Jack of Fables, Vol. 6: The Big Book of War (Jack of Fables #6)
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Jack of Fables, Vol. 6: The Big Book of War (Jack of Fables (Collected) #6)

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3.45 of 5 stars 3.45  ·  rating details  ·  1,358 ratings  ·  68 reviews
When Bookburner's army attacks Revise's compound, Jack returns not as a prisoner but as Commander-in-Chief. In this new title collecting issues #28-32 of Jack's monthly series, secrets are revealed, including the strange relationships between Jack and the Page sisters.
Paperback, 128 pages
Published October 20th 2009 by Vertigo
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(showing 1-30 of 1,972)
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Nicola Mansfield
Reason for Reading: next in the series.

I have to say I have really been looking forward to reading this volume simply because it means I can get back to the original Fables series now with the big crossover issue that continues on with the storyline started here. I've enjoyed Jack and will continue to read the series especially since I've inadvertently found out how the plot line changes in the next volume. I still do prefer Fables as a whole though to Jack of...

This Volume finally brings closur...more
Anna Rohwedder
This book is, as the name suggest, a big war story. All the major events in Jack of Fables lead to this point (aside from bonus stories and flashbacks), a long epic battle featuring almost every character in the series so far. Being a huge fan of war tales, fiction or not, I was really looking forward to this volume. Unfortunately, I found this to be the weakest Jack book so far.

While still engaging in parts and with funny moments, the story seems rushed at times, jumping over some plot elements...more
David Caldwell
The sixth collection of the Jack of Fables series contains issues 28 to 32.

The Bookburner has brought his forces to take over the Golden Boughs Retirement Community from Revise. If he succeeds, he will be able to get all of the original volumes of the Fables stories. Then he could force all of the Fables to be under his command.

The Literals story line continues to progress with more information coming out and connecting the Fables and the Literals. The Jack stories also continue to become sillie...more
Jordan
Jack is at it again! The Bookburner and his army have reached the walls of the Golden Boughs retirement community, and the time for war has come! This time, though, Jack gets to be the commander. Uh...it seemed like a good idea to Gary, anyway. Of course everything changes, given Willingham's attitude towards the status quo, and we get some truly huge revelations here. For one thing, the original versions of a number of the Fables you thought you knew were very different. The Tin Man was a war m...more
Razvan Zamfirescu
I-am dat patru stele pentru datorita graficii si pentru ca povestea, de aceasta data, nu are nicio sincopa in actiune.
Nici nu a fost foarte greu sa se intample asta pentru ca, pana la urma, a fost vorba despre redare conflictului dintre Book Burner si Revise. Desi Jack nu prea este prezent iar poantele sale sunt cam slabute, sfarsitul volumului ii este dedicat si prezenta personalitatii sale ciufute se face simtita cat pentru toate cele 4 numere care sunt continute in The Big Book of War.
Mie mi-...more
Jeff Raymond
As I continue to catch up with Jack in order to be able to get back in line with Fables, I can say two things about this arc:

1) This was quick and engaging enough for me to finish in one sitting.

2) This had very little actually happening except to really set up the crossover event in the next arc.

So, all things being equal, it was...okay. I keep hoping that this series hits the high notes that what it spun off from has shown itself capable of, but it always seems to fall flat.
PurplyCookie
The Siege of the Golden Boughs occurs in which Bookburner's army attacks Revise's compound. Jack returns not as a prisoner but as its Commander-in-chief, due to the Pathetic Fallacy's persuasive powers exerted on his grandson. The Bookburner reveals who composes his Eidolon army--a Greek concept of a shade or astral double of a living being--at the same time Priscilla Page has betrayed Revise by letting Kevin Thorn claim what may be the most dangerous object/weapon against all Fablekind: his pen...more
Delicious Strawberry
This is a really exciting installment in the world of the Fables. I was glad to finally learn of Prose Page and a bit more about the Literals, though I'm surprised Prose died at all. I mean, it seems that after a few thousand years (and a few kids) she would have been better able to handle her youngest daughter's birth, and the fact that she lived long enough afterward to tell Revise her secret confuses me a bit more. The story of Prose could have been handled better - if she had been killed by...more
Melissa Sodano
How can it be that the volume revolving around war made me laugh harder than all of the others? Perhaps it's because the war is just a secondary action to the family drama unfolding between Jack, the Page sisters, and the other Literals. Family drama, you say? Yes, I won't give anything away, but if you've already read The Great Fable Crossover, you can put two and two together.

