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Horizon (The Sharing Knife, #4)
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Horizon (The Sharing Knife #4)

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3.94 of 5 stars 3.94  ·  rating details  ·  4,042 ratings  ·  278 reviews
Fawn's husband Dag apprentices to a master groundsetter. But the camp has rigid mores with respect to farmers like Fawn's people. The pair must answer the question posed when they killed their first malice together: When old traditions fail, can their untried new ways win?
MP3 CD, 1 page
Published August 1st 2009 by Blackstone Audiobooks (first published 2009)
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Tadiana ✩ Night Owl☽
Eight or more years ago, I read the first book in this series, Beguilement, but never felt particularly motivated to finish the 4-book series until a few weeks ago. It occurred to me that before I let my (expensive non-resident) library card lapse for the next few months, I should grab this series off the library's shelves and plow or skim through it, as the spirit moved me.

The second book was a skimmer for me (I didn't feel qualified to rate or review it because of the amount I skipped over), b
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Kate Coombs
I figured out a long time ago that Lois McMaster Bujold is one of THOSE authors--basically, if she writes a book, it's good. Period. And the Sharing Knife books are no exception. McMaster Bujold's worlds feel real, and her characters matter. This series is a little slower paced than some of her science fiction, but they're still very rewarding reading.

Horizon is the fourth book in the Sharing Knife series, in which a farmer girl and a one-armed Lakewalker man meet while fighting a terrible monst
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Lightreads
In which this four-book romance fantasy wanders – by which I mean plot? What plot? – to a close – by which I mean babies for all!

Yikes. A friend called this the "never-ending beige adventure," which made me laugh. More than the book did.

I'm feeling kind of cranky about this book. It's intellectually boring, with a thematic conversation (communication, clashing and changing paradigms, etc.) little deeper than your average morality play. I could forgive intellectual boredom for emotional interest
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Wealhtheow
Fawn, Dag, and their never-ending beige adventure.
Tatiana
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Blodeuedd Finland
I know I know, I have been bored for 2 books now and still I read this one. I just wanted to know how it ended. But after having thought about this, it ended as boringly as it went on. Nothing happened at the end either.

Right this book then. Dag and Fawn talk --> they talk to other people --> they think about things ----> they are going north with a bunch of other people ---> more talking and thinking.
*falls asleep* Yes I actually fell asleep while reading.

Nothing happens, and when s
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MB (What she read)
1st read: This book is wonderful and with a very satisfying ending too! I have so much enjoyed the "Sharing Knife" world--it is such an interesting fantasy 'take' on a alternate frontier America.

I especially enjoy how Lois McMaster Bujold portrays a strong marriage partnership with love, respect, and caring between two strong and multi-dimensional characters. One partner's weaknesses are counteracted by the other partner's strengths and vice versa. So that the couple is stronger together than ap
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bananananas
This series could have been so much better if it was less about the romance and more about...everything else.

The malices/mud-men/mages and all the back story with the Lakewalkers and their magic and whatnot was really compelling. The world was really interesting, and a lot was made of how dangerous the north is but we never get anything except for a vague reference to the character Dag's time spent up there. The whole story with how the Lakewalkers essentially need two deaths to be shaped into
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Rebecca
So, I will endeavor to review the final book in a series without spoiling the other three.

Frankly, I'd hold up The Sharing Knife series as how to do a multi-book romance without plunging into unbelievable melodrama. The 'will they or won't they' is settled in the first book, leaving books 2-4 as a story of a young couple with a 'forbidden' relationship trying to carve a place in the world. Book 4 opens with Dag and Fawn in the south, where the problem of Lakewalkers and farmers is shown in high
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Julia
I'm not sure why I kept reading this series, since I didn't like it very much. A different series by this author (the Miles Vorkosigan series) is a funny, clever space opera with interesting characters and plots, and I had tremendous fun tearing through the whole series in a month. This series was a fantasy romance, emphasis on the romance, which would be fine if the characters were interesting. They're not, particularly. The heroine is a Mary Sue; spunky, loyal, clever, compassionate, and perfe ...more
Trin
The final volume in the Sharing Knife quartet. This is not a bad book, but I did find it to be rather a let down, especially after the previous volume, which was possibly my favorite of the series and seemed to be taking the whole thing in a new, bold, darker direction. Yet in this one, the worries that Dag might be tapping into something dark and dangerous with his powers are quickly shrugged off, and all the cool hints about the fallen civilization that the current Lakewalker/Farmer communitie ...more
Kathleen
This is supposed to be the conclusion of the Sharing Knife series, but even though it has a satisfactory ending, I really don't want to think that Bujold has told all the stories there are to tell in this world.

