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Juodmedžio bokštas

3.71 of 5 stars 3.71  ·  rating details  ·  2,105 ratings  ·  69 reviews
The five masterful works of short fiction in The Ebony Tower bring us once again into the company of a great contemporary novelist working his intriguing and dazzling themes, probing the fitful relationships of fantasy and reality, love and hate, pleasure and pain. And they are an enduring testament to John Fowles's reputation as one of the finest storytellers of our time.
Hardcover, 310 pages
Published 1982 by Vaga (first published 1974)
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(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
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Justin Mitchell
Fowles is another one of those writers that uses writing in just the way I like: to elucidate ideas as clearly and concisely as possible, and not for the sake of showing off his profligate vocabulary or acrobatic verbal prowess, which is my opinion happens way too often with modern literature. What I like even more is that Fowles is obsessed with discovering and elucidating the themes that shape the modern world, and has more success than most writers. "The Ebony Tower," the first novella in thi ...more
Lobstergirl
Jan 05, 2012 Lobstergirl rated it 1 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Lobstergirl by: Marcus Bachman
I'm glad this wasn't my first exposure to Fowles, because it would have turned me off him for good and I never would have read The French Lieutenant's Woman. I didn't realize that it was a novella and four stories. (Nowhere on my copy of the book is this indicated.) The novella, The Ebony Tower, is about a dirty old man, an expat British artist living in France, his two young concubines, named the Mouse and the Freak, and David, the artist/writer who drops into their lives briefly to interview t ...more
Moses Kilolo
Though each of these stories are very interesting, I found the last two unable to match up to the first ones. I am tempted to choose a favorite among them, but that would be hard, for there are different things to love so much about each of them. My attention was however arrested by a small portion to be found in poor Koko. Fowles speaks of the nature of words, of art. Of how some of us struggle as much as we can to make sure that this form of art survives. Yet the enemy triumphs. A triumph of t ...more
Max
I don't know what my issue was here, but reading this felt like a plodding chore. Fowles' prose is still a delight, but I don't know if his storytelling works for me in the short fiction mode. The title story was sort of a light Magus, in fitting with his "variations" theme for the collection, but it doesn't reach the scope of the longer novel, despite threading in a wonderful sense of dread. There's no real release to the tension.

The Cloud is the other worthwhile story, but even that suffers f
...more
Lucy
This book was chosen by my book club. I had read The Collector and The French Lieutenant's Woman years ago and looked forward to reading The Ebony Tower.

I liked two stories out of the five - Poor Koko and The Enigma. I found the others (all five are novellas more than short stories) too wordy, very sexist and difficult to get into. I don't mind complicated stories but I really don't like it when I have to look up a lot of words. I find it pretentious and it makes me feel a bit stupid and uneduc
...more
Lavinia
What I really liked about Fowles’ stories is that each of it has a different theme and narrative technique which makes the reading very interesting. I really like some of the stories.

