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Victorian Women

3.79  ·  Rating Details ·  39 Ratings  ·  4 Reviews
While the aristocratic women of the Victorian age have long preoccupied the popular imagination, seldom have women of other classes been granted a voice. Victorian Women is the first book to allow women of all classes to render their own lives, in their own words, from birth to old age, in the long nineteenth century between the French Revolution and the First World War.

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Paperback, 264 pages
Published January 1st 1995 by New York University Press (first published September 9th 1993)
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Liz
Feb 28, 2011 Liz rated it it was ok
This book doesn't really feel like a proper academic source; however, for a general overview about conditions for women during the long nineteenth century then Perkins' book is a good place to start. It dispels many myths about the Victorian woman as well as reveals many of her secrets. All-in-all, it's a good read.


"On average, women of all classes married between the ages of twenty-three and twenty-six; men between twenty-five and thirty" (Perkins 2).

"By marriage, husband and wife became one p
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Niki
Feb 21, 2010 Niki rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Amazing book on the lives of women in the Victorian age. I stayed up all night reading it.
Angela Platt
Mar 23, 2015 Angela Platt rated it it was amazing
Excellent portrayal of women's history in the Victorian era- discusses the roles of women according to their social class and further delves into education and opportunities of women in this era. A lot of the views are quite shockingly different from what we believe today... For example- it was believed that women should not be highly intellectually educated, or it would interfere with their ability to reproduce children. Society has come a long way, needless to say.
Steelwhisper
Informative, clarifying where some current assumptions about Victorian women go wrong (and quite in line with Gathorne-Hardy in that respect in spite of a considerable difference in time!) due the lack of perspective, as a whole quite a meaty read.

Recommended to everyone who wants to broaden knowledge about that era in relation to women and interaction with society and the other gender.
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