Dark Avengers/Uncanny X-Men: Utopia
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Dark Avengers/Uncanny X-Men: Utopia (Dark Avengers)

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3.75 of 5 stars 3.75  ·  rating details  ·  1,472 ratings  ·  51 reviews
WHO ARE THE DARK X-MEN?

He has his own Avengers team and now Norman Osborn has his own X-Men team.

The other shoe has finally dropped and Emma Frost has betrayed Cyclops and the rest of the X-Men. And that's just one of the huge surprises in "UTOPIA." Is that Namor? Cloak and Dagger? Professor X?!

The thing that you aren't ready for is that Osborn is right.

Collecting DARK...more
Hardcover, 352 pages
Published November 25th 2009 by Marvel Comics (first published 2009)
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Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 1,973)
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Nicolo Yu
This was a well drawn crossover between two of Marvel’s biggest properties, the Avengers and the X-Men. As is wont between two super teams, the groups engaged in some unadulterated mayhem. Overall, the story was rather forgettable but the ramifications of the final chapter of this story extended beyond this six-part storyline.

The X-Men now have their own island distinct from the United States. No longer were they beholden to the United States whose top law enforcer was a schizophrenic super-vil...more
Lindsay
I'm a huge fan of the X-Men, but I'm most familiar with the All-New, All-Different X-Men Chris Claremont debuted in 1975. I pretty much have everything about that X-team from its inception to its disintegration and re-forming as two separate teams. Then the 1990s happened, and, having sampled a few issues from that time period, I decided I can safely skip that whole chapter in X-history. I caught back up with the X-Men in college, when Chris Claremont came back for "X-Men: The New Age," which I...more
William Thomas
Matt Fraction is not my favorite writer in the Marvel Universe. In fact, I think he is one of the laziest writers on the roster. And that's saying a lot coming from the Marvel universe these days where lazy is par for the course. With that said, Matt Fraction doesn't disappoint- because I had no hope whatsoever in him to begin with.

The purpose of this book is clear from the title- a sales gimmick. A way to mash-up the new Dark Avengers into the world of mutants and sell more books between the tw...more
Keith
As Amazon reviews will helpfully tell you, the issues in this book were printed out of order. Not like someone made a mistake -- it's just that the main Utopia storyline, playing out as it does across many different X-titles, doesn't really make a lot of sense without a lot of the peripheral world-building, character-backstorying stuff originally published across a bunch of other X-titles around the same time. Sure, you can read Utopia 1-6 and you'll see the heroes win and the bad guys get punch...more
Matt Chic
(softcover)

The single review quote on the back of this book says "...(Fraction and Silvestri) set up Marvel's big summer crossover in and interesting, complex way."

'Intersting'?!!! 'Complex'?! Those are some killer adjectives... Uhhh, yeah. I think that reviewer was just trying not to be mean, cause honestly the main story was pretty weak, and although I really like Fraction's work on IRON MAN, this didn't do much for me. Kept my interest I guess, but after the main six-chapter arc, I actually e...more
Mike
Re-reading this next to Carey's X-Men Legacy, and I gotta say hands-down, Fraction is the better X-Men writer. I don't care how much emotional weight Carey's childhood full of X-Men carries, he just flat-out writes some if the flattest, most tinny X-men dialogue I've read this last couple of years. (I shouldn't be too hard on him tho - he's not half as tone-deaf to decent dialogue as Dan Slott's been in his Avengers run - yeesh.)

Deodato's art at the end is fan-f'ing-tastic, and it really stands...more
Ernest
I have mixed feelings about this volume. As an X-Men fan (and Marvel fan generally), I really liked seeing how everything connects together and the story plays out. The art is generally well done, if a little large in each page (there could be more panels per page). Yet, there is something ultimately something lacking in this volume-I cannot figure out whether it is there sheer volume of the Marvel universe (one really needs an understanding of the world to properly understand and appreciate thi...more
Sonic
Parts of this were thrilling, especially for those of us familiar with the histories of most of the characters involved. This world of the "Marvel Universes" which for me is something of a cross between mythology and soap opera, this world of powers and personalities can be magical if it is handled consistently both in terms of content and quality. Quality is one thing that is lacking at times in these story compilations with many different writers and artists, so while I really dug this on the...more
Jaime
I don't read the X-Men series. All that I have read of the X-Men are through the lens of a Marvel crossover event, like House of M and Civil War. Therefore, I didn't have any issue with how this book holds up vis-á-vis the X-Men's own line. As a collection connected with Dark Reign, I thought it was excellent.