***
turnul de abanos e o colectie de 5 nuvele ale lui john fowles. prima, cea care da titlul cartii, aduce pe undeva cu magicianul [un batrin izolat, doua fete]. prima parte e destul de descriptiva, semi-plictisitoare, o teoretizare a artei secolului 20 [caci batrinul cu pricina e un pictor retras]. abia in a doua pa
...more
Sarah Sammis
"The Ebony Tower" returns to the theme of mentorship, telling another version a meeting with a roll model. In this case, it's a meeting of artists. David Williams, a frustrated artist detours from his holiday with his wife to interview the cantankerous Henry Breasley who lives in seclusion with two beautiful former art students: Diana (the Mouse) and Anne (the Freak). David spends the weekend being lectured on morality, sexuality and modern art. He is tempted to join this hedonistic lifestyle in ...more
Andrew
John Fowles doesn't get much respect in the States, which is pretty unfortunate. He's so good at sculpting these impressionistic, slightly sinister atmospheres. And then, rather than using them as backdrop, he plays with them, constantly forcing them to interact with human agents. It's a trick that readers of Borges and Calvino should find pretty enjoyable. The stories in The Ebony Tower, the title one above all, manages this atmosphere. And, like all the others, it's able to weave together myth ...more
Betherin
I was actually quite disappointed in how every one of these stories ended. I found them to be initially interesting, but they all petered out at the ends...so much so that I couldn't get myself to finish reading the last one. It just seemed like a waste of my time to take the time to read it when it was a) not interesting to begin with, and b) probably just going end like every one of the other stories. The Magus is one of my all-time favorites, but The Ebony Tower in no way lives up to Fowles' ...more
Maria
Разочарование след "Момичето на френския лейтенант". Пет новели, които няма да запомня с абсолютно нищо.
"Абаносовата кула" - не разбирам нищо от живопис, всички споменати художници и препратки към това изкуство не ми говорят нищо. Намерих текса за ненужно претрупан от подобна информация, което доста ме подразни. Прекъсва нишката на действието, на мисълта. Общото ми впечатление от новелата е за досада.
"Елидук" - странен изказ, което е разбираемо заради историята и произхода й. Не ми хареса особе
...more
Valentina Chugunova
Это была такая хорошая книга ровно до момента, когда она ему не дала. Такие изящные диалоги с легкой сумасшедшинкой от абсурдности всего происходящего. А потом все скатилось к неразделенной любви/желанию самого пошлого толка. И вообще забавно наблюдать, как герой резко глупеет, начиная определять свою успешность через секс.
Олена Гриньків
Ця книга – моє перше знайомство з Дж. Фаулзом. Тому я поки що не можу достатньо об'єктивно і цілісно оцінити його як письменника. У відгуках обізнаних і не дуже критиків, що зустрічаються в інтернет-мережі, зазвичай нарікається на складність викладу і заплутаність сюжету романів автора, а відтак – на їхню незрозумілість. Тому я уявляла його таким собі інтелектуалом, який багато знає, але дуже мало дбає про те, в якому вигляді ідеї його творів дійдуть до читачів. Виявилося, що Фаулз далеко не так ...more
Cody
oh my god here's another story about a creepy old man and his weird triad with some sexy nymphs, john fowles has done it again

He said gently, "Balls."
Ana
The importance of the once endless forest.
Steve Smoot
well written but not interesting.
Tim Weed
In a 1971 interview about his brilliant first novel The Magus, John Fowles admitted that he was obsessed by “the basic idea of a secret world, whose penetration involved ordeal and whose final reward was self-knowledge.” This passage from Joseph Campbell’s groundbreaking 1949 study The Hero With a Thousand Faces could have been written with a Fowles protagonist in mind:

"Once having traversed the threshold, the hero moves in a dream landscape of curiously fluid, ambiguous forms, where he must sur
...more
A.M.
The ebony tower by John Fowles
Ebony tower
The first story is that of a young married man who used to be an artist and is now more into journalism, going to interview an old artist, Henry Breasley. The old man lives with two very young women on a farm in the French countryside; Mouse and Freak. They do a lot for the old man including cook, keep house, keep him painting and provide him with company and sex. They are all artists although the women are so busy looking after Henry that they neglect th
...more
Mark
I once got in trouble with a friend by arguing that John Fowles was not a misogynist. A cultural elitist certainly, a classist absolutely. A male chauvinist maybe, but an accidental one if, indeed, he was even that. Fowles considered himself to be a feminist, in fact, and though I can't comfortably fit him into that camp, I would argue that his fiction usually shows his male characters (particularly his male protagonists) to be terrible people--far more terrible than their female counterparts.

F
...more
Anna
Эпичная книга. Бывает вот так ищешь нового для себя автора, который сможет впечатлить с первого же раза, и никакого улова. А после совершенно случайно скачиваешь книгу без всякой задней мысли, а она с первых строк увлекает. А через несколько десятков страниц и не оторваться, а к середине уже перестаешь обращать внимания на окружающий мир. И вдруг она заканчивается. И такое опустошение находит. Вроде прочитал всего несколько дней назад, а уже тянет снова погрузиться в историю и строй слов.

