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3.72 of 5 stars 3.72  ·  rating details  ·  733,639 ratings  ·  14,695 reviews
The story of Victor Frankenstein and of the monstrous creature he created has held the reading public spellbound since its publication almost a century and a half ago. On the surface, it is a novel of tense and steadily mounting horror; but on a more profound level, it offers searching illumination of the human condition in its portrayal of a scientist who oversteps the bo ...more
Paperback, 223 pages
Published December 1st 1965 by Signet Classics (first published 1818)
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Allen Williams I read this book in my senior year of high school and I agree with you 100%. I was quite proud of myself for getting through that book to pass my…moreI read this book in my senior year of high school and I agree with you 100%. I was quite proud of myself for getting through that book to pass my class. Have you seen the movie with Robert Deniro? I thought film critics were way too hard on it. I personally thought it was a very good adaptation and I recommend it. Good luck to you on your schooling. (less)
Prarthi Mehta I read it this summer, just for fun. I know what you mean with your mixed emotions - I felt the same way. When the monster came to life, he was not…moreI read it this summer, just for fun. I know what you mean with your mixed emotions - I felt the same way. When the monster came to life, he was not really a monster in any way but appearance. He technically learned how to be a monster (and became violent) from humans. That is why I think the humans are the real monsters in the story. (less)

Community Reviews

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No stars. That's right. Zero, zip. nada.

It's been almost 30 years since I've detested a book this much. I didn't think anything could be worse then Kafka's The Metamorphosis. Seems I'm never too old to be wrong. This time, I don't have the excuse that I was forced to read this for high school lit. class. Oh no, this time I read this of my own volition and for fun. Yeah, fun. Kinda like sticking bamboo shoots between my fingernails type of fun. Watching paint dry fun. Going to an Air Supply conce
My apologies, but this review is going to be a bit frantic due to my brain being so oxygen-starved by the novel’s breath-stealing gorgeousness that I'm feeling a bit light-headed. So please forgive the random thoughts.

First: Mary Shelley…I love you!!

Second: Dear Hollywood - you lying dung pile of literature-savaging, no talent hacks…you got this all wrong. Please learn to read and get yourself a copy of the source material before you FUBAR it again.

Third: My heart shattered for the “monster” an
Emily May
“I have love in me the likes of which you can scarcely imagine and rage the likes of which you would not believe. If I cannot satisfy the one, I will indulge the other.”

I was walking along earlier today with Jacquie and discussing the important things like, you know... books. And the subject of our top favourite books of all time came up. Oddly enough, two of our top three were the same - Wuthering Heights and Crime and Punishment. Then Jacquie said her third was a book that I hadn't thought
I finished it.

If you are a fan of classic literature and/or are utterly devoid of a sense of humor, stop reading this review right now.

I've always wondered what the real Frankenstein story was like...and now I know.
Sadly, sometimes the fantasy is better than the reality.
And the reality is, this book is a big steaming pile of poo.

It's an old-timey horror story, right?
Not so much.
I mean, I wasn't expecting it to actually be scary, but I thought it might be slightly creepy. Unfortunatel
I don’t really know what I was expecting – though ‘more’ comes to mind. Let’s start with what I liked about this book. I liked the idea that the monster is ‘made’ a monster by the treatment he receives from humanity. He is ugly and humanity does like to punish the ugly - this is a universal truth about us that in itself is also fairly ugly.

The other thing I liked was that standard ploy of gothic novels – the multiple Chinese whisper narration. In this the story is all written in a series of lett
Beware; for I am fearless, and therefore powerful.

Well, finally I read the original novel after watching infinite film adaptations, variations of the theme and even odd approaches to the topic.

I was sure that I would enjoy a lot the novel but sadly, compelled to write an honest review, I have to say that barely I was able to give it a 3-star rating, that I think it's the fairest rating that I can give to the book.

