The Iliad
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating

The Iliad

by
3.78 of 5 stars 3.78  ·  rating details  ·  179,876 ratings  ·  2,950 reviews
The Iliad is one of the two classical Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It's one of the most ancient & well-known works of literature. It's followed by Homer's The Odyssey.
The Iliad recounts the last days of the ten-year Trojan War, during which the Mycenean king Agamemnon & other Greek allies, notably the warrior Achilles, laid siege to the city of Troy (Ilium...more
Kindle Edition
Published December 1st 2008 (first published -800)
more details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.
This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  rating details
Sandy Tjan
What I learned from this book (in no particular order):

1. Victory or defeat in ancient Greek wars is primarily the result of marital spats and/or petty sibling rivalry in Zeus and Hera’s dysfunctional divine household.

2. Zeus “the father of gods and men” is a henpecked husband who is also partial to domestic abuse.

3. If you take a pretty girl who is the daughter of a priest of Apollo as war booty and refuse to have her ransomed, Apollo will rain plague on your troops. And he won’t be appeased un...more
Alison
I've moved my most popular goodreads review evah to my blog:

http://goodbyegoodreads.blogspot.com/...

Thanks to everybody who liked it!!!!!!!
Riku Sayuj

TROY VI: THE INVENTION OF ACHILLES

“The Classics, it is the Classics!” William Blake is said to have exclaimed, with pointed reference to Homer, “that Desolate Europe with Wars!

Blake's exclamation might not be as atrocious as it sounds at first. There might be some truth to this, a universal truth.

Significantly however, this is not how the ancients understood it. They understood war as the catastrophe that it is.

Strabo, the Roman geographer, talking about the Trojan wars, puts it thus: “For it...more
Sparrow
Oct 13, 2012 Sparrow rated it 5 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: grads
Recommended to Sparrow by: Professor Borin
At my college graduation, the speaker was a gruff professor. He was one of those older men whom people somewhat patronizingly describe as a teddy bear to convey the idea that while he looks like Santa Claus, they wouldn’t be surprised to see him arraigned on assault charges at the local courthouse. I liked this professor in general, and his graduation speech was a grand: warm congratulations on a crisp early-summer day. He decided to inform us, however, that anyone who had not read The Iliad and...more
Keely
Pablo Picasso spent his entire life trying desperately to do something new, something unique. He moved from style to style, mastering and then abandoning both modern and classical methods, even trying to teach his trained artist's hand to paint like a child.

In 1940, four French teens and a dog stumbled upon a cave that had lain hidden for 16,000 years. Inside, they found the walls covered in beautiful drawings of men and animals. When the Lascaux caves were opened to the public, Pablo Picasso vi...more
Terry
Am I really going to bother reviewing Homer’s _Iliad_? I mean, what am I going to say that hasn’t been said by generations of scholars, reviewers or readers? Does another drop in the ocean matter? Well, even if it doesn’t I’ll give it a go I guess. Reading the _Iliad_ was mostly done by me as a correction to a perceived gap in my education. I had always known bits and pieces about the poem and its heroes from various sources and the culture in general, but I had never read the poem itself. Given...more
Madeline
I don't know why I read this. It isn't on The List (I guess because it's technically a poem, not a novel), and it wasn't assigned reading or anything. But for whatever reason, reading The Iliad has been on my mental to-do list for a while now, and last week I finally picked it up.

My first reaction: dude, this epic is epic. (thank you, I'll be here all week) It's full of dudes getting killed in really exquisite detail, dudes talking about killing or not killing dudes, dudes mourning dead dudes i...more
Sarah (Warning: Potentially Off-Topic)
When I first read The Iliad, I was way too young to fully appreciate it. I understood, of course, the backstory - a spiteful goddess is left off a wedding invitation list, she retaliates by giving the Trojan prince Paris a golden apple to reward to the best-looking goddess (because that can’t go wrong), he picks Aphrodite because she promises him the incomparably beautiful (and already married) Helen, angering the other goddesses in the process, Paris selfishly steals Helen (and a lot of treasur...more
Stevelvis
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Terence
Jan 05, 2013 Terence rated it 4 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Everyone
UPDATE JAN 2013: I finished reading Stephen Mitchell's translation soon after the New Year and can't recommend it enough.

