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2666 Part B (2666 #4-5)

4.22 of 5 stars 4.22  ·  rating details  ·  632 ratings  ·  65 reviews
Composed in the last years of Roberto Bolaño's life, 2666 was greeted across Europe and Latin America as his highest achievement, surpassing even his previous work in its strangeness, beauty, and scope. Its throng of unforgettable characters includes academics and convicts, an American sportswriter, an elusive German novelist, and a teenage student and her widowed, mentall ...more
Audio, 9 pages
Published July 1st 2009 by Blackstone Audiobooks (first published 2008)
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(showing 1-30 of 1,724)
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Risa
Dec 22, 2009 Risa is currently reading it
having read less than the first 100 pages of an 893 page book i can only say that I will be truly, truly sad when this book ends. it is a marvelous epic but with a very tight focus; it is robust without being verbose. each and every page of this book is another kind of love affair with language with wonderful rhythms and motifs= nice translation.

A really interesting kind of writing, not like Borges "interesting" but it's as if he has technically mastered the act of writing and having done that,
...more
Andrea
I think the best way to describe this book is epic. It was epic. The writing, the stories, even getting through each page was epic and it was an endeavor. There is no straight forward plot line, the book (books) are filled with vinettes that related to an overall story and sometimes don't, but the finished product is absolutely beautiful. Almost every page contains an incredible quote, but in order to get through this book, you have to want to read it.
Erin
Mar 26, 2010 Erin added it
considering someone asked me for my number when I was perusing this book in portland I figured it had to be good. I dont know why bram sent it to me here though I get enough marriage proposals without people being attracted to my literary choices. I've read the first 2 books so far have been flying throught- unfortunately it was too heavy to bike 70k so I had to take a quick break from it.
Dan Pope
Can you give a book six stars?
Neil Crossan
Jul 22, 2013 Neil Crossan rated it 2 of 5 stars
Recommended to Neil by: New York Times
Literary meandering at its most grandiose. Majestic in its non-rising, non-declining plot.

I’m sure there are literary scholars that can find common threads through the 5 parts and 900 pages, but I already have a full time job and the last I checked reading this book wasn’t paying my heath care premiums. I don’t mind a challenge, but you have to help me out a little bit. How many characters are in this book? 15,000? And I curse those authors who give characters similar names. Bolano took it to a
...more
T.
Mar 29, 2011 T. rated it 4 of 5 stars
Shelves: fiction
This is an incredible book. It was well worth the enormity. It falls between a 4 and 5 for me for reasons I'm still thinking about. Questions: should the five sections/chapters have been published together as one book? Were the revisions completed posthumously, sound? The entire book's chapters seems so well wrought, so wound--even in their lack of closure, their mystery. But the last chapter/book...it doesn't feel as tightly woven.

Is this the manifesto? I think so.

"The style was strange. The w
...more
Michael Mclaughlin
Well it took me long enough, but I finally finished this book. It was rich in images and language but sometimes short on plot, but I could not imagine not finishing this one. Though it circles around the search for a German author and serial killings in a North Mexican border city, this book is all about its characters and their stories. If you're looking for tidy closures, like in life, you won't find them. Instead, characters' lives come and go throughout the 5 sections of this book and as in ...more
Conrad
Well, understanding that this book was published posthumously, and understanding that this book was, by the author's admission, un-finished, and understanding that the narrator was Arturo Bolano (one of the protagonists in The Savage Detectives), it was just a very good read, albeit 890 or so pages of a good read. I wonder if the author didn't connect the dots because death intervened, or because he wanted to make it that way on purpose? I intend to read more of his works.
Ubu
Uno dei romanzi più interessanti letti ultimamente. E il bello è che non so spiegare bene perché. La verità è che appena finito il secondo volume, m'è venuta voglia di ricominciare col primo.

Nota a latere: Boo! alla Adelphi che ha deciso di pubblicarlo diviso così, quando in tutto il mondo si vede la versione in un volume unico, che ha molto più senso.