Now, in the meantime, Jack seizes power of the fables from Mr. Revise, which quite frankly, isn't too hard as he's impr...more
RØB
Wow, you don't read a JACK OF FABLES trade paperback for six months and all of a sudden there are three more available at the library already! JACK OF FABLES is another reliably-entertaining title in the realm of graphic literature. Really my problem with recounting my exact feelings on graphic novels is similar to my problem with TV shows--I just wanna experience it all at once, but if it isn't all released yet, as with JACK OF FABLES, FABLES, THE WALKING DEAD, et al, I have to wait before gobb...more
Jeff
After the lackluster Volume 5 of Jack of Fables, it was nice to get back to the (at least more) loveable scoundrel Jack. He, Gary, and the Page sisters must help Mr. Revise defend the Golden Boughs from the Book Burner's army of lost Fables. Jack uses his silver tongue to position himself into the role of Commander and Chief of the Golden Boughs forces, but as one could expect, is not necessarily the ideal candidate for the job. Gary finally gets to cut lose and we see how truly powerful the Pat...more
Izlinda
I'm not a big fan of Jack of Fables as I am of Fables. However, I was intent on reading this volume as the gap between Fables 5 and the Crossover Fables volume coming out next year. (Cannot wait!) Having Jack suddenly appear at the end of Fables 12 made me more intent on reading this volume. What had happened between Jack and the Literals or the Bookburner?

This volume was big on revelations, about the fables and about Jack's parentage. Some of the narrating, in Jack's voice, was a bit annoying....more
Heidi Wiechert
There are some shocking revelations in here and a war. Strangely enough, the Babe the Blue Ox panels fall flat in this one. Those were my favorite parts of the other books. The Library fights back in this issue and Fables literally "read for their lives!"

Now to read the Fables Crossover book...
Anna
Issue 28 - I guess this is the beginning of a war arc. Not too spectacular of a beginning, but I have faith it'll get somewhere.

Issue 29 - I really liked the guys with the scissor fingers. And the ending was a pretty good. Can't wait to see where it goes!

Issue 30 - Ooooh, that was a good issue. Excellent cliffhanger and excellent turn of events.

Issue 31 - Certainly not what I expected to happen...but I am certainly very curious about the three Native American beings at the end of the issue...

Iss...more
Sue
after waiting to get the next books in the series in, the cliff hanger of the war was finally resolved. not sure if i loved the resolution, but as always the stories are imaginative and intriguing. babe doesn't seem quite as funny as he originally was though.
zxvasdf
Every General knows to delegate and take credit for it when the battle is won. Jack is no exception. The Fables and Literals battle the Bookburner's eidolons. AS always the writing duo is superb, with the hilarious intermissions of Babe the Blue Ox's rambling speculations in which the punch line comes after a pause.

The ending is a real surprise, and I thought the previous book was suprising...

I really love the idea of Literals. They are literary techniques made flesh, and the Jack of FAbles boo...more
Jeffrey
Bill Willingham's first Jack of Fables arc comes to a close as the battle of Golden Boughs rages. While Jack does succeed in rallying the troops, you can expect that ultimate victory will not come because of, but in spite of, his efforts.

Babe's vignettes remains the highlight and Jack remains annoyingly self-absorbed. The big reveal at the end(view spoiler) is actually disconcerting as it provides the opportunity to exacerbate his worst qualities...more
Busky3
It's got a lot of action but the character motivations are murky at best. It's never super clear why one character wants to wipe out the stories of all the Fables save maybe that his name is friggen Bookburner.
John


