inevitable fall into in our eagerness to know. Of course Jung himself is aware of the danger.

“Do we ever understand what we think? We only understand that kind of thinking w
...more
Chris
Dec 30, 2007 Chris rated it liked it
"It all depends on how we look at things, and not how they are in themselves."

The main reason that I picked up this book is that, since so many others on my shelves have referenced Jung, I may as well read it from the source. I found the early parts of Part I interesting, where Jung forms his analytical psychology theory and defines the various terms and structure of the psyche, Aion included. I found myself browsing through a few sections, however, even the Personality Types section as he began
...more
Larry
Jul 27, 2013 Larry rated it really liked it
A mixed bag, mostly pretty good. The first half of the book or so gives a nice overview of Jungian thought. And I found most of the remaining essays interesting and thought-provoking... with 2 exceptions...

'Individual Dream Symbolism in Relation to Alchemy': I found this rather heavy going. Jung's decision to exclude all personal detail and focus on emerging mandala imagery in a long series of dreams from one individual made this a rather dry and academic exercise.

'Answer to Job': Jung psychoana
...more
Myra
Apr 30, 2015 Myra rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
A Difficult Read, At Best

There is much of Jung's work that I believe in and appreciate. However, I don't believe this book is the best way to understand Jung. His writing is dense and very liberally peppered with Latin phrases, words, and allusions to other writers and works that only the rarest scholar is familiar with these days. I would recommend instead of trying to slog through this work to read "A Very Short Introduction To Jung". It is concise and entirely comprehensible, without the stru
...more
Aurah Sage
Apr 03, 2015 Aurah Sage rated it it was amazing
I became interested in Jung a year or two ago when I started looking into archetypes. My parents took psychology as well as religious studies in university so I was lucky enough to find Jung was already in our library - The Portable Jung and Man and His Symbols.
Portable Jung was my first and won me over. Jung absolutely "clicks" with me. He crawls into my core and sets up camp to help me understand myself and the people around me. He speaks to everyone, whether you're a Pantheist, atheist, or r
...more
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Carl Gustav Jung (/jʊŋ/; German: [ˈkarl ˈɡʊstaf jʊŋ]), often referred to as C. G. Jung, was a Swiss psychiatrist and psychotherapist who founded analytical psychology. Jung proposed and developed the concepts of extraversion and introversion; archetypes, and the collective unconscious. His work has been influential in psychiatry and in the study of religion, philosophy, archeology, anthropology, l ...more
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“We want to have certainties and no doubts--results and no experiments--without even seeing that certainties can arise only through doubt and results only through experiment.” 5 likes
“Civilized life today demands concentrated, directed conscious functioning, and this entails the risk of a considerable dissociation from the unconscious. The further we are able to remove ourselves from the unconscious through directed functioning, the more readily a powerful counterposition can build up in the unconscious, and when this breaks out it may have disagreeable consequences.” 4 likes
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