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Statistics on the Table: The History of Statistical Concepts and Methods
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Statistics on the Table: The History of Statistical Concepts and Methods

4.12  ·  Rating Details  ·  25 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
This lively collection of essays examines in witty detail the history of some of the concepts involved in bringing statistical argument "to the table," and some of the pitfalls that have been encountered. The topics range from seventeenth-century medicine and the circulation of blood, to the cause of the Great Depression and the effect of the California gold discoveries of ...more
Paperback, 504 pages
Published September 30th 2002 by Harvard University Press (first published November 1st 1999)
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Alex Reinhart
Feb 23, 2014 Alex Reinhart rated it it was amazing
This is an excellent book on varied topics in the history of statistics -- assuming you already know something about statistics. It is a compilation of historical essays Stigler wrote for various academic journals, so he assumes the reader has some knowledge of distributions, expectations, random variables, and so on. (But there is nothing someone with one or two courses in statistics shouldn't be able to work out.)

For essays published in academic journals, these are surprisingly readable. Stigl
...more
Jerzy
Jul 15, 2007 Jerzy marked it as to-read
Shelves: math, statistics
The writing is good but it turns out this is a collection of independent essays, each about a very specific point in the history of statistics. For example the essay on Quetelet, a 19th-century statistician I've never heard of, assumes that you already know why he's important. Other essays seem to demand quite a bit of technical knowledge. I'll put this aside for now until I've read something more general - perhaps Stigler's own The History of Statistics: The Measurement of Uncertainty before 1 ...more
Abe Kazemzadeh
Jul 08, 2011 Abe Kazemzadeh rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: people interested in history of ideas and or statistics
The last two books I"ve read have been about the lives of statisticians. This one is more detailed, goes into the math, goes back farther into history, and gives lots of references. Salsburg's book (the lady tasting tea) is more of a popular science book. It's a little easier to read, perhaps to whet your apppetite for this one.
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