I loved the characters and I thought the magic system, which they explore and learn cool things about--things no one else even thought to find out (I love characters who "think outside the box"), was very clever and well-thought-out.

Bujold is a great science fiction writer, but she is als
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Lilly
First complete re-read since these books came out and my opinion of them has not changed by a lot.

The Sharing Knife Quintet is still a good series from an exceptional writer. A Slice of Life Fantasy, if I can call it that. Don't get me wrong-- There is plenty of action, but due to the length of the books [the whole series is practically just one long book] it seems not as important. It drives the plot in many places but the more important aspect of the series to me is the conflict between two d
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Hester
I have mixed feelings about this series. I HATED the first book; it struck me as an annoying romance. I trust the author, though, so I read the rest of the series and was happily surprised to see how it dealt with so many different issues.

Like the Vorkosigan series, the Sharing Knife series contains elements of Midwestern history and culture in her new world. The series is about reconciling cultures and about how the domestic interacts with the extraordinary. It is about the dynamics of power; h
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Lighthearted
Dag and Fawn continue their mission to bring Lakewalkers and farmers together. Dag also finds a Lakewalker Maker willing to train him. Predictably, Dag pushes the limits of his host Lakewalker camp and he and Fawn must travel onward in search of a home. Predictably, they also gather an assortment of characters to join their journey.

Dag and Fawn both annoy me a great deal in this installment. While I want their mission to succeed, I want it to seem less preachy and I want them to be less “perfect
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Marlee Pinsker
I really enjoyed the first three books of this series, as in falling into the book and not coming up for air. But, in this book I felt that the editor had just decided to take a break and the book was published without a proper review. So, yes, Bujold writes a good story. But a good editor would have eliminated the use of the adjective "little" to describe Dawn over and over again until she seemed like the incredible shrinking woman, and the use of the word "large" was a little too frequent for ...more
heidi
First, let me say that I am a Bujold fangirl, but not an uncritical one. I like some of the things she's done much more than I like other things. That's ok. I don't demand that a writer cater to my needs universally, or be consistently excellent (although I'd like that, of course).

The first book in this series tore at my heart because of personal connection. The last one was... boring. I suspect that I would like this series a lot better if it were two books instead of four. I can't argue with t
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Eliza Baum
This was an enjoyable conclusion to the series. Like the rest, it was really part of one long story, rather than being its own book. It added some more interesting characters--enough that, at one point, there were a good twenty secondary characters floating around. Many of the old favorites were there, too, which was nice. Despite his shaky beginnings, I really came to like Whit, and naturally Berry remained a favorite, too. Even Barr grew on me, which I completely didn't expect.

I like how you c
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K.M. Weiland
This has been a different kind of a fantasy series. Not much action (but when it’s there, it’s sizzling), and a much slower pace than most books—even most of Bujold’s books. But, at the end of the journey, it’s a delightful experience. The pioneer-esque world, the detailed magic system, and the charmingly vibrant and unique characters are lovingly crafted—and it shows in every word. This is probably my second favorite of the series, after the first one. The Third Plot Point is one of the tensest ...more
Yblees
Phew! This series really ticks all the right boxes for me.
This author has always been a great storyteller, but The Sharing Knife series was... effortless. As if the entire 4 part story had existed for a long time already, and was simply unrolling itself. Brilliant!

Wishing for more.