During Secret Invasion, Norman Osborn stole the information needed to kill the Skrull queen in order to set himself up as a hero. It worked perfectly. The resulting period is called the Dar...more
David Edmonds
Well, the X-Men's stay in San Francisco is short lived. The Humanity Now! Organization's march through San Francisco in support of their bill to regulate mutant breeding brings about riots on both sides of the struggle. When the situation seems to be escalating out of control, Norman Osborn and his Dark Avengers descend on the city to bring order back to the city. And on top of that, Emma's secrets finally come to the front as she reveals that she has teamed with Osborn as leader of his newly fo...more
Caz Edmunds
The vision or dream of Utopia itself apart from a fleeting one, is truly ambitious. But to collect several issues of Dark Avengers and Uncanny X-men in the hopes of establishing coherence in one continuous read is definitely no easy feat either.

This graphic novel collects Uncanny X-men #513-#514; Dark Avengers #7-8; Dark X-Men The Beginning: #1-3; X-Men Legacy #226-#227; Dark X-men: The Confession and material from Dark Reign: The Cabal. This collection released last year 2010 and written by Mat...more
Anchorpete
I really liked this book. The question is, would I have liked it at the time it came out? It was very clear, around the time Dark Avengers/Uncanny X-men hit the shelves, everyone was feeling event fatigue. We went from Civil War to Secret Invasion, to Dark Reign.
Seeing where the X-men are today, post Avengers VS X-men (hey wait, isn't that what this book is about?) it is fun to travel back to a time where Wolverine and Cyclops were still on the same team.
What I found interesting in this colle...more
Martin
The main Utopia storyline is only about 154 pages long, less than half the book's total page count. It is a good, well-written crossover event. Matt Fraction does not disappoint. The Dark Avengers VS The X-Men? A real treat. We even get Dark X-Men in this story: There's Cloak & Dagger [who are not mutants], who've been sort-of coerced by Osborn into joining; we've got Weapon Omega and Mimic [who are both nuts], Dark Wolverine [Daken] and... two surprise members. No love is lost between the D...more
André
Utopia is probably one of the best built Marvel HC collections I've read. It includes Utopia by Matt Fraction and Dark Reign: The Cabal, Dark X-men: The Beginning and two numbers of X-men Legacy.
Even for one who knew nothing about the "Dark Reign", this was a very good start, being a great take on the theme, showing the X-men's role and Norman Osborn's scheme to take care of the mutants. It allows the reader to peek into Osborn's mind, to understand his behaviour and his plans for the humanity...more
Aaron
To be fair to this book, I have not read any of the rest of Fraction's X-Men stuff, and this is definitely much more for X readers than it is for Dark Avengers readers, like myself. The vast majority of the setup leading up to this confrontation was clearly contained in the X books, as it just kind of crops up out of nowhere in the Dark Avengers series. This left me fairly unclear as to why so much violence exploded out of seemingly nowhere in this book. However, I can't really forgive this book...more
Moe
I had mixed feelings about this story it was a typical X-Men story even though this was supposed to be Dark Avengers/Uncanny X-Men. I understand the concept of "Dark" but too many of the characters were psycho there wasn't enough balance for me it seemed a bit forced and amped up. The story was decent but again it was a typical X-Men story and for a franchise that loosely bases the struggle of mutants on the struggles of minorities in America there are surprisingly few you're more likely to see...more
Ryan
Jun 25, 2012 Ryan rated it 3 of 5 stars
Shelves: justok
This could have been better, but was poorly written. The main story has some good ideas that start out well. But then the story is shifted to a bunch of conversations with Norman Osborn. After, that, we see a whole lot of characters get a few panels each. Very confusing to the reader, apparently even moreso to the writer. Fraction has trouble keeping the personalities straight and constantly dips into redundancy.

