Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Cien años de soledad” as Want to Read:
Cien años de soledad
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating

Cien años de soledad

3.99 of 5 stars 3.99  ·  rating details  ·  426,603 ratings  ·  14,981 reviews
El libro se compone de 20 capítulos no titulados, en los cuales se narra una historia con una estructura cíclica temporal, ya que los acontecimientos del pueblo y de la familia Buendía, así como los nombres de los personajes se repiten una y otra vez, fusionando la fantasía con la realidad. En los tres primeros capítulos se narra el éxodo de un grupo de familias y el estab ...more
Paperback, 347 pages
Published December 1979 by La oveja negra (first published 1967)
more details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Cien años de soledad, please sign up.

Popular Answered Questions

Huda Aweys Well, simply because it is not an ordinary novel, it's a display of philosophical ideas which the Marxists , Communists and socialists beleive in it…moreWell, simply because it is not an ordinary novel, it's a display of philosophical ideas which the Marxists , Communists and socialists beleive in it about history!
to understand and receive this novel
to like it or not
you must understand this philosophy first , and if you like it and become one of the supporters will be given for the novel , 5 star and if you do not like it you will give it one star only ! , it is not about the novel , it is is only philosophy , fanatics !(less)
This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  rating details
Adam
Mar 28, 2008 Adam rated it 1 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Academics and their students that are forced to read it.
Recommended to Adam by: I'd rather not say
Shelves: classics
So I know that I'm supposed to like this book because it is a classic and by the same author who wrote Love in the Time of Cholera. Unfortunately, I just think it is unbelievably boring with a jagged plot that seems interminable. Sure, the language is interesting and the first line is the stuff of University English courses. Sometimes I think books get tagged with the "classic" label because some academics read them and didn't understand and so they hailed these books as genius. These same acade ...more
Chris
Revised 28 March 2012

Huh? Oh. Oh, man. Wow.

I just had the
weirdest dream.

There was this little town, right? And everybody had, like, the same two names. And there was this guy who lived under a tree and a lady who ate dirt and some other guy who just made little gold fishes all the time. And sometimes it rained and sometimes it didn’t, and… and there were fire ants everywhere, and some girl got carried off into the sky by her laundry…

Wow. That was messed up.

I need some coffee.


The was roughly ho
...more
Meg
May 28, 2011 Meg rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Meg by: Springville Library Book Club
I guarantee that 95% of you will hate this book, and at least 70% of you will hate it enough to not finish it, but I loved it. Guess I was just in the mood for it. Here's how it breaks down:

AMAZING THINGS: I can literally feel new wrinkles spreading across the surface of my brain when I read this guy. He's so wicked smart that there's no chance he's completely sane. His adjectives and descriptions are 100% PERFECT, and yet entirely nonsensical. After reading three chapters, it starts making sens
...more
Laura
More like A Hundred Years of Torture. I read this partly in a misguided attempt to expand my literary horizons and partly because my uncle was a big fan of Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Then again, he also used to re-read Ulysses for fun, which just goes to show that you should never take book advice from someone whose IQ is more than 30 points higher than your own.

I have patience for a lot of excesses, like verbiage and chocolate, but not for 5000 pages featuring three generations of people with the
...more
brian
i remember the day i stopped watching cartoons: an episode of thundercats in which a few of the cats were trapped in some kind of superbubble thing and it hit me that, being cartoons, the characters could just be erased and re-drawn outside the bubble. or could just fly away. or tunnel their way out. or teleport. or do whatever, really, they wanted... afterall they were line and color in a world of line and color. now this applies to any work of fiction -- i mean, Cervantes could've just written ...more
Tasneem


أنا أؤمن في الإنسان و في قدراته العقلية و الإبداعية و أن العبقرية ليس لها سقف أو حدود, و لكن ..

أستطيع أن أعقد لكم الأيمان على أحد شيئين..


إما أن "ماركيز" ليس من البشر, بل هو ممسوس . يتلقى المساعدة _في كتاباته_ من ملك الجان شخصيا,, أو ربما كان يتلقاها من الجدات/الجنيات القديمات اللاوتي شهدن خلق الكون و يحفظن عن ظهر قلب ما سيؤول إليه حال الخليقة منذ أن أخرج الله البشر من ظهور آبائهم و أشهدهم على أنفسهم و أطلقهم في الأرض ليستعيدوا ذاكرة فقدوها.