Chris
I wasn't as much of a fan of this one as the rest of the books in this series. As usual Bujold is best writing characters with actual depth and motivation, which is why she's the only sf/fantasy author I read regularly. However, her story lines are usually equally good, but this time it just didn't work for me. The first half of the book didn't build to any particular climax, and then boom, suddenly all hell breaks loose very quickly -- but is over just as quickly. And said hell wasn't big enoug ...more
ms bookjunkie
For me, The Sharing Knife series is incredibly emotionally satisfying. Just that, by itself, is enough to gain it a place as a comfort read on my keeper shelves. But more, the adventure, the world building and all, felt fresh to me, and I could not at any point presume to guess what would happen next. That in itself is utterly refreshing. Alright, maybe the small things could be predicted, but the big picture was a blank slate to me, and gave me that feeling I had at thirteen when I discovered D ...more
Porter
I've enjoyed this series, but I'm not sad to see it over.

There's quite a bit of a certain type of female wish-fulfilment in this series. You have Dag, an unbelievably hyper-awesome and hyper-competent older man who, because of his dark and mysterious past, has nothing to live for. Until he meets you (Fawn), the sweet young thing whose special something is enough to turn him around and redeem him.

At least it's not as bad as Twilight. I mean, I think I'd enjoy meeting both Dag and Fawn.

It's not h
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Vivian

Book 3: Passage, dealt with Dag and Fawn's journey down the rivers Grace and Grey and the experiences, good, bad, and ugly, that they have along the way. When Horizon opens, they have come to the end of their river journey, in the seaside town of Greymouth. Here Dag meets Lakewalkers of a nearby camp who are able to direct him to a medicine maker of great repute, and he is at last able to begin an apprenticeship. But the usual problem, Lakewalker non-acceptance of his farmer wife Fawn, asserts i

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John Loyd
The Sharing Knife, Volume 4: Horizon (2009) 422 pages by Lois McMaster Bujold.

The setting for the sharing knife stories is a pre-industrial society, with two distinct factions. farmers and lakewalkers. The lakewalkers have groundsense, that the farmers don't have. Their world is plagued by malices. A malice feeds off of living animals, taking their grounds, and becoming stronger. The only way to kill a malice is with a sharing knife, a femur from a dead lakewalker that is then bonded to another,
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Michelle
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Roger
SUMMARY: Dag and Fawn continue their question to bring the Lake Walkers and Farmers closer together. Dag goes to a Lake Walker camp and finds an experience "Maker" who will train him in the art of healing and in more advanced ground sense. Dag uses his skills to heal a 5 year old farmer child and is forced to leave the camp. This starts a long journey back North.

COMMENTS: Rating 4.25 rounded to 4. I've never read a book by Bujold that I didn't enjoy, and this is no exception. There is not action
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David
While the combat scenes are not as gripping as some other fantasies, the authors voice for Dag and Fawn are absolutely perfect. Dag is a voice worthy of respect, and yet he is shown not to be perfect. Fawn comes off as innocent, yet supremely grounded. It really is a very beautiful book. Highly recommended.
Dee
Hmmm. OK. Well, I've rounded to 4 stars but really it's not even quite as high as 3.5 - though once the book has settled in my mind it may edge closer to a full 4 stars. As I'd hoped and anticipated, there was definitely a faster pace and more action in this final book, a sense that maybe a solution to the world's issues of Farmer vs. Lakewalker could occur, and a nice bit of HEA for Fawn and Dag (and everyone else - I had a soft spot throughout for Whit so his HEA and heroic slaying were a happ ...more
rivka
Enjoyed the latter two books of this series even more than the first two. I particularly liked the ending (both the epilogue as a whole and the final line).
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16094
Lois McMaster Bujold was born in 1949, the daughter of an engineering professor at Ohio State University, from whom she picked up her early interest in science fiction. She now lives in Minneapolis, and has two grown children.

Her fantasy from HarperCollins includes the award-winning Chalion series and the Sharing Knife tetralogy; her science fiction from Baen Books features the perennially bestse
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More about Lois McMaster Bujold...

Other Books in the Series

The Sharing Knife (4 books)
  • Beguilement (The Sharing Knife, #1)
  • Legacy (The Sharing Knife, #2)
  • Passage (The Sharing Knife, #3)
The Curse of Chalion (Chalion, #1) Barrayar (Vorkosigan Saga, #7) The Warrior's Apprentice (Vorkosigan Saga, #2) Paladin of Souls (Chalion, #2) Shards of Honour  (Vorkosigan Saga, #1)

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