Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Eclipse of God: Studies in the Relation Between Religion and Philosophy” as Want to Read:
Eclipse of God: Studies in the Relation Between Religion and Philosophy
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Eclipse of God: Studies in the Relation Between Religion and Philosophy

4.02  ·  Rating Details ·  84 Ratings  ·  9 Reviews
s/t: A Critique of the Key 20th Century Philosophies: Existentialism, Crisis Theology, Jungian Psychology
The condition Buber calls the "eclipse of God" is the reality that modern life & the teachings of many scholars have in many ways destroyed the opportunity for intimacy with an eternal, ever-present, Thou, or God. Based in part on a series of lectures he gave in the
...more
Paperback, 160 pages
Published 1957 by Harper & Row (NY)
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Eclipse of God, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Eclipse of God

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  Rating Details
Ben Triplett
Aug 12, 2012 Ben Triplett rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Those versed in Modern philosophy will enjoy a non-traditional critique of the Moderns and proto-postmoderns. Buber criticizes Modern thinkers for building false images of God, while standing outside of Religion itself. Buber also offers insight into his already established I-Thou/I-It rhetoric. I especially enjoyed his interpretation of "God is dead" as "God is silent". This book might be confusing to readers not familiar with mystical, Kierkegaardian, or Judeo-Christian categories.
Michael
Mar 28, 2016 Michael rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Dense but intelligible. Though it was clear that the ultimate significance of the "I-Thou" relationship was religious, in Buber's classic introduction of that theory, he studiously avoided making the connection in full. Here he does. Along the way he mercilessly chews out Sartre and especially Jung for their Sophistic relativism while taking a surprisingly understanding view of Nietzsche and Heidegger when they accept that Good is dead yet seek some kind of replacement. The discussion of ethics ...more
Bob Woodley
Jan 05, 2015 Bob Woodley rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A good collection of essays by this Jewish philosopher from the early 20th century. He critiques a wide variety of contemporary (to him) philosophers: Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Jung, Heidegger, Sartre.

I enjoy these kind of critiques because an adversarial perspective is so much more contextual than a historical or biographical treatment.

His seminal text 'I and Thou' is not included but would be a prerequisite as it underpins everything he writes.

My favorite essay was 'Religion and Ethics'. Relig
...more
John Melvin
Jan 29, 2016 John Melvin rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Excellent

This should be a classic among books about theism. Great companion to his better-known masterpiece of humanism I and Thou.
Shai Stern
Shai Stern rated it really liked it
Mar 03, 2013
Tim Kellebrew
Tim Kellebrew rated it it was amazing
Feb 23, 2012
Narguess Sabetti
Jul 30, 2016 Narguess Sabetti rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Not a perfect one although. But necessary to be read.
Giacomo
Giacomo rated it really liked it
Dec 05, 2011
Calin
Calin rated it really liked it
Jan 11, 2008
Jeffrey Gusfield
Jeffrey Gusfield rated it it was amazing
Feb 25, 2012
Storm
Storm rated it liked it
Sep 18, 2012
Crimson
Crimson rated it it was amazing
Dec 01, 2016
Gkc3of9
Gkc3of9 rated it it was ok
Jan 29, 2015
Jeff
Jeff rated it it was ok
May 12, 2013
Scott
Scott rated it really liked it
Aug 14, 2012
Craig Atwood
Craig Atwood rated it it was amazing
Jan 19, 2015
Marc
Marc rated it liked it
Feb 19, 2013
Brad
Brad rated it liked it
Mar 09, 2010
Adam Gossman
Adam Gossman rated it really liked it
Oct 09, 2013
Guy
Guy rated it it was amazing
May 05, 2013
Marlin Harrison
Marlin Harrison rated it really liked it
Jun 30, 2013
No_doubt
No_doubt rated it it was amazing
May 01, 2012
Juan Manuel
Juan Manuel rated it liked it
Mar 20, 2016
Ştefan Bolea
Ştefan Bolea rated it it was ok
Jul 24, 2014
Jacob Russell
Jacob Russell rated it really liked it
Apr 29, 2010
Marissa
Marissa rated it liked it
Aug 11, 2010
Jared Balavender
Jared Balavender rated it liked it
Apr 05, 2013
Matt
Feb 13, 2008 Matt rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: philosophy, religion
I did not get a lot out of this one
Gabriel Milstein
Gabriel Milstein rated it really liked it
Mar 26, 2016
« previous 1 3 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
  • Man Is Not Alone: A Philosophy of Religion
  • Yoga: Immortality and Freedom
  • The Idea of the Holy
  • Ideas and Integrities: A Spontaneous Autobiographical Disclosure
  • Mysticism: Christian and Buddhist
  • Practical Mysticism
  • The Cambridge Companion to Nietzsche
  • The Needs Of Strangers
  • The Affirmation of Life: Nietzsche on Overcoming Nihilism
  • Morality: An Introduction to Ethics
  • The Younger Evangelicals
  • Philosophy of Religion
  • Ethical Ambition: Living a Life of Meaning and Worth
  • Calvinism in the Las Vegas Airport: Making Connections in Today's World
  • فلسفة الإرادة، الإنسان الخطاء
  • The Prince and The Discourses
  • Ethics and Infinity: Conversations with Philippe Nemo
  • On Belief
29357
Martin Buber was an Austrian-born Jewish philosopher best known for his philosophy of dialogue, a religious existentialism centered on the distinction between the I-Thou relationship and the I-It relationship.

Buber came from a family of observant Jews, but broke with Jewish custom to pursue secular studies in philosophy. In 1902, Buber became the editor of the weekly Die Welt, the central organ of
...more
More about Martin Buber...

Share This Book



No trivia or quizzes yet. Add some now »