أو أنه إنسـان مثلنا, يملك ما نملك و لا يزيد عنا يدا أو
...more
Brian
One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez is a tremendous piece of literature. It's not an easy read. You're not going to turn its pages like you would the latest John Grisham novel, or The DaVinci Code. You have to read each page, soaking up every word, immersing yourself in the imagery. Mr. Marquez says that he tells the story as his grandmother used to tell stories to him: with a brick face. That's useful to remember while reading, because that is certainly the tone the book tak ...more
Huda Yahya

شعـــــورك بالعجـــــز

هذه هي مشكلة الرواية الكبرى

أنت في حال من الافتنان والنشوة لا يوصف
وانعقاد لسانك يسبق أفكارك
ويبقى بداخلك صراع دائم
يتجسد في محاولات مضحكة للتعبير عن هذه المتعة

لذا كنت احاول مراراً خلق التعبيرات المناسبة فأجدها تخرج لسانها في سخرية تاركة إياي في حيرة وقلة حيلة

عندما أمسكت بهذه الرواية لأول مرّة شعرت بانفصال تام عن الواقع من حولي
وجدتني بداخل ماكوندو حيّة أتنفس وأرى الشخصيات من حولي تتصارع مع حيواتها كما أراد لها خالقها العبقري

أنا كنتُ هناك ولا أبالغ بحرف

حلّقتُ بخفة بين موجات الح
...more
Martine
I must have missed something. Either that, or some wicked hypnotist has tricked the world (and quite a few of my friends, it would seem) into believing that One Hundred Years of Solitude is a great novel. How did this happen? One Hundred Years of Solitude is not a great novel. In fact, I'm not even sure it qualifies as a novel at all. Rather it reads like a 450-page outline for a novel which accidentally got published instead of the finished product. Oops.

Don't get me wrong. I'm not disputing th
...more
Kenghis Khan
"The book picks up not too far after Genesis left off." And this fictitious chronicle of the Buendia household in the etherial town of Macondo somewhere in Latin America does just that. Rightly hailed as a masterpiece of the 20th century, Garcia Marquez's "One Hundred Years of Solitude" will remain on the reading list of every pretentious college kid, every under-employed author, every field-worker in Latin America, and indeed should be "required reading for the entire human race," as one review ...more
Philip
Guernica

I imagine these people looking and saying, "Yes, but what does it mean?" As literary critics everywhere cringe or roll over in their clichéd graves I approach this text and review the same way. One Hundred Years of Solitude... beautiful, intriguing... but what does it mean? And does it have to mean anything?

Oscar Wilde: "All art is at once surface and symbol. Those who go beneath the surface do so at their peril. Those who read the symbol do so at their peril." And what about those who skip acro
...more
إسراء البنا
بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

الرواية فى قمة الروعة
تستحق فعلا جائزة نوبل للادب

بالرغم من تداخل الاشخاص فى الرواية و اعادة الاسماء فتلك السلالة الطويلة .. يسمى فيها الابناء باسمين اما اورليانو او خوسيه
و تتعدد الاجيال و تمر السنين و يتسم ابناء هذه السلالة بالعزلة

و لكن تلك العزلة تختلف
فلا يجد فيها ملل بلا على عكس فيها حياة

اول السلالة كانت نهايته تحت شجرة الكستناء و اخر السلالة انتهى فى الغابة عن طريق النمل

اتعجب من ماركيز كيف استطاع ان ينهى تلك الرواية بتلك النهاية المثالية
فلم اكن اتوقع ابداً النها
...more
mai ahmd
حين تفكر بقراءة هذه الرواية يجب أن تضع نصب عينيك أنك لا تقرأ عملا اعتياديا يستلزم جهدا مشابها
عليك أن تترك كل حواسك مع الكتاب
المترجم علماني كان متفهما جدا لطبيعة القارىء العربي وربما صعوبة التواصل مع أسماء بهذا الكم وأجيال بهذا العدد فما كان منه إلا أن وضع خارطة للأجيال الستة التي مروا على قرية ماكوندو من أسرة خوسيه أركاديو بوينديا تسهيلا وحتى لا يقع القارىء في لبس الأسماء وهذا يحسب لعلماني كمترجم له باع في الترجمة بلغة سلسة أصبح يتهافت عليها الجميع

