Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Some Mistakes of Moses” as Want to Read:
Some Mistakes of Moses
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Some Mistakes of Moses

4.40  ·  Rating Details  ·  234 Ratings  ·  27 Reviews
Ingersoll was widely known as the greatest orator of his time and could soundly thrash any challenger in a debate-especially in a debate on religion. His logic was impeccable and his mind was as sharp as a whip. Many religious beliefs have no logic in them at all and Ingersoll was a master at exposing the outright cruelty, stupidity and foolishness that religions, through ...more
Paperback, 280 pages
Published March 1st 2007 by Book Tree (first published 1879)
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Some Mistakes of Moses, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Some Mistakes of Moses

The God Delusion by Richard DawkinsGod Is Not Great by Christopher HitchensThe End of Faith by Sam HarrisThe Demon-Haunted World by Carl SaganLetter to a Christian Nation by Sam Harris
Notable Atheist Books
83rd out of 343 books — 829 voters
The Invention of Christianity by Alexander DrakeMisquoting Jesus by Bart D. EhrmanThe Invention of Religion by Alexander DrakeJesus, Interrupted by Bart D. EhrmanA History of God by Karen Armstrong
Understanding the Bible
110th out of 218 books — 184 voters


More lists with this book...

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 701)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  Rating Details
Skyler Myers
Jan 06, 2014 Skyler Myers rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Anyone interested in a critical look at the Bible
"For many years I have regarded the Pentateuch simply as a record of a barbarous people, in which are found a great number of the ceremonies of savagery, many absurd and unjust laws, and thousands of ideas inconsistent with known and demonstrated facts. To me it seemed almost a crime to teach that this record was written by inspired men; that slavery, polygamy, wars of conquest and extermination were right, and that there was a time when men could win the approbation of infinite Intelligence, Ju ...more
Mindi Rosser
Mar 28, 2011 Mindi Rosser rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
The Pentateuch is hailed as a foundation for modern Christianity and ancient Judaism. As a former bible-believing propagator, sundry situations in the Old (and New) Testaments plagued me. Being reared to believe the Bible without allowance for critical reasoning, I assumed that all my teachers and biblical theologians MUST have "figured it all out." It was my duty to trust their interpretation and the inspiration of these difficult passages.

Robert Ingersoll's books were off-limits to my narrow C
...more
Skyler Myers
Jan 06, 2014 Skyler Myers rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: Anyone interested in a critical look at the Bible
"For many years I have regarded the Pentateuch simply as a record of a barbarous people, in which are found a great number of the ceremonies of savagery, many absurd and unjust laws, and thousands of ideas inconsistent with known and demonstrated facts. To me it seemed almost a crime to teach that this record was written by inspired men; that slavery, polygamy, wars of conquest and extermination were right, and that there was a time when men could win the approbation of infinite Intelligence, Ju ...more
Lizmari
Apr 27, 2013 Lizmari rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
From childhood, we are taught to treat scripture with a certain air of reverence. We dare not to question, even though some may not take many of its accounts literally. We simply do not dare to venture much beyond the realm of 'symbolical,' to perhaps... outright uninformed, errant, preposterous, evil, or barbaric. We dare not question what ought to be the moral or logical choices of a God, if he so were to exist. We dare not imagine that the claims, and events of the Bible, would actually be im ...more
Jeff
Oct 14, 2012 Jeff rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
"He who endeavors to control the mind by force is a tyrant, and he who submits is a slave."

