Degrees of Knowledge: Collected Works Jacques Maritain V7
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Degrees of Knowledge: Collected Works Jacques Maritain V7

3.94 of 5 stars 3.94  ·  rating details  ·  17 ratings  ·  3 reviews
Distinguer pour unir, ou Les degrés du savoirwas first published in 1932 by Jacques Maritain. In this new translation of The Degrees of Knowledge, Ralph McInerny attempts a more careful expression of Maritain's original masterpiece than previous translations. Maritain proposes a hierarchy of the forms of knowledge by discussing the degrees of rational and suprarational und...more
Paperback, 528 pages
Published January 15th 1995 by University of Notre Dame Press (first published 1995)
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Scott Kleinpeter
Dec 31, 2012 Scott Kleinpeter marked it as to-read
Extremely deep account of Neo-Thomistic thought. It would take a good deal of time and concerted attention to read this. This is not a conversation I am as of now totally prepared to engage in. It is likely, though, that I'll arrive here eventually.
Mark
Good Thomistic account of "ways of knowing".
Seth Holler
Apr 08, 2014 Seth Holler marked it as to-read
I tried. Will try again someday.
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T. S. Eliot once called Jacques Maritain "the most conspicuous figure and probably the most powerful force in contemporary philosophy." His wife and devoted intellectual companion, Raissa Maritain, was of Jewish descent but joined the Catholic church with him in 1906. Maritain studied under Henri Bergson but was dissatisfied with his teacher's philosophy, eventually finding certainty in the system...more
More about Jacques Maritain...
An Introduction to Philosophy Art and Scholasticism With Other Essays Person and the Common Good Education at the Crossroads Creative Intuition in Art and Poetry

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