الرواية من الروايات العظيمة والتي تقدم دروسا
...more
Mohammed Arabey
ما الذي كنت تنتظره؟- تنهدت أورسولا, وأضافت :- إن الــزمـــن يـمـضـي
description
الــزمـن , وقسوة مروره ,هو بالنسبة لي التيمة الأساسية بهذه الرواية, هذا السطر هو اول ما بث في قلبي قشعريرة غير متوقعة بعد مرور ربعها , و أخترت أن أبدأ به,لأحكي حكايتي مع تلك المدينة التي ابتدعها جابريل جارسيا ماركيز -رحمه الله- في عزلة من الزمن....مــاكــونـدو
description
أولا: أزاي تستمتع بهذه الرواية
---------------------------

**ابعد تماما عن اي افكار مسبقة عنها, الفصل حوالي 25 صفحه,اعط لنفسك مالايقل عن 45 دقيقة الي ساعة لقراءته, فالرواية ل
...more
Stephen M
Jul 24, 2012 Stephen M rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: solitude is bliss
Recommended to Stephen M by: The most beautiful girl at school
Many years later, as the most beautiful girl in town disclosed the book from her folded arms and revealed its brilliant glow to his eyes, Francisco Rodriguez de la Campiña was to recall that distant, savage summer when his grandmother first taught him to read. At that time, he would spend hours under the cockspur coral tree behind their bark and leaf house while his grandmother, Pilar Popa, lectured him on the finer points of grammatical etiquette. Peering over his shoulder, grasping his elbows ...more
أحمد رشيد
إنها لَمدعاة إلى الدهشة... حقاً!!!
ظننت في البداية بأن الموضوع عبارة عن اختلاف في الآراء و الأذواق...
و لكنه الآن بات جلياً واضحاً... إنه حتماً ليس كذلك!!!
***************
المسألة و ما فيها أنني كلما اخترت كتاباً حائزاً على جائزة خرافية لأقرأه... أتفاجأ بأنه لا يرقى حتى لمستوى النشر!!!
ما هذا التناقض الجبّار؟؟!!
في البداية "لا أحد يعرف ما أريده" و الآن "مئة عام من العزلة" ...
كتب حصدت جوائز قيمة... الأخيرة منهما حصلت على أرقى الجوائز الأدبية التي من الممكن أن تُحصد في هذا العالم... جائزة نوبل للآداب!!!
...more
Mister Jones
Apr 06, 2008 Mister Jones rated it 1 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Drunken frauds who see Shamans on a road during a LSD flashback
Recommended to Mister Jones by: Art and Fart Crapper
I must be missing something about this one, and whatever it is, I know it's not much.

I didn't enjoy it; I wanted it to be a fulfilling and rewarding read; I want it to be everything that everyone else said it was and then some.

So, I learned that some works aren't worth it--not worth reading, not worth the time, and not worth putting faith in what others may deem "a beautiful book."

Marquez pops characters in and out with different brief activities and events, scattering them into a literary colla
...more
Mala
Review of One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Márquez.
Shelf: Latin American writing,Magical Realism,Nobel Prize winners,Brain Pain Group read.
Recommended for: You.

