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Y: Le Dernier Homme, #1: No Man's Land
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Y: Le Dernier Homme, #1: No Man's Land (Y: The Last Man #1)

4.12 of 5 stars 4.12  ·  rating details  ·  67,055 ratings  ·  1,976 reviews
In the summer of 2002, a plague of unknown origin destroyed every last sperm, fetus, and fully developed mammal with a Y chromosome--with the apparent exception of one young man and his male pet. This "gendercide" instantaneously exterminated 48% of the global population, or approximately 2.9 billion men.

Now, aided by the mysterious Agent 355, the last human male Yorick Br
Published (first published January 1st 2003)
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In typical comic book male-centric fashion, this series wonders what life would be like if all men died spontaneously...except for one.

I suppose if we're trying to put ourselves in the head of an early-nineties comic book reading teen, this might feel innovative. Unfortunately, I find that innovative in the world of comics is pretty much Iron Age for the rest of literature. How does Vaughan manage to make a series with gender issues at its center so bizarrely sexist?

Example: In a world where a
Shelby *wants some flying monkeys*

Yorick Brown is that guy who can't hold down a job. Plays with magic..and he is the last man on earth. Something has killed off everything male on the planet. He and his pet monkey are all that's left.

Now gangs of women called the Amazons, a bunch of Republicans and his brainwashed sister Hero are all wanting a piece of Yorick.

Either to kill him or mate him. He just wants to find his fiance in Australia.
This was a fun book. I thought it was going to go very political but quickly became a fun
So there's this thing that happens in post-apocalypse stories that I need to talk to you about.

You know how in a zombiepocalypse story we occassionally receive hints that it might be better for the women to stay safe so they can make babies? Usually it's only hints, and the male characters don't seem to want to offend the post-feminist sensibilities of the women, so instead the women tote guns and put their wombs at risk of becoming a zombie-buffet. But everyone gets along-ish, and there are us
I haven’t read a comic book since I was a child, saving my measly allowance for Archie and his friends. Once I discovered my mother’s Harold Robbins novels, I never went back to comics…until now.

A number of my Goodreads friends enjoy graphic novels (as they are called now), so I became curious and asked my friend Kemper for a recommendation. Y: The Last Man was perfect for me to start with. I love post-apocalyptic stories and wanted some light, easy reading between school books.

A plague that des
Hunger For Knowledge
A person like me could think a graphic series made out of a world where is only one man left middle of strong, and weak, amazonian females, would perhaps be a nice addition to my collection, but I would be wrong.

The idea itself is unoriginal but in no means a reason why it would not be an entertaining way to use the time, and even offer something new to the dead beat subject. Y: The Last Man is a long, award winning series, which could explain why the bore was constantly hanging over my shoulder
Ok so maybe it's just me but I found this series to be incredibly chauvinist. I know I'm gonna get flamed for it, so many ppl rave about it. I APPRECIATED IT but the premise and execution and what the women were doing, boy oh boy.

I'm gonna shut up and not review this. Check box'd.

What if all the men, except one young man and his male monkey pet, were wiped out all over the world and nobody knew why exactly? That's the setup for volume one of this series that takes a look at gender issues and progressive science versus a natural order of things. I like that the explanation for the plague is not known and there are several possibilities.

There's a fair amount of mischievous style humor in the first volume. For instance, women commemorate the dead man at an obvious phallic
Well, I get why everyone LOOOVES this book but some of it just rubbed me the wrong way. Like I don't understand why the entire world just stops functioning completely. Are there no female engineers or scientists or electricians in the entirety of the world?
Wow! I knew this was going to be good, but I'm actually blown away. I need Volume 2!!
If you are a woman,
You might have to sleep with me
Since I'm the Last Man on Earth
And there ain't nothing wrong with me

Loudon Wainwright III

Meet Yorick, an unemployed English major with moderate-to-poor computer skills. He lives on ramen noodles. And, oh yeah, his hobby is magic.

You probably wouldn't sleep with him if he was the...well, nevermind.

There he is, ladies - The Last Man on Earth.