And, as with any good literature, I find that upon rereading the Iliad, I got something more out of it. Something that had nothing to do with my first impressions noted below (and that I'll elaborate upon more fully in my review of David Malouf's Ransom: A Novel when I finish that book).
____________________________________________

Up to now, I’ve only read fragments of The Ilia...more
Trevor
I read the Odyssey at Uni and really loved it. A romp off to parts unknown with a man who is good company from a distance. As with much of fiction, the people I am delighted to spend lots of time with on the page are not necessarily those I would want to spend anytime with otherwise.

I’ve always meant to get around to reading this. I mean, this Homer guy only wrote two books and I had enjoyed the other one, so … so, a mere twenty years later (how time flies) I got around to reading this one.

The p...more
Szplug
It must be said that Fagles' translation is truly a thing of beauty, measured in full to the epic course of this poem-that-begat-all-poems within the Western canon—expressively and aptly capturing the jarring, bone-splintering, sanguinary shock of men slaughtering men with bronzemongery at close quarters, the descent of the dark, whilst afire with passions personal and/or divinely-stoked; the morphic wiles and chameleon chromatism of the Olympian gods and goddesses—the latter of which strike me...more
Jim Coughenour
"Sprung out of bitterness, the philosophy of the Iliad excludes resentment." Thus Rachel Bespaloff, stating the seemingly impossible. Years ago I read the Iliad in Fitzgerald's fine translation, but every page had the heavy cadence of a "classic." Now I'm reading Fagles' and Lombardo's translations back to back, and am surprised how much I'm enjoying the poem. I don't dispute those who judge Fagles the superior translator, but for me the Lombardo version is far more stirring.

Consider the opening...more
Ian
How could one so humble as I and so disfavored by the gods as to have the poetic ability of a blind cosmetics-testing monkey rate a work so great as The Iliad, a poetic masterpiece that has astounded and inspired for over 3,000 years, anything less than five stars? The answer to that question, which you seek with the zealous lust of tigress in heat, is, of course, that I could not. I dare not, lest I risk the wrath of Olympus. As a cow stands lowing over her first calf, so will I jealously guard...more
Christopher H.
This review of The Iliad is associated with the translation by Robert Fagles (1990)--

"Homer makes us Hearers, and Virgil leaves us Readers." So wrote Alexander Pope, in 1715, in the preface to his translation of The Iliad.

I have just completed reading a magnificent translation of Homer's The Iliad, and couldn't have enjoyed the experience more. I had read bits and pieces of The Iliad over the course of my life, but I had never read the entire poem from start to finish. I recently purchased the P...more
Evan Leach
"Rage – Goddess, sing the rage of Peleus’ son Achilles,
murderous, doomed, that cost the Achaeans countless losses,
hurling down to the House of Death so many sturdy souls…"


img: Achilles

Before I start gushing praise all over this book, I can think of three things that might discourage readers from tackling The Iliad:

1. It is a very long (nearly 15,700 lines) poem. If you really don’t have a taste for poetry at all, then this may not be the book for you.

2. It is fairly violent. Lots and lots of people get spear...more
Jonathan

The Iliad, a daunting work of fiction so genius that it has survived for thousands of years. To this day there is no modern epic which stands anywhere near it except perhaps Les Misérables or Paradise Lost. Perhaps those who are informed could add The Divine Comedy to this list, however I have not read Dante's work as of yet.

