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Ghazali and the Poetics of Imagination

4.15  ·  Rating Details  ·  13 Ratings  ·  2 Reviews
Abu Hamid al-Ghazali, a Muslim jurist-theologian and polymath who lived from the mid-eleventh to the early twelfth century in present-day Iran, is a figure equivalent in stature to Maimonides in Judaism and Thomas Aquinas in Christianity. He is best known for his work in philosophy, ethics, law, and mysticism. In an engaged re-reading of the ideas of this preeminent Muslim ...more
Paperback, 368 pages
Published June 30th 2005 by University of North Carolina Press (first published 2005)
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Ebadur
May 08, 2009 Ebadur is currently reading it
“...an observation that stems from my reading of classical Islamic texts, whether they be law, theology, history, mysticism, or philosophy. When studying the ancients, I am struck the epistemic openness and the liberty with which many thinkers and authors energetically engaged with a wide variety of knowledge traditions. They did so without allowing the provenance of knowledge be a decisive veto factor. Hence, a good portion of early Muslim intellectuals were open to the spirit of knowledge, whe ...more
Umar
Feb 12, 2010 Umar rated it really liked it


Moosa seemed to me to be pretentious and showy at first- dry and terse, but as I kept reading I am grateful we have thinkers such as him. He doesn't hesitate to use new terminology or coin his own terms and ideas, which is refreshing and direly needed in Muslim discourse. His insights and message can be drowned out by using the language of western social theory (ethics, instead of adab/tasawwuf or subjectivity instead of nafs or ruh, conscience instead of sirr). But he draws from a lot of source
...more
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