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The John Franklin Bardin Omnibus

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4.30  ·  Rating Details  ·  60 Ratings  ·  5 Reviews
Brings together three crime novels written between 1946 and 1948 that originated from nightmare experiences and are noted for their hallucinatory intensity of feeling and treatment of morbid psychology.
Paperback, 602 pages
Published August 26th 1976 by Penguin Books
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Simon Duffy
May 30, 2009 Simon Duffy rated it it was amazing
If you have any love of 40's and 50's detective writing find this book! One of the great unknown treasures of the past - John Franklin Bardin wrote three great stories and then edited a law revue for the rest of his life and never wrote about gumshoes again (as I recall the story from several decades ago). All three have been collected in this Omnibus which will not disappoint fans of Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett.
Tom Lichtenberg
May 02, 2010 Tom Lichtenberg rated it it was amazing
Shelves: mystery
Bardin (as well as John Fante) was like a bridge between Dashiell Hammett and Philip K. Dick, between Raymond Chandler and David Lynch. He's hard-boiled, yet psychedelic, traditional yet wildly futuristic. The three novels contained in this volume are all pretty stunning.
Susanna
Sep 03, 2014 Susanna rated it liked it
Evocative psychological thrillers. I'm not sure people think that many steps ahead....but what a great world he brings to life.
Dan
Apr 02, 2009 Dan rated it liked it
Shelves: novels
Thrillers that make employment of psychoanalytic concepts to chilling effect. Enjoying Bardin’s work may require some suspension of intertextual knowledge: while some of the things he represents in these novels were new when he wrote, they have since become clichéd, having been reused in “movie of the week” type drama on television.
Michael
Mar 01, 2012 Michael rated it really liked it
Like reading a david lynch movie. Great, weird stuff.
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John Franklin Bardin was born in Cincinnati, Ohio on November 30, 1916. During his teens, he lost nearly all his immediate family to various ailments. As he approached thirty, he moved to New York City where during his adulthood he was an executive of an advertising agency, published ten novels and taught creative writing as well as advertising at the NEW SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH.

In 1946, Bardin
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