Before I continue I'd like to point out that the translation I read was Robert Fitzgerald's translation. Which seemed solid if nothing particularly special. I do think that...more
Lona
الإلياذة والأوديسة، لطالما تعثرت بهما أثناء قراءتي للعديد من الكتب والروايات، بالإضافة إلى أنهما من الكلاسيكيات التي إن شئت أو أبيت لابد من قراءتها يوما ما، وخصوصاً أنهما أفسدتا عدة قراءات سابقة لي بكونهما محور ترتكز عليه تلك القراءات. مثل رواية "الاحتقار" لألبيرتو مورافيا التي ترتكز كثيراً على الأوديسة، ومحاورة أفلاطون "الجمهورية" التي قررت التوقف عن قراءتها لحين الانتهاء منهما للتمكن من دخول أجواء ومجاراة هذه المحاورة


أحد أهم الأسباب التي بسببها أجَّلت قراءتهما طويلاً هي كونهما ملحمة شعرية و أ
...more
Adam Floridia
Fair warning, this review probably contains spoilers. I'm not hiding it, though, because, seriously, who doesn't know what happens in The Iliad? You've got to be some kind of moron not to know this story.


So...I must be some kind of moron. I could swear I read this back in high school and/or college. I also would have bet you that I could tell you what it's about pretty dang accurately. Well here's where I would have lost that bet.

1) Achilles is the greatest, noblest hero E-V-E-R... Now I would c...more
Andy
This is my second time reading the Iliad, and I loved it. I came up with a routine. A few times a week, I'd walk with my wife to our favorite local, independent coffee shop (about a mile away), order a small, soy mocha, loop the Sigur Ros album () on my iPod, read one book and then walk home. It worked great. I feel as if ancient Greeks couldn't have appreciated it more. I've already started reading the Odyssey with the same routine (except with a different Sigur Ros album).
Peycho Kanev
The Iliad ranks as one of the most important and most influential works in world literature in that it established literary standards and conventions that writers have imitated over the centuries, down to the present day. The Iliad is a brutal, dynamic, psychologically complex narrative. It has a forward motion that can lead the reader on page after page. The Iliad is certainly a piece of literature that has stood the test of time - and with good reason. War has constantly been a feature of huma...more
Chris
Sing to me, O Muse, of a long damn poem,
which saddled the backs of many a Freshman English Major before me
and brought the mist of term papers down around our eyes

Can you tell me, O Muse, of the deeds done in this book
in less time than it takes to fight the actual war
in which the blood of many a legendary, some say mythical, figure
was spilt and lost, fed into the hungry earth of Troy?
Sing to me of feasting and fighting and the filching of treasure
of Dawn and her Rosy Fingers as they greet the ten...more
Kilburn Adam
For some reason I read The Odyssey before this book. Well I've finally managed to finish it. I ordered the Robert Fagles verse translation by mistake. I wanted a prose translation. But I read it anyway. It's definitely a book worth reading. There are so many characters in this book. And their names are even harder to pronounce than Russian names. But as the book goes on, more and more people are killed. So there are less people's names to remember. It's an incredibly violent book, with quite gra...more
Io?
Materia viva che pulsa da quasi tremila anni, segno indelebile della nascita della nostra cultura occidentale, segno indelebile della nostra rovina. Una cosa mi colpito – le lacrime – le lacrime di Achille, le lacrime di Agamennone. Il pianto degli eroi bambini che li umanizza e li rende partecipi di una umanità a volte meschina, a volte dolce, a volte crudele ma che mai - mai e poi mai - impara dai propri errori.
James Murphy
I'd read The Iliad before in the Robert Fagles translation and one by Stanley Lombardo, a classics professor from the University of Kansas. But I'd always heard about the earlier Richmond Lattimore translation. It seems that whenever you read a critical work on Homer the Lattimore is quoted rather than other editions. I've frequently come across books quoting Lattimore, and recently I became interested in a critical study of Homer called The War That Killed Achilles by Caroline Alexander. But re...more
matt
OK, deep breath here...I haven't read, or better to say understood, Homer as much as I ought to. I've picked up and put down The Odyssey a few times and I just hate to admit that it's not clicking for my modern mind as much as it ought to. It's not the deep brow'd blind sage, it's me. Did not read it in high school, was unfortunately lacking in my ancient Greek history and mythos (getting better, hopefully) and therefore the gods, and gods upon gods, and the drama between them all plays out so i...more
htanzil
Tahukah Anda kalau di dunia ini ada dua kisah peperangan yang begitu melegenda dan abadi? Jika kita bagi dunia menjadi dua kultur (Barat dan Timur) di timur kita mengenal perang Bratayudha, sedangkan di kultur Barat kita mengenal kisah Perang Troya.