"Sometimes great books have deleterious consequences for other writers, creating footsteps that can’t be walked in, shade the sun can’t penetrate, expectations that have no grounds. Gabriel García Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude crushed the hopes of scores of young Colombian writers, and the spread of magic realism
...more
Ahmad Ashkaibi
قبل أن أقول رأيي في الكتاب... أقول لمن نصحني به: سامحك الله على هذ النصحية.. أضعت مالي ووقتي فيما لا يفيد....
ثم أتعجب من أولئك الذين أعجبهم الكتاب بحيث وضعوا له خمس نجمات... بل وإن منهم من يقول إن الكتاب غير حياته... لا أدري هل كان هذا الكتاب الوحيد الذي قرأوه في حياتهم؟ هل غابت عنهم عيون الأدب؟ لا أدري ماذا حل بالذوق الأدبي للقراء العرب...
ومن ثم أقول للمترجم... هداك الله.. ضيعت وقتك وأوقاتنا في غير فائدة.. المصيبة أنه يعلق على ترجمته للكتاب فيقول إن هذه الرواية من أجمل ما قرأ!
لا أدري ما هو سر و
...more
Shira
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Jason
This book went from 5, to 4, to 3 stars. It went from brilliant & zany, to unique & amusing, to overworked & predictable. Magical realism--the sine qua non of Gabriel Garcia Marquez, the archetype, the empyreal novel that pioneered the outburst of this type of South American writing. I would not re-read this novel, but I would recommend it to all who savor the radial expanse of genre in literature. To be considered a comprehensive reader at life's end, you will had to have read magic ...more
Jacey
This was the first book I'd ever read where the end was as good as the beginning and middle, that's to say -- excellent. A circular story of a family through the generations, through the banana trees, through the political turmoil. Magical realism at it's best.

If it helps, by the time you get half way through the book you shouldn't have to look at the family tree at the front of the book anymore.
Bassam Ahmed
ملكيادس مات و خوززيه الجد مات واورسولا ماتت و خوزيه الصايع مات و العقيد اوريليانو مات وروبيكا ماتت و اوريليانو العاشق مات والحزين مات وتيرزيزا كمان ماتت وارمانتا ماتت واوريليانو التاني مات وخوزيه التاني مات وفيه واحد اتولد ف اخر الرواية اسمه اوريليانو برده مات دي بقت مائه عام م الوفيات اصلا :]
Paul

Well Mr Marquez may have a Nobel Prize for his mantelpiece and a pretty good imagination for writing what with the levitating women and babies made of ice cream but he has no imagination at all when he is thinking of his characters names which are like to drive you entirely insane in this novel, will you please look at this. There are five people called Arcadio, ,three ladies called Remedios, two ladies called Amaranta and there’s a Pietro and a Petra which look quite similar, and there are 23 p
...more
Evan
That's it, enough!
A virtuosic bamboozle, this...
A cold jag with no heart or soul, told from an omniscient distance. He did this and that, and she did this and that, and they did this and that. No inner heart, no longing, no sense of people, of desire, of inner worlds and struggles. Just cold actions. Just a cartoon world full of incident and surface color but little inner feeling. Cold and distant and shallow to me. It was like a guy at the bar droning on and ceasing to be interesting very earl
...more
Tim
Sep 05, 2007 Tim rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Everyone, anyone
I had a magical AP English teacher my senior year of high school, who had an ethereal, almost magical (sort of a whisper, sort of a song) voice and a flourish and passion for reading. She assigned us Garcia-Marquez' "100 Years Of Solitude," it was one of those (i'll admit and hope it doesn't sound lame or cheesy) life-changing moments.

I can't say what it was at that moment that so moved me, but I attribute this as the book that made me love reading...love words. I hadn't come across any authors
...more
محمد سيد رشوان


قلت سابقًا .. هناك نوعين من الكُتاب .. والروائيين تحديدًا ..

نوع يكتب عن نفسه ولنفسه ويستقى كل أعماله من حكاياته وتجاربه الذاتية .. بحيث أنه يجد فى الكتابة متنفسًا ويبث فيها همومه وأحزانه ، ويودعها مأساته وإحباطاته واكتئابه ..

هذا النوع من الكُتاب ينتظر أن تضيف له الرواية .. لا أن يضيف هو لها ..