Robert Ingersoll goes through the entirety of Pentateuch with wit, humor, and precision taking the books apart piece by piece, shedding the light of reason upon its many absurdities. Pointing out mathematical impossibility after moral obscurantism, Ingersoll employs a natural, flowing prose which demonstrates why he deserved his reputation for oratory prowess. He traveled the country extensively by train a
...more
George King
Nov 18, 2013 George King rated it it was amazing
I became aware of this book through this thread, and I must say that I'm astonished that I had never been acquainted with the author or his work before. For a book written in 1879, it is remarkably contemporary, filled with wit, irony and sarcasm in its dismantling of the first 5 books of the Old Testament. His incredulous and chilling portrait of Jehovah (Yahweh) is in complete agreement with that of Dawkins in THE GOD DELUSION--but 134 years earlier! Such apostasy was probably much more common ...more
Ben Turner
Apr 22, 2016 Ben Turner rated it liked it
Before I begin with this review, I would like to mention that I am in no way in the habit of writing reviews for... really anything, much less the books I read. Additionally, I wouldn't declare myself even slightly praised for my critical reading skills. With that being said, having glossed over some of the reviews on this site, I thought the majority of them to be particularly inconsequential. There is a distinct problem with books of this nature. Polarizing opinions about the role of religion ...more
John
Apr 26, 2015 John rated it it was amazing
Really enjoyed this dissection of the first five books of the Bible. Reading in this way, I'm not sure how I ever believed. I guess its testament to the confirmation bias of ones beliefs. The contradictions of even the opening of scriptures seem so obvious when questioned; if they were inspired by a faultless being, why are there faults? Why is the meaning not clearer, why were/are things like slavery ok? If they were not inspired, but written by a man, why should we take any of it seriously?

Th
...more
Aaron Lord
Nov 04, 2013 Aaron Lord rated it it was amazing
Simply brilliant. Ingersoll eloquently lays out the arguments that ought to be apparent to anyone who hasn't been indoctrinated into these things from a very young age. In doing so, he helps point out the obvious moral deficiencies of the Pentateuch to those of us who had been blinded by faith into accepting the stories at face value. One is left thinking maybe Bishop Marcion had a point...
Heath Workman
May 11, 2014 Heath Workman rated it liked it
It is interesting to read these 19th century critiques of religion. There are many scientific objections to the bible that Ingersoll raises that are based on faulty information but I admire his tenacity and willingness to question. However, he raises many moral objections that are just as applicable today as they were the day he made them.

I was amused to see in his critique of biblical polygamy references to Mormon polygamy in Utah, a faith I was raised in. Arguing against polygamy he states, "
...more
Joy
Jun 17, 2015 Joy rated it it was amazing
Shelves: freethinker
I found this book most edifying. In addition to the logical discussion of the illogical in the OLD TESTAMENT, the simple explanation of what exactly is written as the word of God was very illuminating. As a former Catholic school pupil, my religious education consisted mainly of the parables and miracles in the NEW TESTAMENT and the Baltimore Catechism. The OLD TESTAMENT was just Bible stories and they were glossed over. With good reason, I now see. If I were to enter some quotations, I'd have t ...more
Adam Morva
Dec 31, 2015 Adam Morva rated it really liked it
I read all of Ingersoll's writing and speeches over the course of a few days, so I can't really remember the books apart: I will treat them all as one big entity.

Ingersoll was a magnificent man ahead of his time. Not really because he had the intellectual horsepower to successfully evaluate the truth value of religious claims - since, let's admit it, an intelligent child has enough brain cells to do that -, but because he had the intellectual courage not only to make these evaluations, but also
...more
Fiver
Sep 09, 2011 Fiver rated it liked it
When I was very little, I had a general idea, based on my television-watching experience, that sex, drugs, and violence weren't really invented until sometime in the sixties. Part of growing up, for me, was the staunch realization that these things existed even before it became common to publish books about them. Similarly, I often meet people who seem to think that before our century, just about everyone in the world was Christian. Enter Mr. Ingersoll.


What makes "Some Mistakes of Moses" so impr
...more
Ana Mardoll
Mar 05, 2011 Ana Mardoll rated it it was amazing
Shelves: ana-reviewed
Some Mistakes of Moses / 978-1-58509-060-0

It is difficult to remember that Robert Ingersoll wrote this eloquent argument over a hundred years ago; his impassioned arguments seem so relevant today that it's hard to believe how little has changed since then. Within his logical and cold commentary of the contradictions and problems within the Pentateuch, Ingersoll also sets forth the arguments that:

* the clergy is held perpetually hostage to the traditions and beliefs of the past, for it is always
...more
Aaron Schiffer
Dec 31, 2010 Aaron Schiffer rated it really liked it
Picked this up after watching the series by YouTube user Evid3nc3, on how he became an atheist. Specifically video 3.3.1, entitled "Scholars, Ingersoll and Mack." http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U6MWo_...