Jika Perang Brathayuda yang merupakan klimaks dari kisah Ramayana ditulis di India oleh Begawan Vyasa Dwaipayana pada 1500 SM, kisah perang Troya ditulis oleh Homer pada tahun 800 SM dalam dua buku karyanya yaitu The Iliad dan Oddysey. Sayangnya kedua...more
S. Annelise

Go beneath the bloody layers of severed arms and broken skulls crushed by horses' hoofs. Keep breathing, you'll soon be beyond the stench of sweating, terrified men dying of punctured bowel wounds. Keep listening to the poetry, because below the high pitched screams of the women being raped lie several stories of bravery and cowardice, regular as heartbeats, and as you reach the end you'll recognize that stories of strength and honor have been thrumming through the gore since page one.

Yes, we'r...more
Christopher H.
This is my review of Robert Fitzgerald's translation (1974) of Homer's The Iliad--

This makes the third translation of The Iliad that I've read over the past year or so, and I quite liked it. While Fitzgerald's translation is perhaps not as rhythmically poetic as that of Robert Fagles (1990), or perhaps as ruthlessly faithful to the Greek text as Richmond Lattimore's verse translation (1951), it really is incredibly lyrical and reads very, very well. The Iliad is one of the greatest works of lite...more
midnightfaerie
The Iliad by (we think) Homer was a very involved piece of work. First of all, let me say, there were parts of this I really enjoyed, and parts that were difficult to get through. I had to brush up on my Gods and often had to stop and look one of them up again. To me, this story is probably one of the most comprehensive and definitive works on the Greek Gods. The other thing I noticed about this literary piece, was, straight up, the gore. The author has a fantastic way of detailing the horrors o...more
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 99 100 next »
topics  posts  views  last activity   
Favorite character? 30 94 Jul 15, 2014 04:30PM  
Goodreads Librari...: Wrong Page Number 6 17 Jun 27, 2014 04:59PM  
Just Literature: The Iliad 1 4 Apr 15, 2014 03:21AM  
Achilles vs Hector 252 475 Jan 31, 2014 12:32PM  
St. Anne's Readin...: Iliad 01/25/13 1 2 Jan 26, 2014 04:38PM  
St. Anne's Readin...: Notes The Iliad 01/11/14 1 4 Jan 12, 2014 01:24PM  
  • The Aeneid
  • Hesiod: The Works and Days, Theogony, and The Shield of Herakles
  • Medea and Other Plays
  • Metamorphoses
  • The Complete Poems
  • The Persian Expedition
  • Purgatorio (The Divine Comedy, #2)
  • Sophocles II: Ajax/Women of Trachis/Electra/Philoctetes (Complete Greek Tragedies 4)
  • The Oresteia
  • Njal's Saga
  • Lysistrata and Other Plays
  • Jason and the Golden Fleece (The Argonautica)
  • The History of the Peloponnesian War
  • The Odes
  • The Library of Greek Mythology (World's Classics)
  • The Histories
  • Plutarch's Lives, Volume 1
903
In the Western classical tradition, Homer (Greek: Όμηρος) is considered the author of The Iliad and The Odyssey, and is revered as the greatest of ancient Greek epic poets. These epics lie at the beginning of the Western canon of literature, and have had an enormous influence on the history of literature.
When he lived is unknown. Herodotus estimates that Homer lived 400 years before his own time,...more
More about Homer...
The Odyssey The Iliad/The Odyssey The Odyssey, Book 1-12 The Iliad/The Odyssey/The Aeneid The Children's Homer: The Adventures of Odysseus and the Tale of Troy

Share This Book

“Everything is more beautiful
because we’re doomed.
You will never be lovelier than you are now.
We will never be here again.”
459 likes
“…There is the heat of Love, the pulsing rush of Longing, the lover’s whisper, irresistible—magic to make the sanest man go mad.” 307 likes
More quotes…