The original premise is astonishing, the following impact in popular culture is p
I have a favourite Kate Beaton strip framed up in our book room:

(Full-size image here.)

Mary was – what? – eighteen years old when she went on this famous holiday to Lake Geneva with Percy Bysshe Shelley and Byron and Byron's physician. She was calling herself ‘Mrs Shelley’, though they had not yet married – Percy was still married to someone else.

The surroundings were familiar. The last time Mary and Percy had come to Switzerland had been during their elopement a couple of years earlier, accompa
A great read! highly recommended!

Stephen King in his Danse Macabre novel mentions this as one of three essential horror classics, he says they are ' The Vampire (Dracula), the Werewolf (Jekyl and Hyde) and the thing with no name (Frankenstein).'

The book is so much better than what the movie has tried to communicate. Dr. Victor Frankenstein, who is a brilliant scientist with an obsession tries to play God, by creating a living human being all by himself. But all does not go to plan when the crea
mark monday
...and so I was born! A man, and not a man; a life, and an un-life. Hair and lips of lustrous black, skin of parchment yellow, watery eyes of dun-colored white. The stature of a giant. A horror among men! And so my creator fled me, horrified of his creation. And so I fled my place of birth, to seek lessons amongst the human kind. My lonesome lessons learnt: man is a loving and noble creature; learning is pathway to beauty, to kindness, to fellowship. And this I also learnt: to witness what diffe ...more
Huda Yahya

في بدايات القرن التاسع عشر
كانت الكهرباء وقتها اختراعا طازجا
وحدثا يلقي الرهبة في القلوب

لقد كان معظم الناس يتصور أنها تحمل قدرات خارقة
ولذلك لم يكن من الصعب تخيل أنها يمكنها إعادة الحياة إلى الموتى

فقد كانوا يرونها اختراعا شيطانيا يثير غضب الرب

وأثناء جلسة جمعت بين بعض الشعراء والكتاب في قصر الشاعر لورد بايرن
اقترح المضيف أن يؤلف كل واحد منهم قصة رعب مختلفة
لتزجية الوقت

ومن هنا جاءت إحدى أشهر قصص الرعب الكلاسيكية على مر العصور


الحكاية عن شاب مخترع يدعى فيكتور فرانكنشتاين
قام بتجميع أجزاء من جثث
One of those books you think you know because of its presence in pop culture etc., but you really don't... until you read it. A new favorite of mine for sure!
Bookworm Sean
Let’s have a party Victor. Let’s get together and celebrate all things Gothic, and dark, and wonderful. Let’s have it in an attic in an old house in the middle of a thunderstorm, and then afterwards let’s go to the graveyard with our shovels and our body bags. Sounds good doesn’t it Victor? We could then create our own doppelgängers from the corpses of criminals and geniuses. Then we can abandon our marvellous creation to fend for itself with his childlike innocence, and then wonder why it goes ...more
J.G. Keely
If you have not read the book, then you do not know Frankenstein or his monster. Certainly, there is a creature in our modern mythology which bears that name, but he bears strikingly little resemblance to the original.

It is the opposite with Dracula, where, if you have seen the films, you know the story. Indeed, there is a striking similarity between nearly all the Dracula films, the same story being told over and over again: Harker, bug-eating Renfield, doting Mina, the seduction of Lucy, Dr. V
Bill  Kerwin

It's been fifty years since I had read Frankenstein, and, now—after a recent second reading—I am pleased to see that the adolescent pleasures I remembered so vividly have been revived. Once again I was thrilled by the first glimpse of the immense figure of the monster, driving his sled across the arctic ice, and I marveled at the artful use of narrative frame within frame, each subsequent frame leading us closer to the heart of the novel's creation, until we hear the alienated yet articulate voi
Araz Goran
'' إن حياة أولئك الرجال أهم بكثير من أهدافنا الأنانية ''

قالها أخيراً فرانكنشتاين حين أدرك خطأه وأنانيته وسعيه في الحصول على المجد على حساب من يحبهم.. أدرك فرانكنشتاين أن الحياة لم تخلق له وحده..