وعلى الرغم من ذلك هناك تجارب صادقة تخرج ناضحة بمأساة حقيقية .. وتنز دماء ودموع صاحبها
وهناك تجارب أخرى فى هذا النوع قد لا تهم إلا صاحبها فما يسجلها فيها .. لا يعدو كونه دفتر مذكرات . أو يوميات ليس إلا

أما الن
...more
K.D. Absolutely
Jul 05, 2009 K.D. Absolutely rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Tata J
Recommended to K.D. by: 501 Must Read Books
Shelves: 1001-core, 501, favorites
After extremely enjoying the famous works of Hemingway (Old Man and The Sea), Neruda (Love Poems), Coetzee (The Life and Times of Michael K) and Steinbeck (Grapes of Wrath), I told myself I have to read some works of the other Nobel Prize of Literature awardees and I was not disappointed picking ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SOLITUDE by this Columbian author, Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

This work introduced to literature the "magical realism" style in story telling. Fantasy was incorporated to reality in tell
...more
E7san
كل الروايات تحكي حقبًا متفرقة من الزمن ، لكنّ مئة عام من العزلة تحكي الزمن ذاته !
استطاع ماركيز أن يخترع عالمًا ، أن يبني كوكبا جديدا اسمه " ماكوندو " يوزع عليه شخصيات إنسانية متشابهة الأسماء ، تختلف عنا تمامًا ، تشبهنا تماما !
من أين أبدئ ؟ حسنًا دعني أخبرك عن خط الزمن الذي خطه ماركيز ، لقد خلق ذاكرة في الكتاب ينقلها من يد شخصية إلى يد أخرى دون أن يعي القارئ بذلك !
لقد كان خوزيه أركاديو بونديه هو أول من حمل هذه الذاكرة حتى لكأنك تعتقد بأنه بطل هذه الرواية ، ثم انتقلت بخفة إلى يد زوجته أورسولا ، ول
...more
Heba
حدثتني نفسي الف الف مره ان اسكر الروايه واحرقها ..وما كان شاغلني الا كيف المترجم قدر يترجم هالاشياء..!!!؟
ما شاء الله ملتزم بالامانه الادبيه والوصف الدقيق بدون نقص او تشفير..!!!! مو معقول كميه الاشياء اللي نطيتها حتى ما اخدش حيائي

عطيته نجمتين لسببين .. الاول ان فكره الروايه جميلة وغريبة ..اعجبني كيف قدر الكاتب يخلق أحداث لقرن من الزمان بحيث ما يمل القارئ لسرعه حصولها، فيخليك تمشي مع ست اجيال وتعيش حياه كل شخص من لحظه ولادته حتى موته
اما السبب الثاني فهالروايه كانت سبب بكثره حمدي لله اللي انعم ع
...more
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 99 100 next »
  • Pedro Páramo
  • Cronopios and Famas
  • The War of the End of the World
  • The Death of Artemio Cruz
  • Ficciones
  • La tregua
  • Germinal (Les Rougon-Macquart, #13)
  • The Book of Laughter and Forgetting
  • Romancero gitano
  • Independent People
  • The Stories of Eva Luna
  • The Cairo Trilogy: Palace Walk / Palace of Desire / Sugar Street (The Cairo Trilogy #1-3)
  • A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
  • Death in Venice and Other Tales
  • Pale Fire
  • The History of the Siege of Lisbon
  • Gabriela, Clavo y Canela
13450
(Arabic: جابرييل جارسيا ماركيز)

Gabriel José de la Concordia Garcí­a Márquez was a Colombian novelist, short-story writer, screenwriter and journalist. Garcí­a Márquez, familiarly known as "Gabo" in his native country, was considered one of the most significant authors of the 20th century. In 1982, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.

He studied at the University of Bogotá and late worked a
...more
More about Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez...
Love in the Time of Cholera Chronicle of a Death Foretold Memories of My Melancholy Whores Of Love and Other Demons No One Writes to the Colonel and Other Stories

Share This Book

“He dug so deeply into her sentiments that in search of interest he found love, because by trying to make her love him he ended up falling in love with her. Petra Cotes, for her part, loved him more and more as she felt his love increasing, and that was how in the ripeness of autumn she began to believe once more in the youthful superstition that poverty was the servitude of love. Both looked back then on the wild revelry, the gaudy wealth, and the unbridled fornication as an annoyance and they lamented that it had cost them so much of their lives to find the paradise of shared solitude. Madly in love after so many years of sterile complicity, they enjoyed the miracle of living each other as much at the table as in bed, and they grew to be so happy that even when they were two worn-out people they kept on blooming like little children and playing together like dogs.” 1251 likes
“There is always something left to love.” 1185 likes
More quotes…