Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Five Great Novels” as Want to Read:
Five Great Novels
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Five Great Novels

4.29 of 5 stars 4.29  ·  rating details  ·  1,601 ratings  ·  9 reviews
This volume contains five legendary works of science fiction: THE THREE STIGMATA OF PALMER ELDRITCH, MARTIAN TIME SLIP, DO ANDROIDS DREAM OF ELECTRIC SHEEP? (filmed as BLADE RUNNER), UBIK and A SCANNER DARKLY. Taken together they represent the best of Philip K. Dick's unique imagination. In Dick's writing nothing is what it seems, our sense of the world's order is constant ...more
Paperback, Gollancz S.F., 848 pages
Published 2008 by Gollancz (first published May 2004)
more details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Five Great Novels, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Five Great Novels

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30 of 3,000)
filter  |  sort: default (?)  |  rating details
Iain Turnbull
This is a compilation of five books:

The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch: Off-world colonists try to forget their harsh existence through the use of hallucinogenic drugs and doll-sets. Interesting ideas, but also very confusing. ***

Martian Time-Slip: A powerful union-head tries to hold on to his power by manipulating a boy who sees time differently. So many unlikeable characters, it's hard to stay with this one. **

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?: A bounty hunter attempts to find and kill a
...more
Kevin Tole
I don't read much science fiction (thank god) but thought I'd give this a bash. Consists of the 'Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch' which is well weird; 'Martian Time Slip' which is captivating and well written; 'Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep' - yep the basis for Bladerunner but a lot lot better than Bladerunner in parts (and also worse in others); Ubik which is probably the most interesting and better developed of the five; and A Scanner Darkly which is just pathetic, decrepit and not wor ...more
Derek
Writing over 40 novels, often at breakneck speed while on various drugs, Phillip K Dick produced a lot of so-so work and about 15 or so essential books. Five of those essential ones are here, in a handy 840 page omnibus. I'm convinced now that there are two kinds of people, the kind that loves his work and can't get enough and the kind that starts crying and goes "I don't get it! This is terrible because I do not get it!" If you're one of those people, you should probably stop after a few chapte ...more
Duncan Mandel
EDITORIAL REVIEW: This volume contains DO ANDROIDS DREAM OF ELECTRIC SHEEP? (filmed as BLADERUNNER), MARTIAN TIME SLIP, UBIK, THE THREE STIGMATA OF PALMER ELDRITCH and A SCANNER DARKLY. Taken together they represent the best of Philip K. Dick's unique imagination. In Dick's writing nothing is what it seems, our sense of the world's order is fatally undermined and mass media tells us nothing but artful lies. Films such as THE MATRIX and THE TRUMAN SHOW would not have been made but for Philip K. D ...more
Stefan
Buy this Just do it!
Stuart
I know Phil Dick has great stature in the world of science fiction and many of his stories have been made into films. However, I honestly found this book a real chore to read. Many of his stories have elements of drug use in them, which is hardly surprising given his own drug use. These elements of his stories massively detract from the more hard-boiled science fiction elements. Too often the stories seemed to ramble along aimlessly and you start to wonder where on earth it's going.

The films mad
...more
Peter
Classic Sci Fi: What more can I say? PKD invented modern science fiction in my book. And here are 5 of his best stories. Yes, the Bladerunner one is there, and so is A Scanner Darkly, which is better.
Mike Horwath
Another book read a while ago but still on the to-read list.

I want to read everything PKD did, never boring, always entertaining and exciting.
Mandy
Dick fanatic - nuff said.
Northern Pasty
Northern Pasty marked it as to-read
Apr 30, 2015
Patricia Rodrigues
Patricia Rodrigues marked it as to-read
Apr 28, 2015
Chris
Chris marked it as to-read
Apr 27, 2015
Brenda
Brenda marked it as to-read
Apr 24, 2015
Wert
Wert marked it as to-read
Apr 23, 2015
Rico Vanian
Rico Vanian marked it as to-read
Apr 20, 2015
B
B marked it as to-read
Apr 20, 2015
Mahreen Khan
Mahreen Khan marked it as to-read
Apr 18, 2015
Elliot Grimes
Elliot Grimes marked it as to-read
Apr 16, 2015
Amcii Cullum
Amcii Cullum marked it as to-read
Apr 15, 2015
Angie
Angie marked it as to-read
Apr 15, 2015
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 99 100 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
  • The Essential Tales and Poems
  • Screwjack: A Short Story
  • Cat's Cradle: Witch Mark
  • Dial M for Monkey
  • Factoring Humanity
  • Three-Ten to Yuma and Other Stories
  • The Insult
  • Someday This Will Be Funny
  • Ladies and Gentlemen
  • When You Ride Alone You Ride With Bin Laden: What the Government Should Be Telling Us to Help Fight the War on Terrorism
  • The Angel on the Roof
  • Stories
  • Stanley Kubrick's Clockwork Orange
  • Osprey Island
  • Hollywood Nocturnes
  • A Night at the Movies, Or, You Must Remember This: Fictions
  • Enchanted Again
  • For Whom the Bell Tolls (Sparknotes Literature Guides)
4764
Philip K. Dick was born in Chicago in 1928 and lived most of his life in California. He briefly attended the University of California, but dropped out before completing any classes. In 1952, he began writing professionally and proceeded to write numerous novels and short-story collections. He won the Hugo Award for the best novel in 1962 for The Man in the High Castle and the John W. Campbell Memo ...more
More about Philip K. Dick...
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? A Scanner Darkly The Man in the High Castle Ubik Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said

Share This Book