I felt a relief when we moved into the Legacy issues because they focused on a few...more
David Faber
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Travis
Gotta say this was a good book. Norman Osborn is in full stride taking on the world. I especially liked the whole dark x men and avengers. Great character development, tons of action, overall good writing. Colossus vs venom, I needed more!!!! Side note: only half of this book is the utopia story, lots of side stories. Some good some bad
Dima Yakovenko
Сюжет повествует о борьбе Скотта Самерса (Циклоп) и Нормана Осборна (Зеленый Гоблин/Железный Патриот), мутантов и людей, людей-икс и темных мстителей. В общем и в целом, сценарист придумал довольно интересную историю, которая, правда, не то что не хватает звезд с неба, а даже и не смотрит на это самое небо и не мечтает о нем. Сюжет наполнен различными штампами и банальными вещами, диалоги особо не блещут, а финал можно предсказать с первого выпуска. Но стоит отдать автору должное: на протяжении...more
Timo
So hard he tries to bring a new point of view to the age old mutants vs. humans thingamalee. Did he deliver? Not too well.
But at the positive side: he brings a new home for mutants. I do not want to spoil things from those who have not read this story, but man, that new home gives hints to great stories.
Eric
Feb 08, 2012 Eric rated it 4 of 5 stars
Shelves: x-men
Finally made it to the big Utopia story and it's pretty good. As mutant births are on the way to being outlawed and San Fransico is putting a curfew on mutants all together, the last remaining X-Men stand against the wave of protest and the agressive tactics of the Dark Avengers and Norman Osborn. What makes this work is how core to the X-Men these threats are. It's good to see them standing for mutant rights while just trying to survive. It's not a perfect story as it feels like very little hap...more
Fizzgig76
Reprints Dark Avengers/Uncanny X-Men: Utopia #1, Uncanny X-Men #513-514, Dark Avengers #7-8, Dark Avengers #7-8, Dark X-Men: The Beginning #1-3, X-Men Legacy #226-227, Dark X-Men: The Confession #1, and Dark Reign: The Cabal. Osborn and his Dark Avengers are forced to move in on San Francisco as the X-Men has conflicts with Trask and his followers. The main story is ok. Like many of Marvel's crossovers it ends in a big fight, but this one at least made a bit more sense. The supplimental stories...more
Verónica
Fue bastante regular, algo falto, algo me dejo vacia y no se qué pudo ser. Esperaba mucho más, pero al menos pase un buen rato con esta lectura.
Stephen
The main 6 chapter storyline: 3.5 stars. Decent writing and pretty standard illustration. Really helpful were the short descriptions next to each character when they first appear. Essential in a story arc like this where a sizable chunk of the Marvel Universe appears in a span of like 9 issues.

Everything else, 2.5 stars, mostly because I was out of my element, not recognizing heroes, etc.

I wouldn't recommend reading this without some sort of X-Men background, especially with regards to the conce...more
William Axtell
This is a good read. The main story starts off absolutely fantastically and it ends well, though I feel it could have been a bit better as it is slightly anti-climactic. Also, there is a lot of bonus material which in all honesty is not up to the standard of the main feature, though enjoyable. Except maybe the Namor story, that is really rather good as a psycological insight. However, every X-Fan could do with this story as it contains one of the most game-changing events in recent X history, so...more
Kevin
Fills in well with the running storyline of X-Men vs. Avengers.
Shannon Appelcline
The actual Utopia story is top-rate, with great writing, great interactions, and great and dramatic new status quo for the team [9/10]. The confessional that follows is almost as strong and shows why Cyclops and Emma have a deeper and more meaningful relation than Jean and Scott's ever was depicted [8/10]. The Legacy story does a good job of setting up Rogue's new role in the X-Men [7/10] The short stories that end things off are nice vignettes, but without much depth [6/10].
Anastasia
(14) LIBRARY
Fraser Sherman
When mutant-human riots break out in San Francisco, Norman Osborne sends his criminal team of Avengers to keep order. Mostly reminds me why I gave up on the X-books during the 1990s: mindless battles between armies of characters, endless posturing about making hard choices, and lots of anti-mutant discrimination.
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61382
"How he got started in comics: In 1983, when Fraction was 7 years old and growing up in Kansas City, Mo., he became fascinated by the U.S. invasion of Grenada and created his own newspaper to explain the event. "I've always been story-driven, telling stories with pictures and words," he said.

Education and first job: Fraction never graduated from college. He stopped half a semester short of an art...more
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