Cliff
Having just finished...I'm not sure what to say. I didn't realize that this 'book' (Like calling the OED a 'book') actually shares characters with Savage Detectives. Also, a tip, take notes. The 'Crimes' section 4 kind of ends up wiping out all that came before.
Spencer Janyk
This book was a slog at times, but it's a marvelous and engaging read if you're excited about your own madness and depression.

Bolaño himself seems mad, weaving stories that are connected to one another by confusion, fear, frustration and sexual violence.

It's a "macho" book—the reader is invited to celebrate men's sexual violence and capacity for masochism (embodied in the form of a redeemed banality of Naziism), but an immense catalog of brutal rapes and murders also numbs you to the supposed th
...more
Garland Fielder
What starts out as an academic version of a noir gradually steamrolls into a macabre test of endurance cataloging the ongoing murders in Jaurez. Oddly readable, and somehow personal. A fine trick to pull off.
Axel Shut
Quello che attira ne “La parte dei delitti” è la sensazione (poi disattesa) che la soluzione arriverà, dista solo poche pagine, non è possibile che non ci sia, non dopo tutto l’elenco sterminato e glaciale che Bolaño redige come se fosse un entomologo. Metaforicamente si potrebbe dire che in realtà la soluzione o la risposta c’è ed è la Letteratura ma non mi convince. Tutto “2666” e soprattutto “La parte dei delitti” tratta proprio dell’incontro con l’Inconoscibile e del fatto che non si potrann ...more
Maria
This volume contains a series of five related novels based around the brutal rape and murder of hundreds of women & girls in the area around a fictional Santa Theresa, Mexico (mirroring a similar situation near the real Ciudad Juarez) in the late 1980's and 90's. Through the stories, different people become involved in trying to figure out who is committing the crimes. The book begins with scholars who become enamoured with an obscure writer and moves through detectives, employees of the nar ...more
Fawzy
My Bible.
Leka

5.9 La parte dei delitti
(senza indicazione di stelle, il cielo è troppo cupo per vederne qualcuna)

Bene, sono finalmente arrivata alla fine, non illesa, ma alla fine.
Pensare che, tra le invenzioni, c'è anche parte di verità, mi fa accapponare la pelle. Non mi sono fermata -disgustata- solo per una sorta di omaggio alle vittime. Alle donne, vittime, che comunque non ne avranno nessun beneficio...

9.9 La parte di Arcimboldi****

Ecco, questa è l'ultima parte del libro, ma cronologicamente quella che
...more
Danny
It was over two years ago when I ran to a Barnes and Noble to see if they were selling this book that was being urgently applauded in the NYT Review of Books. They say an educated person gets the chance to read five books a year. How many of those will be contemporary? This was new because Americans were just finding out about it, and falling in love with it. But the voice didn't sound like any kind of new thing I knew.

The voice that opens up the strange journey of 2666 is old, dead sounding.
...more
D.S.
2666 is many things -- a literary game, a demonstration of how language can capture a place and a time, and a variety of other things that will interest those of us who like to think about our books. But it is much, much more than that -- it is a angry, almost impossibly intense look at the effect of the drug war on Mexico and the violence perpetrated against women every day. It is a poetic look at people who want to be saved by literature, but who must instead face the burdens of real life. It ...more
Eric
If I had to chop off a third (roughly) of any book that I love in order for me to love it as a whole, then I could never truly love that book. With that said--and I'm sure everyone knows the 3rd that I am referring to--I don't love this book as a sum of it's many moving but sometimes blantantly still parts. If you're writing a long or short book then it damn'near better knock my socks off. There were very deep and poignant parts of this book that I fell into easily but also long stretches of.... ...more
Oscar
I have read some thick, dense books in my life, but this one has supplanted them all. I have to say that most of it was beautifully written, which is why it received 4 stars. If you dont know, this book was written in five parts and was originally intended to be released separately...3 and a half parts I loved, the other one and a half, was just alright. Still well written, but because it was so time consuming to get through, as a basic story, it could of done without. But that's the thing, it i ...more
Daniel
Took me about ten days total of reading to finish this 900-page masterpiece. And I never ever read that fast. Except for the time I read Bolaño's Savage Detectives in less than a week. Maybe that's saying something. His writing has an indescribable quality about it - it transports you to the settings he describes, from the Sonoran desert and its grisly scenes to the cold realities of a WW2 warzone in the Carpathians. Each section of the book is brilliant in its own ways, and it was a worthy choi ...more
Justin Kahler
I loved Savage Detectives and I really liked the first section of 2666. But as a whole I was disappointed. The end didnt have a payoff that warranted the structure of the book. I'm ultimately left thinking this book was unfinished when Belano died.
Fran
Very unusual book written in five parts, with different themes and characters. I enjoyed it and was surprised how the author tied it together at the end. It's very long, but I read it over several months, reading each part on its own.
Marian
Wow. Just WOW. This book was one hell of an undertaking! It is broken out into five parts but contained about a million short stories in between. The main stories in each of the five parts all link together in some way that is not always obvious at first. I was just happy that the last part brought together a lot of loose ends.