ثقيل كان الثمن الذي دفعه فرانكنشتاين في سبيل تهوره وأتخاذه القرار الخاطئ في حق الذين يحبهم..

تكمن حكمة هذه الرواية في أمر مهم ألا وهو،، أن أول الناس المتضررين من أعمالك الخاطئة ليسوا الغرباء ولا أعدائك،، بل هم أقرب الناس إليك حتى فعلت فعلتك وأنت بعيد عنهم آلالاف الأميال..

المسخ الذي صنعه فرانكنشتاين يمثل بص
"Pray tell me your story," I said, "if it will not weary you overmuch."

He fixed me with an eye still firm of purpose. "I had long been fascinated by the dark arts of Parody and Homage," he began. "I studied the works of the masters. Juvenal, Swift, Beerbohm, Douglas Adams... I curse the day when I discovered the Grimoire of John Sladek mouldering in an old bookshop. It was then my plan began to take shape..."

He broke off, racked by a fit of coughing. "Sir, you should rest," I said. He snorted co
Shannon (Giraffe Days)
Frankenstein is the first book written by Mary Shelley (daughter of Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin, wife of Percy Bysshe Shelley, friend of Lord Byron), and her most famous. First published in 1818, she later revised it for its second printing in 1823, adding a preface that cleared up conjecture as to what she was writing about, changing the relationship of Elizabeth to the family (in the original, she is Victor Frankenstein's cousin, in the second she has no blood relation but
Renato Magalhães Rocha
Like Victor Frankenstein’s creation - it promised to be amazing and it seemed to work perfectly in theory but after being assembled together, it left its creator cold and horrified - this classic novel, after setting up some very interesting premises, left me disappointed.

The book’s beginning was promising: Mary Shelley wrapped up her gothic novel in a very interesting frame, she employed several narrators and different points of view to tell her story. It seemed this was going to be a rather la
 Danielle The Book Huntress (Self-Proclaimed Book Ninja)
Mary W. Shelley explored themes that still resonate today in her proto-science fiction work, Frankenstein. Themes of the relentless drive and search for ultimate (even forbidden) knowledge; intellectual arrogance; the desire to create something enduring; the need for love and recognition; and a study in how bitterness, hatred and rage can destroy a person. What separates men from God? What separates man from monster? Can a so-called monster have the heart (the humanity) and the accompanying need ...more
Brandon Pearce
Mary Shelly wrote this book when she was only 18 years old. She was under the heavy influence of her politically radical, and powerful parents. And she was very much aware of the political movements that had shattered Europe in the late 1700's and early 1800's. The noble efforts of the French Revolution had recently ended with the reign of Terror and left Europe in a conservative backlash that included a crack down on civil liberties. Also keep in mind that the book's full title is "Frankenstein ...more
Don't understand all the mediocre ratings on this one......... I love the way this nightmarish story begins with ships Captain Robert Walton's letters to his beloved sister in England while trapped amidst a frozen Arctic Ocean. It drew me right in...... Surrounded by thick fog and ice, he tells of the bizarre sighting of a gigantic being in the shape of a man leading a sledge of dogs, and the mysterious stranger he later rescues with an unbelievable tale of evil and sorrow.

First published in 181


I was maybe 10 or 11 when I read this, though the various incarnations since have remained relatively true to the source material to keep the basic elements. Here we have one of the very first iterations of both gothic horror and science fiction, which is probably why video stores combined both sections into one (when they really shouldn't have).

The basic story as well all know it is thus: Dr. Frankenstein, which is NOT the name of the monster!, experiments and finds a way to bring life to dead
Kevin Cambronero
Por ser mi creador, te juro odio eterno.