The dating pool has just gotten a little smaller thanks to a mysterious plague that has wiped out all males,
Sep 13, 2008 Bruce rated it 3 of 5 stars  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: teens, avid comics fans
Recommended to Bruce by: Washington Post comics blog commenter
I've read so much here and elsewhere about how brilliant this series is, and from the two books I've read, I'm afraid I can't agree. The concept (plague instantaneously kills all Y-chromosome mammals -- except a guy named Yorick and his pet capuchin monkey -- around the globe without warning) has tremendous promise. However, the execution in the two books I read (this one and Vol. 13) was pedestrian. Characterization, plot, and art were all two-dimensional. (By contrast, Judge Parker has more nu ...more
J.G. Keely
A sort of reversal of the film 'Children of Men', Y the Last Man is sometimes difficult to take seriously. The storytelling itself is not bad, though it sometimes falls into the faults of Lost, with endless, predictable hardship. It is an interesting concept, and Vaughan at least connects himself tangentially to the literary tradition, but these connections are often too flimsy or too coincidental in construction.

The worst crime of all may be that one keeps feeling that Yorick is standing in as
The story started out so well: fast-paced, intriguing..I can see it's a dude comic, the main character ends up being the last man left on a planet full of allll kinds of women! No matter what kind of an ugly twat you might wanna be, some woman will want you. Yessss!
I see half-naked blonde, beachy-style woman, some ex-models running around, army women, special op women, scientist women. That's ookayyy with me. It is a dude comic, after all, no?

Then came this:
Yorick (main char): I'm not afraid of
so - while i realize that the premise of this book is supposed to be stunning in overturning the stereotypical assumption that women without men will create a feminist/lesbian utopia, a la Herland, by proposing that left to their own devices, women would act like a bunch of goomba guys, arm themselves and create civil war, strife, and general mayhem, can any of us really image a scenario in which large groups of women, left without men for extended periods of time, would NOT 1) hug a lot 2) lick ...more
Sh3lly (Not all those who wander are lost)
Maybe more like 3.5 stars, but this was pretty good. Yorick is a bit daft, but I have a feeling there's room for growth here.

It's the end of the world and somehow all the males are dead (except for Yorick and his male "assistant" shoulder monkey), and instead of a zombie apocalypse it's a bunch of raging female extremists who are the enemy. There's some political jokes aimed at everyone and a few pop culture references to appreciate.

I am definitely interested in continuing the series. I don't
As someone who's a huge fan of Brian K. Vaughn's Saga series, I expected more here. Mostly it was the total lack of charm and humor that I enjoy so much in Saga that's totally absent here, plus the plot just seemed.... I don't know how to explain it.... just off. That probably doesn't make any sense. I might read the second volume, we've got the entire series at work so hopefully the next one is better...

Scratch that, no one at work can find volume 2, the only one that's missing. So unless I ca
Ok, so overall I thought this was very intriguing, and I definitely care enough about the story to want to read the next volume. However, I did have a few weird issues with some of the content and depiction of certain characters. Also, because this came out in 2002, there are some aspects of it that I find, for lack of a better term, politically incorrect, such as using the word 'retarded' as something negative. The characters are a bit one-note so far, but it is only the first issue. From what ...more
So far so good! Volume 1 definitely piqued my interest enough to make me want to read Volume 2. And besides, the last man is HOT! What? I can't objectify the last man?

Some notes (these are mostly for me to be mindful of as I read the remaining volumes):

Yorick- Yorick's father was a Shakespeare buff and named Yorick and his sister after characters from Shakespeare's plays. The name Yorick comes from Hamlet; Yorick is the deceased court jester. He is represented in the play by a s
All the men are dead.

Yorick Brown remains after a mysterious virus eliminates every last thing with a Y chromosome. While he’s expected to do his part in figuring out why he survived, he’s mainly concerned with finding his would-be fiancé in the outback of Australia.

This would be my first experience in reading a graphic novel where the main character isn’t flying/swinging/driving around in spandex. For my first foray into the non-superhero genre, I probably couldn’t have chosen a better series.
Now that I've finished the series (well, the first 9 books -- the 10th is unavailable to me), I'll write a bit about how I feel about the series as a whole.

I really wanted to hate this series. It is incredibly sexist in so many ways, and I started taking notes on some of the more ridiculous aspects of it so I would remember by the time I got around to writing this. My husband would find random pieces of paper scattered around the house and ask me what "factories stop working, no electricity, int
Brian K. Vaughan has been getting a lot of notoriety lately for his Image publication of Saga, Volume 1. Way back in 2002 before dystopian universes became mainstream, Vaughan wrote this series under Vertigo--another fantastic publisher of mature comic content--depicting a universe where all creatures with a Y chromosome were wiped out by a plague. All but two: Yorick and his monkey pal Ampersand (&).