Bazinga! If only the climactic battle in Fables' War and Pieces could have been this much fun! From Jack playing Patton to even more back story on the Literals to a great battle in which the end really was in doubt (somewhat), this was good times. Willingham's inability to choose epic over metaphor and sarcasm is much better served in Jack of Fables than the mother book, and is storyline shows exactly why. Since Fables has proven its incapable of being truly great, despite it's potential, maybe...more
Matt Anderson
This was one of my favorite volumes of "Jack of Fables" so far! Possibly my favorite. When I picked it up to read for the first time, I planned to only read one or two of the "chapters," but I was sucked into the story immediately. The ending is shocking...so shocking that I'm not going to spoil it here. But I will say this; I rarely make "out loud" sounds when I'm reading, however I gasped and said "No way!" as I finished this volume. There were also some great reveals concerning the Literals,...more
Otherwyrld
Jack, Mr Revise and the Fables of the retirement home go to war against the Bookburner. Mr Revise gives his inmates back their old powers and the story is saved by a literal deus ex machina.

For some reason the front cover makes Jack look like Christopher Fowler (no idea why)

Oh, and Jack finds out thet not only is he half Fable and half Literal (you would need to read the story to find out what this means), but he has had sex with all 3 of his half-sisters. Strangely enough, they are more distur...more
Robert Hudder
A war farce. Jack steps up to the plate and guides? the war effort to try and defeat a Literal.
Alan
I was very pleasantly surprised by this volume. The Jack tales have not been as strong as Fables, probably because Bill Willingham co-authors the Jack tales whereas he writes Fables by himself. In this installment we learn more about the literals, Revise, and Bookburner. Yes, there is a war, but the war gives a whole new meaning to the word fist edition to me. Also, it makes me wonder how much our fables and fairy tales have been edited, neutered if you, over the decades. And, we find out more a...more
Shannon
Meh...don't have much to say about this. It wasn't all that good, but it was at least better than the previous volume. The standoff between the Fables and the Bookburner wasn't too exciting until Gary stepped in. I loved the art during that part. Babe the ox was more tolerable though I still don't find the joke too funny. The only good part in this was when Jack found out something about himself towards the end. It was both funny and kind of gross considering the circumstances.
Doreen
Just last volume, I was complaining about the lack of evenness in quality from collection to collection. But this trade broke that curse, presenting a coherent, cohesive narrative in the lead up to the Great Fables Crossover. The reaction to the story of Jack's parentage was particularly classic.

And I must say, I do enjoy sitting with these and Fables comics in front of my computer, Googling a/o Wikiing the references. Bill Willingham is so clever it boggles my mind. Good stuff.
E.C.R.
This series feels like it is just going through the motions at this point. The title character is exactly the same as he has been in the past few volumes and I'm getting a bit tired of his shtick. Likewise, the supporting characters never really show much development. This volume ends with a Deus ex Machina (who I'm surprised isn't a regular character at this point), which ended a major storyline in a completely uninteresting way. The art is good throughout and as always.
Todd
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Rich Barrett
It's been a while since I read one of these and I forgot how funny the series is. Even with an obnoxious, self-centered jerk as a main character the book just works on the strength of its supporting cast and its irreverent humor. I will say the ongoing shtick with Babe the Blue Ox which I once found hilarious has really overstayed its welcome now. It will be nice to see this book start to move into new directions after the big Fable Crossover next.
MIchael
Jack...other than Babe's one page interludes per issue...has been lacking for me lately. I haven't been into the whole Bookburner storyline. But this story actually does a good job of wrapping all that up, giving a lot of Jack being Jack, introducing further the concept of The Literals (just in time for the great fables crossover) and even delivering some truely disturbing and hilarious consequences to some of Jack's more amorous actions.
Drucilla
So Jack is back to his regular levels of douchiness, which is good. Since the build up for the Fables war with the Adversary was so long, this battle seemed like it was over in a flash (and I guess it kind of was). Then again, now I'm pretty sure that the Bookburner's battle wasn't climax of the series so it makes sense. I'm definitely looking forward to the next volume, though. The set up is pretty cool.
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In the late 1970s to early 1980s he drew fantasy ink pictures for the Dungeons & Dragons Basic and Expert game rulebooks. He first gained attention for his 1980s comic book series Elementals published by Comico, which he both wrote and drew. However, for reasons unknown, the series had trouble maintaining an original schedule, and Willingham's position in the industry remained spotty for many...more
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