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Infinity in the Presocratics: A Bibliographical and Philosophical Study
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Infinity in the Presocratics: A Bibliographical and Philosophical Study

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3.0 of 5 stars 3.00  ·  rating details  ·  2 ratings  ·  2 reviews
Abbreviations
Permissions
Foreword
Introduction
Methodology & Acknowledgements
Secondary Literature on Anaximander
Anaximander & Other Ionians
Pythagoras
The Eleatics
Post-Parmenidean Philosophers
In Retrospect
Appendix: Additional Studies on Anaximander
Bibliography
Index of Topics
Index of Passages
Index of Names
Paperback, 1st, 255 pages
Published July 31st 1972 by Martinus Nijhoff (The Hague) (first published January 1st 1972)
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Peter Mcloughlin
This book is a little dry and written in academic prose (not a good thing) but it introduces the earliest thinking on the infinite by the Pre-Socratics. Infinity has vexed philosophers since this early period of Greek philosophy. The Greeks had a negative view of the infinite which was called Apeiron which translates as a combination of boundless and chaos. Discussions of the infinite start with Anaximander and proceed to Zeno of Elea who made his famous paradoxes involving Achilles and the tort ...more
Erik Graff
Nov 24, 2013 Erik Graff rated it 3 of 5 stars
Recommends it for: Presocratic fans
Recommended to Erik by: Leo Sweeney
Shelves: philosophy
I read this for Sweeney's course on Plato taken during my first semester at Loyola University Chicago. All that remains outstanding about it now is his discussion of the Greek phrase 'ta apeiron', often translated as 'the infinite' but meaning more something like 'the indefinite'.

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