Sinceramente creí que no iba a gustarme. Había visto tantas críticas negativas que pensé que iba a ser aburrido e insípido. Pero fue todo lo contrario, me encantó. La culpa de que a muchos no les haya gustado la tuvo la versión cinematográfica (que yo por dicha no vi), en donde al parecer hicieron lo que les dio la gana con la historia, porque el libro es excelente.


La prosa de Shelley es formidable. Es una novela fascinante y muy entretenida, de principi
Jason Koivu
Warning!: Buttload of sarcasm incoming!!!

Oh yes, that's just brilliant...Let's tell the story in a second-hand past tense. That'll get us right into the action! And I love how this second-hand story-teller is able to relate in very fine detail dialogue exchanges between the monster and people he met years ago via a third person account from the dying Dr. Frankenstein. I mean honestly, what were you thinking Mary?! Why remove the reader so far from the story? This is potentially exciting subjec
First off, I just want to point out that many people make the mistake of thinking that the creature in the novel is named Frankenstein, but the truth is that Frankenstein is actually the name of the scientist who created the monster.

Victor Frankenstein is an intelligent and promising young student at the University of Ingolstadt. Victor's obsession and passion for science leads to him creating a living creature. Horrified at himself, Victor shuns the creature and attempts to continue his life w

The first time I picked up Frankenstein, I was in primary school and had no idea of the famous character preparing to waken from it's sleep. To me, it was just a ‘book’ that came in a pretty leather bound cover with a promise of mystery. (Leather bound covers always seem like they have something important to tell you). And it was with such ignorance that I began my journey through Mary Shelley’s ‘Frankenstein: The Modern Prometheus’. More than a decade later, this story remains just as riveting.

It is almost a pity that the story of Frankenstein is so well known because far too many people neglect to bother reading Mary Shelley’s novel under the assumption that they already know the story. This is a shame because Frankenstein is beautifully written, very dark and scary but also quite poignant.

Most people have an image of Frankenstein’s Monster as a shambling massive thing with bolts on its neck, going around mumbling GAAHHH GAAAAAH!!! and snapping people’s necks because that is how he
If the study to which you apply yourself has a tendency to weaken your affections and to destroy your taste for those simple pleasures in which no alloy can possibly mix, then the study is certainly unlawful, that is to say, not befitting the human mind. If this rule were always observed; if no man allowed any pursuit whatsoever to interfere with the tranquility of his domestic affections, Greece would not have been enslaved; Caesar would have spared his country; America would have been di
Jul 19, 2013 Amanda rated it 2 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Anyone interested in the Frankenstein story
Recommended to Amanda by: Ruth Provost
While I did not enjoy this book, I am glad that I read it because it is interesting to see how different Frankenstein's monster has become after Hollywood and pop culture reinvented Shelley's creation. If you were to watch the film version of the movie and then read the book, you might be shocked to find that they're supposedly the same story. Despite this, I did not enjoy the book for the following reasons:

A) Ugh, Romanticism. Yes, yes. The trees, the mountains, the flowers are beautiful, but I
This and Anna Karenina are as close as I know to perfect. The only thing that holds Frankenstein back is the writing style; at times you're reminded that Shelley was only 18 when she wrote it. The plot and pacing are perfect, and the scenes are terrific - particularly the exquisite first bit of the monster's story - but there are sometimes some minor rough patches in the sentences.

It's a warning, of course, about creating things we don't understand. Everyone knows that. What I'm interested by, t
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Mary Shelley (née Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin, often known as Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley) was a British novelist, short story writer, dramatist, essayist, biographer, travel writer, and editor of the works of her husband, Romantic poet and philosopher Percy Bysshe Shelley. She was the daughter of the political philosopher William Godwin and the writer, philosopher, and feminist Mary Wollstonecraft ...more
More about Mary Shelley...

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“Nothing is so painful to the human mind as a great and sudden change.” 3521 likes
“Beware; for I am fearless, and therefore powerful.” 2731 likes
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