The book itself was pretty comprehensive in its Samuel Clemens-style satirical treatment of the books of Moses. Although I suppose it was more serious than Twain would have been. Ingersoll himself promoted the contemporary movement of Freethought, which supported free inquiry and higher criticism
...more
Gilbert
Jan 08, 2016 Gilbert rated it really liked it
Mostly good. Some things are awkwardly 19th century with mentions of savages and the like, and going on about "obscenities".
Daniel
Feb 13, 2016 Daniel rated it it was amazing
Simultaneously humorous and thought provoking.
Taylor Lee
Apr 19, 2016 Taylor Lee rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This should be required reading.
Cindi
Jul 08, 2011 Cindi rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: religion, history, 2011
This is a quick read. I'm almost done.

Ingersoll is irreverent. He's also pretty funny. This isn't laugh out loud, guffaw, funny. It's just quiet little twittering funny. Surprisingly for his agnostic views, he does still provide alternate historical ideas for some of the, in his view, outlandish Biblical stories. How many times can those Egyptian cattle be killed???
Evan Johanson
Jul 15, 2013 Evan Johanson rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Fantastic! Simplistic in execution. The seemingly child-like questions peppered throughout the book were some of the very ones i had ruminated upon that led to my skepticism of the religion I once held so dear.
Ewa
Mar 31, 2011 Ewa rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Everyone!
This book is amazing! Ingersoll makes so many good points! I couldn't agree with him more.

I wish this book was as well known as books written by Richard Dawkins, Christopher Hitchens or Sam Harris.

Jascollins
Feb 08, 2014 Jascollins rated it really liked it
A few of the apologetics he dismantles are rarely used anymore, and it feels a bit slow in those parts, but overall his wit shines through and will have you nodding and remarking aloud.
At Fourie
A must read!! Especially all conservative Christians who really do not know what the Bible is all about.
Kyle Giesbrecht
Jul 06, 2012 Kyle Giesbrecht rated it it was amazing
With all the current religious idealism nowadays, it's hard to believe this book was written in 1879.
Jeremiah Riley
A very funny and very logical dismantaling of the first five books of the old testament.
Jason
Sep 27, 2010 Jason rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
worth a read.

I'm amazed that this was written in the 1800s.

Josh
Josh marked it as to-read
Apr 25, 2016
Charles Warner
Charles Warner marked it as to-read
Apr 24, 2016
Maryam Mushtaq
Maryam Mushtaq rated it it was amazing
Apr 24, 2016
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 23 24 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
  • Sense and Goodness Without God: A Defense of Metaphysical Naturalism
  • The Christian Delusion: Why Faith Fails
  • The Incredible Shrinking Son of Man: How Reliable Is the Gospel Tradition?
  • The Born Again Skeptic's Guide To The Bible
  • 50 Reasons People Give for Believing in a God
  • Who Wrote the New Testament? The Making of the Christian Myth
  • The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Christian Myth
  • The Secret Origins Of The Bible
  • Losing Faith in Faith: From Preacher to Atheist
  • God and the Folly of Faith: The Incompatibility of Science and Religion
  • The Bible with Sources Revealed
  • Atheism: The Case Against God
  • The Bible Unearthed: Archaeology's New Vision of Ancient Israel and the Origin of Its Sacred Texts
  • An Encyclopedia of Claims, Frauds, and Hoaxes of the Occult and Supernatural
  • What the Koran Really Says
  • Why Are You Atheists So Angry? 99 Things That Piss Off the Godless
  • 2000 Years of Disbelief
  • Meditations for the Humanist: Ethics for a Secular Age
156323
"On August 11, 1833, was born the greatest and noblest of the Western World; an immense personality, -- unique, lovable, sublime; the peerless orator of all time, and as true a poet as Nature ever held in tender clasp upon her loving breast, and, in words coined for the chosen few, told of the joys and sorrows, hopes, dreams, and fears of universal life; a patriot whose golden words and deathless ...more
More about Robert G. Ingersoll...

Share This Book



“To hate man and worship God seems to be the sum of all the creeds.” 139 likes
“And why does this same God tell me how to raise my children when he had to drown his?” 54 likes
More quotes…