Be warned that the longest part, "The Part about the Crimes", is extremely disturbing and graphic. I want to say I liked the last part best, but perhaps that was because
...more
Nathan
A lot of people told me that Savage Detectives is the best Bolano book to start with but I choose this one instead because the plot seemed more interesting and I was on a mega-novel kick. It has some very difficult, bordering on masochistic, parts to read like a 200 page crime report on serial murders and it definitely is a big baggy as most thousand page novels are but it also has more awesome little knolls of prose than any other Bolano book I've read and the plot actually comes amazingly clos ...more
Roxy Reno
So, I'm pretty convinced one should wear a crash helmet when taking on a Bolano title, chin strap buckled. Such was the case for 2666 anyway. Fucking magnificent! It's 900 pages so I brought it everywhere and ended up reading the bulk of it between periods of the NHL playoffs, kind of a perfect fit. Part history lesson, part news report, part novel, a mélange of things all rolled into one big beautiful book. It's the closest thing to David Foster Wallace that I've run across and I don't say that ...more
Tomaž
2666 je resno in zoprno, a hkrati tudi hecno in strastno branje, ob katerem sem tudi sam izgubljal živce in užival v polnosti. Čeprav sem se večkrat zalotil pri misli, da pravzaprav berem zapiske, ki morajo še prestati urednikovanje in izločanje tega, kar ne sodi v roman, se je Bolaño izkazal kot vrhunski pisatelj. Verjamem pa tudi, da tisti, ki boste 2666 pregrizli, tega ne boste obžalovali. 2666 in njegov monstruozni stil je zasnovan tako, da v glavah odzvanja naprej. In prav je, da ima zadnji ...more
Abbie Navarrete
I tried reading this book but could not finish and its not that it is a massively long book but that the writing is so cumbersome. The author before he died asked that the book be published in five parts but the editors decided against it. But even within the five parts of the book there are other parts that at the end are unnecessary. I wanted so desperately to finish this book and I am not one to ever not do so but I just could not engage with the characters because you forget them in the mids ...more
Uttiya Roy
Could I say anything about this?
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For most of his early adulthood, Bolaño was a vagabond, living at one time or another in Chile, Mexico, El Salvador, France and Spain.

Bolaño moved to Europe in 1977, and finally made his way to Spain, where he married and settled on the Mediterranean coast near Barcelona, working as a dishwasher, a campground custodian, bellhop and garbage collector — working during the day and writing at night.

H
...more
More about Roberto Bolaño...

Other Books in the Series

2666 (8 books)
  • 2666
  • 2666, Part 1: The Part About The Critics
  • 2666, Part 2: The Part About Amalfitano
  • 2666, Part 3: The Part About Fate
  • 2666, Part 4: The Part About The Crimes
  • 2666, Part 5: The Part About Archimboldi
  • 2666 - I. La parte dei critici - ­La parte di Amalfitano­ - La parte di Fate
The Savage Detectives 2666 By Night in Chile Distant Star Last Evenings on Earth

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