Очень м
...more
Janice Todd
Aug 23, 2014 Janice Todd rated it 1 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: no
Just finished this and i had to skim it to get through it. I found it tedious and boring. Perhaps if I knew the artists and art the protagonist talked about, it would have helped but it was hard to relate to Breasley, the old artist, that had isolated himself with the two young women. I remember enjoying the French Lieutenant's Woman years ago, so looked forward to reading another John Fowles...
Diana
Peter o tine pe fata dupa umeri, ea vorbeste.
- Nu-mi dau seama ce fel de fiinta este. Parca e muta.
- M-au avertizat.
Ea ii arunca o ocheada.
- Iti place?
- Ei, asta-i!
- Aseara nu ti-ai luat ochii de pe ea.
- Din amabilitate. Doar nu esti geloasa pentru ieri seara!
- Nu. Doar curioasa.
O trage mai aproape de el.
- Oricum, multumesc.
- Credeam ca barbatilor le plac femeile misterioase ca marea.
- Glumesti. Ea e prea de tot.
Fata il priveste pe sub sprancene. El ridica din umeri, apoi zambeste musc
...more
Dennis Nehamen
When I read Fowles I'm prepared to sit not only with the book but my dictionary as well. As a pure writer, he is a master. As a storyteller, he's spectacular. What I love about Ebony Tower (a collection of novelettes) is one story in particular. The set up is that he's off in a mountain cabin lent to him by a friend. He's completing a manuscript when he's intruded on by a thief. Not suspecting the encounter, the robber ties up the protagonist and then proceeds to burn his manuscript. It's Fowles ...more
Dennis A Nehamen
When I read Fowles I'm prepared to sit not only with the book but my dictionary as well. As a pure writer, he is a master. As a storyteller, he's spectacular. What I love about Ebony Tower (a collection of novelettes) is one story in particular. The set up is that he's off in a mountain cabin lent to him by a friend. He's completing a manuscript when he's intruded on by a thief. Not suspecting the encounter, the robber ties up the protagonist and then proceeds to burn his manuscript. It's Fowles ...more
Michael
This short story collection was my introduction to John Fowles, he of "The French Lieutenant's Woman" fame and "The Magus" infamy. There are 5 stories contained within and Mr. Fowles displays his prodigious skill and style throughout. My favorite was "The Enigma" (A sort of mystery story) followed by "Poor Koko." (An examination of high art and its relation to the masses). I highly recommend this.
Lisa Faye
I had to read bits and pieces of this book as part of an undergraduate English course focusing solely on Fowles. I can't believe I never noticed what a misogynist Fowles is. I did notice that his writing is very contrived even way back then. Makes me want to go back and reread The Collector and The French Lieutenant's Woman - both of which I loved at the time.

If you own the book, I'd suggest you read Eliduc, Poor Koko, and The Enigma. Whatever you do, skip The Cloud; in it you can nearly hear Fo
...more
Tanja Pestrik
Despite John Fowles is one of my favorite writers, I can't say I liked this work too much. Too much talk about art I'm not very familiar with. It made me feel a bit "underdeveloped" :)
Allison
John Fowles is one of Elizabeth George's favorite writers and since Elizabeth George is one of my favorites and I've already read all of her books... This was a collection of short stories which I did not realize when I checked it out of the library. I just tend to not like short stories - by the time I'm really getting into one, it's wrapping up. Fowles is a very descriptive, wordy and intellectual writer which made reading this a thoughtful experience (ok, slow reading). As to content, some of ...more
Pat
Nov 18, 2008 Pat rated it 3 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Fans of John Fowles
I have always been a big fan of John Fowles, but this collection didn't impress me as much as some of his other works. All the short stories were beautifully structured and written; the man's command of language is sometimes just plain astonishing. But most if not all were very much "of their time" (the book was first published in, I believe, 1973 or so) and seemed somehow dated... at times almost quaint. Each also offered a decidedly male perspective; not surprising from Fowles but here again, ...more
Megan
John Fowles writing intrigued me and shaped me as I read him in my teens.
Alex
Young critic, conformist and modern Visual Arts trend-caster
Is paying visit to Old School's former great but currently forgotten Master
Who lives in hide away retreat with two young girls, his followers and lovers,
In Paradise of naked realism without cheap effects and hypo-critic covers


It appears that in "The Ebony Tower" - Fowles criticizes Modernism in Art while upholding Realism ?
But if so - he, that is Fowles, apparently "changed sides" in his further works ?
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John Robert Fowles was born in Leigh-on-Sea, a small town located about 40 miles from London in the county of Essex, England. He recalls the English suburban culture of the 1930s as oppressively conformist and his family life as intensely conventional. Of his childhood, Fowles says "I have tried to escape ever since."

Fowles attended Bedford School, a large boarding school designed to prepare boys
...more
More about John Fowles...
The Magus The French Lieutenant's Woman The Collector A Maggot Daniel Martin

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