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The Smile of the Lamb
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The Smile of the Lamb

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3.51 of 5 stars 3.51  ·  rating details  ·  102 ratings  ·  12 reviews
In a chorus of voices The Smile of the Lamb tells the story of Uri, an idealistic young Israeli soldier serving in an army unit in the small Palestinian village of Andal, in the occupied territories, and his relationship with Khilmi, a nearly blind old Palestinian storyteller. Gradually as the violent reality of the occupation that infects both the occupier and the occupie ...more
Paperback, 336 pages
Published August 1st 2003 by Picador (first published 1983)
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T4ncr3d1
"Noi siamo solo una lettera, solo notizie ficcate in una crepa fra cielo e terra (...)
siamo solo lettere morte e non potremo mai comprendere a fondo il dolore e la gioia che ci generiamo a vicenda."


Finalmente ripubblicato in una nuova edizione, Il sorriso dell'agnello è effettivamente il primo romanzo di David Grossman. Siamo nel lontano 1983, ma già di Grossman c'è molto, a cominciare dal primo dei quattro protagonisti, Uri, il giovane soldato idealista, che porta il nome del figlio prediletto
...more
La Stamberga dei Lettori
Finalmente ripubblicato in una nuova edizione, Il sorriso dell'agnello è effettivamente il primo romanzo di David Grossman. Siamo nel lontano 1983, ma già di Grossman c'è molto, a cominciare dal primo dei quattro protagonisti, Uri, il giovane soldato idealista, che porta il nome del figlio prediletto di Grossman e che tante pene gli farà soffrire.
Quattro dunque sono i protagonisti di questo romanzo, una scelta inusuale che difficilmente Grossman ripeterà, preferendovi il dominio di un solo e so
...more
Marja
David Grossman's "Hiuch ha-gedi" surprised me. I know I always write that a novel did not match my expectations, but all the same: I expected a boring book about the horrors of war, and instead, got a pageturner about committing injustice, and a critique of the Israeli occupation on the West Bank - written in 1982, and probably relevant for a long time still.

Since I don't feel like going into a detailed analysis of the text, I'll just list what I loved about this book:

(1) It was hard to put down
...more
La Stamberga dei Lettori
Finalmente ripubblicato in una nuova edizione, Il sorriso dell'agnello è effettivamente il primo romanzo di David Grossman. Siamo nel lontano 1983, ma già di Grossman c'è molto, a cominciare dal primo dei quattro protagonisti, Uri, il giovane soldato idealista, che porta il nome del figlio prediletto di Grossman e che tante pene gli farà soffrire.
Quattro dunque sono i protagonisti di questo romanzo, una scelta inusuale che difficilmente Grossman ripeterà, preferendovi il dominio di un solo e so
...more
Edith
I don't like this book.

At first it resembles with A.B. Yehoshua's "The Lover" (which I absolutely LOVED), in sampling different characters' perspectives and telling the story in a stream-of-consciousness style, unreliable narrators, marital breakdown by cheating but idealistic wives, and threads of psychological disturbances and emotional complexity. Albeit it sheds interesting points about modern Israeli society such as tensions between Ashkenazim and Sephardim. But this story is abstract in t
...more
Ruth
I remember being deeply moved by this book, and that I was surprised that I even liked it. I don't read much on Israel because the conflict there makes me so bloody angry. But apparently one day I was without options (hard to imagine with my shelves but maybe...). I wish I had made notes. So many books and so little time...but I may have to read this one again.
Elise
I had a big feeling of deja vu when I read this. Did I already read this book? Not a good sign that I couldn't remember.

Anyway, interesting, intriguing, tremendous writing, but filled with people overanalyzing everything. It got tiresome, to be honest.
Lboylan
I found it hard to follow, I could not always distinguish the different voices of the characters. Most of book is internal thoughts, abstractions, reflections and I found it excessively cerebral (all the characters sounded kindof the same to me).
Hermien
I enjoyed the historical background of the Israeli occupation of the West Bank, but I found it hard to follow the different characters’ internal thoughts, abstractions and reflections which were excessively cerebral.
Kate
I read this for a college course on Middle Eastern literature. This means that I was reading the book with a more analytic eye. This maybe why I never got into the book. I had trouble liking any of the characters.
Avital
I read it too long ago and loved it a lot. The story I loved most was about what goes inside the head of a runner while running.
Loen
I've liked other David Grossman better.
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From ithl.org:

Leading Israeli novelist David Grossman (b. 1954, Jerusalem) studied philosophy and drama at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and later worked as an editor and broadcaster at Israel Radio. Grossman has written seven novels, a play, a number of short stories and novellas, and a number of books for children and youth. He has also published several books of non-fiction, including int
...more
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