I found this to be very high quality. I loved Saga for many reasons... the art, the badasse
A world with no Y chromosome... more like the perfect world!... AM I RIGHT???!!? ;)

Southern Bred Southern Read
Southern Bred Southern Read
Southern Bred Southern Read
Held my attention through the entire series. Didn't start reading it until after all 10 trades were done so I had the ability to read the entire story start to finish. Vaughan surprised me with this. Ended up really liking Yorick and his dumb monkey. I put off reading this forever as something I would not have typically enjoyed and a friend with like tastes ultimately recommended it so I gave it a shot. Not disappointed. The art was decent, not great, but serviceable. I get some of the other cri ...more
All the men are gone, and there's a helper monkey!

However there is Yorick who is hilarious, i really love his humour a mix of 80s/90s references, littered with sarcasm he definitely keeps the story from getting too dark, as the women are literally losing their shit from the get go, like seriously it didn't take you lot two seconds before you decided to start a crazy ass gang and start murdering people.
Volume 1 doesn't get into the hows and whys, it's just setting up the premise of who yorick is

***Indie 500 Buddy Read with the Shallow Readers! Indie Publisher this time: Vertigo Comics***

Yorick is the last man alive on Earth. All men and male animals died simultaneously with no explanation. Women are losing their shit. There is a monkey named Ampersand who wears a diaper. These are just the beginnings of how awesome this fucking comic is.

Yorick isn't some asshole with the mentality of "I'm the last man on the planet and all vaginas should worship me" and I thank the gods for this. He's
This is the first graphic novel I've read, so far. Because after this one..I'm hooked! Yorick is a young guy, wondering where is his place on this planet. He can't find a job, he loves magic and his girlfriend, Beth. She travelled to Australia, to be all smart and to gain some experiences in anthropology, so now Yorick is all alone, feeling like a loser, because he's not doing anything remotely as important as she and the rest of his friends do. He doesn't even want to go out if his apartment an ...more
Anna  (Bananas!)
There's one scene in Y: The Last Man in particular that made the idea of losing all the men tangible for me. It's when Yorick stops at the Washington Monument (which appropriately is now a monument to all the dead men,*chuckle*) and he talks with a woman about all the male musicians that are gone.

Woman: Don't get me wrong, I don't miss anyone like I miss my pals, but it suddenly hit me today...The Rolling Stones are dead.
Yorick: In one day we lost...
W: Dylan
Y: Bowie
W: The rest of the Beatles
David "proud member of Branwen's adventuring party"
Ask a comic-book geek what the greatest graphic novel of all time was, and at least 9 out of 10 will tell you it's "Watchmen". And there's no denying Watchmen deserves the accolades it gets, as it quite effectively reinvented the graphic novel genre. However, if you asked THIS comic-book geek what the greatest graphic novel of all time was, and I would instantly tell you it's "Y The Last Man"!

The book starts out with an intriguing premise...a mysterious plague instantly kills off every man on th
In a matter of moments, a mysterious plague kills every living creature with a Y chromosome, except for one man (our hero, Yorick), and his pet monkey. What caused the plague, and what made Yorick and monkey immune? I'm hoping that Vaughn will get back to me on that before the series is over. There are no answers here, but this is just the beginning.

The entire Y series has gotten really good press and great reviews since the first issue came out years ago. I'm not sure why I never read it until
Wooooooow. This is so damn good. I cannot wait to read the second volume.
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Born in Cleveland in 1976, Brian K. Vaughan is the Eisner, Harvey, and Shuster Award-winning writer and co-creator of the critically acclaimed comics series Y: The Last Man, Runaways, and Ex Machina (picked as one of the ten best works of fiction of 2005 by Entertainment Weekly).

Recently named "Writer of the Year" by Wizard Magazine, and one of the “top ten comic writers of all time” by Comic Boo
More about Brian K. Vaughan...

Other Books in the Series

Y: The Last Man (10 books)
  • Y: The Last Man, Vol. 2: Cycles (Y: The Last Man, #2)
  • Y: The Last Man, Vol. 3: One Small Step (Y: The Last Man, #3)
  • Y: The Last Man, Vol. 4: Safeword (Y: The Last Man, #4)
  • Y: The Last Man, Vol. 5: Ring of Truth (Y: The Last Man, #5)
  • Y: The Last Man, Vol. 6: Girl on Girl (Y: The Last Man, #6)
  • Y: The Last Man, Vol. 7: Paper Dolls (Y: The Last Man, #7)
  • Y: The Last Man, Vol. 8: Kimono Dragons (Y: The Last Man, #8)
  • Y: The Last Man, Vol. 9: Motherland (Y: The Last Man, #9)
  • Y: The Last Man, Vol. 10: Whys and Wherefores (Y: The Last Man, #10)

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